Featured Content

5 THINGS YOU'RE DOING WRONG WHEN CLEANING YOUR BIKE
Off-road riding means getting dirty, not just the rider but also our machines…and while we take a quick shower and we’re ready for a night out, our motorcycles don’t have it as easy! There are many different schools of thought when it comes to how to properly wash your dirty/muddy/sandy motorcycle after riding, so we took a look at some of the popular techniques and did some investigation into “what’s right and what’s wrong” when it comes to cleaning your ride. Although most of our readers are pretty sharp, most of us aren’t detailing experts so we reached out to some industry experts for their insight and advice and they are quoted here. #1: YOU’RE HARMING THE EXPENSIVE FINISHES ON YOUR BIKE Modern motocross bikes (and even older more exotic machines) can have a myriad of different types of metals and plastics that can present a problem when you want to quickly wash your bike after a day in the dirt. Materials like titanium, aluminum, magnesium, carbon fiber and hard/soft rubber may have different requirements when it comes to cleaning. We spoke first to Boris Mahlich at Motorex who stated “Certain cleaning chemicals are harsh on the finishes, glossy and matte finishes in particular and metal surfaces. Aluminum, magnesium and titanium in particular are susceptible to staining, etching and corrosion from harsh cleaning agents not suitable for such metals. Another thing to consider (is that) rubber seals which can dry and crack when continuously cleaned with harsh cleaning products or solvents.” “Solvents and cleaners that are overly acidic or alkaline (high and low pH values) are not good. Stay away from extremely alkaline cleaners and extremely acidic cleaners typically used for industrial and household applications.”  Andrew Hodges at Bel-Ray offered this insight: “Highly caustic chemicals can damage certain surfaces if left on for too long, so it is a good idea to either spot check a cleaner before applying it, or checking with the chemical’s manufacturer for their usage guidelines. Solvent based cleaners can also have a negative effect on some painted and plastic surfaces.” Brian Wilkinson of Slick Products said: “Any cleaning product that does not have a neutral or low pH of 7-8 should be used with caution. High alkaline products are very corrosive and will etch soft aluminum and will discolor those expensive anodized parts on your bike.”  In talking to these experts, it seems a safe way to go is to use cleaners that have a neutral PH not too high or low, and stay away from your rubber components where possible.   #2: YOU AREN’T USING THE RIGHT PRODUCTS ON YOUR MOTORCYCLE Walk down the automotive aisle at any big-box or automotive store and you see many offerings in the vehicle washing section. They are cheap and have great marketing…in fact I use them on my power equipment, but not on my motorcycles. What are the pros and cons of using some of these more popular mainstream “general purpose” products such as Power Purple and Simple Green? We asked our experts their honest opinions and here’s what they said.  Hodges: “General purpose cleaners usually fall into that highly caustic group I mentioned before so using them should be done with care. They are generally very good at cutting through grease and soils, but they don’t stop there. So if they are left on a surface for too long it will eventually start affecting the surface. If a part such as a plastic guard has any surface defects in the clear-coat, those highly caustic cleaners can get under the clear coat at the damaged area and spread the damage. So, they can be used, but there is more generally more risk in doing so compared to a buffered, surfactant based cleaner.” Wilkinson agreed and added: “The simple answer is that (these products) are not designed to be used on motorcycles. Industrial and household cleaners often have higher pH making them more corrosive on soft aluminum. In some cases etching and discoloring will occur in seconds while other cases corrosion tends to slowly occur after every wash.”  “In addition, do not overlook the fact that a motorcycle needs lubrication (and) using a degreaser as an overall bike wash will strip lubrication from bearings and pivots points. Unless you’re a professional mechanic who takes their bike apart every week to re-grease you should be using a product like our Off-Road Wash that removes heavy dirt and mud without stripping lubrication.” Other industry experts mentioned they were concerned with not only potential harm to the end-user of these more aggressive cleaning products, but also the effects on the environment as a whole. As with all off-road chemical products, it’s important to not only remember proper application and usage, but also think about where these products may end up, so always observe proper containment and disposal requirements.   #3: YOU AREN’T PROPERLY WASHING YOUR MACHINE Is there a right and wrong way to clean your bike? We’ve always felt as long as it looks clean at the end that what matter, right? Well, we’ve heard a lot of different advice when it comes to washing your bike.  Use pressure washer, don’t use pressure washers, stay away from all seals, never wash o-ring chain, etc.  Some of these tips seem to make sense and some may be based on old-school habits that die hard so we asked the panel their thoughts on this topic. Eddie Cole from Matrix / 1.7 Cleaning Solutions offered some tips on washing your motorcycle correctly:   “It's best to let the motorcycle cool down before washing it and lube the things right away that need to be lubed after washing. (Don’t) get water into the exhaust system and into the air filtration system, there are exhaust plugs and air filter covers on the market (that are) designed to keep water out of those areas, and use a Spray and Shine with rust preventing agent.”  Cole continued: “We think it's (also) important to dry the motorcycle properly and make sure everything is dry and in working order and we recommend cleaning the air filter right away before restarting (making sure to) remove the exhaust plug before starting the bike.  Check that that the controls, brakes and the throttle are in good smooth functioning order before starting and/or riding the bike again.” Hodges from Bel-Ray elaborated on mistakes they see riders make when cleaning their machines and this includes: “Not spot checking cleaners on aftermarket parts before coating the entire bike in cleaner. If the parts utilize a unique or uncommon surface finish, this can be problematic for cleaners that are designed for the more typical surface finishes. These parts may need some more individual attention for cleaning. Using a pressure washer to rinse the bike - the pressure washer risks pushing water and displacing lubricant or flooding into places you don’t want water.” He continued: “Thinking that a bio-based cleaner is fine to just drain into the soil or a drain. Just because it is bio-based doesn’t mean it isn’t detrimental to the environment. Water based, biodegradable cleaners are generally safe for that practice, but any solvent based cleaner (bio or not) should be disposed of properly.” Wilkinson from Slick added: “The worst mistake is a permanent one. Since being at Slick Products we have so many customers who used a product that (has) caused damage and want to know how to fix it. You can't un-corrode metal, so when you spend $8-$10K on your dirtbike don't spray a $2 cleaner on it.”   #4: YOU MAY NOT BE USING A MOTORCYCLE-SPECIFIC CLEANER Some products made “for motorcycles” can be expensive when compare to their automotive counterparts, so we’ve been somewhat reluctant to buy them as frequently and figure many of our readers feel the same. We asked the experts what makes their off-road products “motorcycle specific” so we could gain some insight into what products to buy and why. Hodges from Bel-Ray went first: “Bike Wash is a water-based, buffered, and the cleaning power is based on surfactant technology. It penetrates and lifts grease and soil from surfaces allowing for easy rinse off. A short time on the surface is all it takes for the dirt to be loosened, so by the time you spray the last area of the bike or ATV, you can begin rinsing the first area and work your way around. Unless the machine is extremely dirty, it usually requires no scrubbing or physical cleaning.” Hodges also mentioned the Bel-Ray Foam Filter Cleaner & Degreaser is designed specifically to remove dirt and the high tack filter oils common in motorcycle and ATV applications. Mahlich from Motorex explained: “Motorex products are engineered and designed by our in-house laboratory in Switzerland specifically for motorcycle applications. That means they are not industrial products that may just work on a motorcycle. The sole purpose for these products is for the care and maintenance of your motorcycle and that is what they are designed to do.” Cole from 1.7 Cleaning Solutions offered: “1.7 Cleaning Solutions were developed specifically for motorcycles,  we spent months interviewing and testing with the top mechanics in professional racing to develop a product line to meet their professionals needs and expectations.” “We needed a multi-purpose cleaning product that would attack the dirt, oil, grease grime quickly but leave a bright finish when dry. The wash needed to work and be compatible with plastic, aluminum, steel, magnesium and titanium without harming or attacking powder coated finishes, anodized finishes or chrome, (so) we developed motorcycle specific products for specific purpose that include our Formula 1 Wash Degreaser for motorcycle finishes, our Formula 2 Spray and Shine for the complete motorcycle (plastics, motor, suspension and components) that gives a factory "new look shine" and light silicone lubricant finish. Wilkinson of Slick added: “We have worked very hard to create specially formulated non-corrosive cleaning products designed for motorcycle riders, by motorcycle riders to offer a faster, safer, and easier cleaning experience. Each one of our cleaners serves a unique purpose in the cleaning process to help maintain the life, look, and value of your bike.”   #5: YOU AREN’T DETAILING YOUR MOTORCYCLE BEFORE STORAGE Many riders wash their bikes and stick them in the garage…don’t. Putting a motorcycle away for any length of time makes them susceptible to oxidation and corrosion and that’s not good. This is more of a problem for riders in colder climates with shorter riding seasons like the Northeast and there is more than one school of thought on how to put your bike away. So we asked the experts why and how to clean your motorcycle before storage. Hodges from Bel-Ray offered: “A thorough cleaning is always a good idea, but more importantly it’s what you put on rather than what you clean off when storing a bike. Cleaning the chain and applying fresh chain lube with strong anti-rust properties is the first and easiest thing to do.” “A rubber preservative for any external hoses or seals is a good idea for long term storage (and) cleaning grease and grime from electrical contacts and applying a non-conductive protectant or grease to electrical terminals is advisable. Any protective surface coatings for plastic, metal, rubber or vinyl surfaces can only help in preserving the condition of the bike.” Mahlich from Motorex added: “To keep metal finishes from oxidizing while a motorcycle is stored, cover the surfaces with a protective spray. Motorex Moto Protect is formulated to protect all painted and metal surfaces from corrosion and oxidation. Simply spray the surfaces leaving a thin protective film that will ensure your motorcycle comes out of storage looking as good as it did when it went into storage.”   In conclusion, by observing some simple protocols and using common sense when cleaning your motorcycle, you can keep that factory look and that not only makes you feel good but also preserves your hard-earned investment for future resale. Today’s motorcycles are expensive and use exotic materials that are important to the overall look and function of the machine, but there are products available that can not only clean your ride properly, but help preserve these materials so they can perform as they were originally designed. Have a though to share? Hit us up in the comments section below!
Posted by MXEditor on Mar 02, 2017

How to avoid boogered up Phillips head screws
We all have one or more Philips head screw drivers in our tool boxes. It's pretty much impossible to be a DIY'er without them. But, if you own an a vehicle that was manufactured of Asian origin, chances are, the screws on it are not "standard" Phillips head. So, if you find that your Phillips head screw drivers are ruining your fasteners, it very will might be because you're using the wrong tool for the job. Lesser known is the Japanese Industrial Standard (AKA JIS). Bottom-line, a standard Phillips driver will not go into a JIS screw all the way because the corner radius of the screw is smaller than that of a standard Phillips driver. Because of this, it leads to what is referred to as "cam-out". In fact, the standard Phillips was created to allow this, so that you know when max torque has been reached, avoiding over tightening or worse, snapping fasteners. The differences between Phillips and JIS are not easily seen, so this illustration should help. Sometimes screws will be identified as being JIS if there is a dimple or dot on its head. But, this isn't always the case. But chances are, if you're working on a Japanese machine, the Philips head screws will be JIS. JIS screw drivers are not hard to find, ranging in price from the mid to high $20.00 for the budget stuff, on up to 3x (or more) that for the good stuff. Good tools, if taken care of can last a lifetime and the right tool for the job saves time and money in the long run.
Posted by Bryan Bosch on Apr 15, 2014

The Arenacross Trials
Hello TT readers! I’ll be taking a little bit of a different approach to my entries. I’m looking to focus a little more on how my prep goes and things I learned from prep and my race, rather than on the race itself. Also, my entries may look different than they were before. Of course, if you’d like to see any more about the race itself, feel free to find me on social media! A few things I have learned recently: Keep up with the times Patience is key Don’t overjump and flat land a Supercross catapult _______________________________________________________________ Those who follow me on social media or race around the central Florida area know that I have switched from Kawasaki to Husqvarna. This decision came about after a few experiences where I felt that I was bested only by the power of the bikes I was racing against. Not that my bike wasn’t fast, but it was not a 6-hour motor like many of the pro-level bikes I line up against, and to make my bike that fast was going to cost a lot of money and lose a lot of reliability. When I had heard that Husqvarnas came stock with a substantial amount of power more accompanied with less weight, I was thoroughly shocked. After doing some research on different bike brands and the advancements in technology I felt like I had been living under a rock! Of course, once I got my FC250 I was even more blown away at the nimbleness of the bike and how well the stock suspension worked. Pay attention and keep up with the times! Before I was able to ride any Arenacross, I had less than 7 or 8 hours logged on my new bike and had been riding on stock suspension on outdoor tracks, a very different reality from what I needed to become accustomed to. I think that was good to learn the ergonomics of the bike, but also, I hadn’t ridden on stock suspension (especially on a place like Gatorback MX) in years because I have worked closely with Race Tech. Helped keep me humble and remind me how lucky I am to have some of the best suspension in the business!   Thankfully, I had the opportunity to train at the South of the Border training facility the week of the Greensboro Arenacross. When I showed up to the SOBMX Arenacross track on Monday, I really didn’t know what to expect out of myself, and I wasn’t entirely sure where to start. However, I did know that I did not have much time before the weekend and I needed to get myself situated and get down to business if I had any hopes of gaining my Road to SX points. While it took me a couple of laps, I quickly tapped into the skills I had gained from 2 years ago racing AX. I was quickly reminded, however, that in that type of tight riding and especially in the whoops needed to be taken with a bit of patience. It only took one “holy crap I’m about to eat dirt” moment on the AX track. In motocross, the motos may be longer and the tracks are bigger, but you have moments for rest and can usually keep it very smooth and not expend a ton of energy. In AX, this is not the case. It is constant setting up and adjusting and analyzation and awareness which can be both mentally and physically exhausting if you don’t learn how to make your moves less dramatic and set up correctly to fight the bike less. Patience is key, don’t rush it! 2018 Greensboro Arenacross, photo by MEPMX Now, onto the fails! After gaining some useful time on the AX track and relearning how to approach the obstacles and rework my thoughts, I decided to take a swing at the SX track for fun! Rhythm sections, no issue. Whoops, well I decided to avoid those on my first day (SX whoops are VERY different from AX whoops). Long story short, I WAY over estimated the catapult and ended up overshooting and flat landed… my wrists still feel it a week and a half later. Another awesome fail came when I was working on rhythms through the whoop section on the AX track because they had gotten too beat to consistently blitz every time. Like a typical guy I was getting it down pat, using a mixture of jumping and wheel tapping to make my way through with ease and a lot less energy. Then, I started coming into my first wheel tap with a bit more gusto because I was nailing the corner before. All went well until I started rushing the rhythm… and it was then that I had missed the second wheel tap because of a lapse of judgement and accidentally decided to try and ride a nose wheelie through the rest of the whoop section, which ended in me crashing. Had to walk if off, of course. That helped me learn that when I let “it” come naturally and didn’t rush the track, it allows me to think each step out and adjust in those fraction-of-a-second moments. This also helped me maintain focus and hammer out smooth, consistent laps. Patience is key! Ended up coming away from Greensboro Pro Arenacross with 13th in the AX class, and 15th in the AX Lites. Straight to the AX main event from the heat race, and through some rather determined racing in the AX Lites Last Chance Qualifier I worked my from 5th to 2nd for the last spot for the main. All while keeping these small lessons (along with others) in mind in the process. Not too bad for my first Pro Arenacross race in 2 years with a week of prep! Be sure to keep your eyes for the next entry where I will talk a little more about the mental game in prep and during race day. Click the follow button to get updated when I post new entries! I’ll see you at the races. 2018 Greensboro Arenacross, Lites LCQ, Photo by Mike Vizer Big thanks to Mike Burkeen and Taylor Futrell at SOBMX for having me at the facility and for the words of wisdom that were massively helpful in my prep. Looking forward to going back for the week of the Florence Arenacross and progressing even more and getting better and better! Also, big thanks to Hans and the crew at Xtreme Powersports for getting me in touch with the right people to make the Husqvarna deal happen! Lastly, big thanks to Jeff and his crew at MPR Suspension for getting my suspension set up and returned to me in a bit of a pinch. Thanks to Husqvarna, Xtreme Powersports, TMI Calibration, Race Tech, MPR Suspension, Boyesen, Twisted Development, Fly Racing, EKS Brand, Wiseco, EVS, RoostMX graphics, Acerbis, Dunlop, Bulletproof Threads, Mika Metals, DT1 Filters, MotoSeat, Tamer Billet MX, Evergood Co, and SOBMX. 2018 Greensboro Arenacross, Photo by MEPMX
Posted by Scott Meshey 141 on Feb 04, 2018

Is Your Handlebar Position Working Against You?
At Ride Engineering, we pay close attention to handlebar position and bar mount height. You’d be surprised just how much a few millimeters from stock can make to improve your body position and overall control. Keeping the bars neutral is another important aspect. By this we mean keeping the bars parallel to the forks within a few degrees. Drastically changing them by raising the bars 25mm+ or moving them forward that much can have a totally adverse effect. This article’s main focus is to explain where the “sweet spot” is for maximum control reinforcing the proper riding position on track or trail.  Handlebars that are rotated too far out of parallel alignment with the forks can create adverse handling issues The first thing that you want to do is pick a handlebar bend that you are comfortable with. Typically, a lower bar will allow you to “muscle” the bike more, but it should still be relative to your height. For example, at my 5’6” stature I like the lowest bends. Currently, my favorite handlebar is the Husqvarna bend Pro Taper Evo. It's 80mm in height at the ends and a little less sweep that my old favorite, the Pro Taper Carmichael. If you’re a bit taller, you may like the SX Race bend with a height of 87mm. Those over 6’, may like the stock Honda bars at 97mm tall (Renthal 971). Since each bike is different, your favorite bar may still need further adjustment. For example, I love the Husky bar on a Husky or KTM with the stock bar height, but on the 2017 CRF450R, I preferred it 5mm lower. On my current 2018 RM-Z450, I prefer them 5mm higher. I tried the SX Race bend with the stock bar mount height, but they felt too tall for me, even though the net difference was only 2mm more. Also, due to my short arms, in every case I run the bar mounts in the back position. This gives me a good head over the bars posture and maximum control of the bike. Incidentally, the forward holes that come on a stock KX-F and YZ-F triple clamps are too far forward for most riders. Before you start shaking your head and tell me that the OEMs wouldn’t design it that way if that were true, let me explain further. Because they use a rubber mounting design, which I agree is way better than the old metal on metal system, they have no choice but to put the forward holes 25-30mm out. The rubber cones are over an inch in diameter, so it’s not physically possible to provide a second mounting position any closer than that. Remember, KTM used to have two positions. But back then it was only a 10mm bolt hole, so it was possible to add a second hole 15mm away. Then by using an offset bar mount you could make changes in 5mm increments. Now that they also offer a rubber cone system, they have eliminated the forward position all together. Ride Engineering bar mounts are typically made the same height as stock (except YZ bar mounts which are the same as the 2017 & older stock mounts and 5mm lower than the 2018) with plus or minus 3mm of adjustability forward or back. We also offer 5mm and 10mm spacer kits to raise our mounts (Ride bar mounts come with posts that unscrew to allow for a height adjustment or to replace in the event they are bent in a crash). Aftermarket bar mounts that are 20 or more millimeters higher that stock are going to put the rider in a less than ideal riding position. Neutrally mounted handlebars Many steering dampers also have this adverse effect. They mount over the stem nut and under the handlebar, so often raising the bar is the only way to make clearance (Ride Eng. offers a damper kit that mounts behind the front number plate, allowing one to keep the bar height standard). Some riders like to go on mellow trail rides for a couple of hours and have found really tall handlebars add comfort. The problem lies when you come across a rider heading in your direction or an unforeseen obstacle that needs an instantaneous reaction. A poor riding posture can contribute to a crash and getting injured. If that happens, any added comfort will be the last thing on your mind. Handlebar mounts w/ spacers Here’s how a few fast guys with a lot of riding experience set up their riding position: Sean Lipanovich Pro 5’5” - 150lb - 27 yrs old  Years riding from 12 yrs old to present  Slmxschool.com Current ride: 2017 KTM450sxf Sean has raced professional supercross and motorcross, finished in the top 25 at the 2016 USGP, won the 25+ class at the 2017 Vet World championships and now trains young riders for SL MX School. He’s always couching riders to “put your head over the bars, squeeze the bike with your knees and be on the balls of your feet.” “I run the stock KTM handlebars (78mm tall) in the back position (bar mounts rotated back) with the Ride Eng. bar mount that is the same height as stock with the bars neutral (not rotated forward or back) to the forks. I feel this gives me the most control of the bike to get on the gas harder.”   Kris Keefer Pro 6’ – 170lbs – 40 yrs old Years riding from 9 yrs old to present Keeferinctesting.com Favorite bike: 2018 YZ450F At 24 years old, Kris started his testing career with Yamaha Motor Corporation which led him to a position at Dirt Rider magazine as associate editor, then eventually to Senior Test editor. Today he’s doing his own testing and pod casts as a new business owner for keeferinctesting.com. Throughout his career he’s raced professional motocross and supercross, the Canadian nationals, Vet World and Loretta Lynn’s.  “I use the SX Race bend on my YZ450F with last year’s bar mounts (5mm lower) in the back hole with the mounts rotated forward. I like to keep the bars fairly neutral and coach others to do the same. If you have your bars rotated too far back, it’s harder to get your weight forward on the bike when entering corners. If you have them rotated too far forward where the ends are pointing up, you don’t have the right leverage to initiate the turn.”   Ted Campbell Pro 6’ – 210lbs – 42 yrs old Years riding from 12yrs old to present Current bike: 2017 CRF450R Ted has traveled the world racing professional supercross and motorcross and has made many lifelong friends because of dirt bikes. He obtained his first pro national number in 1999 and kept a top 100 number for 6-7 years of his professional racing career.  “I use the Mika Metal’s RC bend (this is a tall bar at 105mm), and like to set up my bike with my bars just behind the forks (bar mounts rotated back) in the neutral position so I can get over the front of the bike. I feel I have more control turning and it puts me more in the attack position. I run my bars back further than most being 6’ tall but it gives me the ability to really feel comfortable turning and leaning the bike over as I’m on top of the bars more.” Ted added a set of Ride Eng. CRf triple clamps which did lower the bar position 5mm and moved it 3mm forward from stock.                                                                    Cody Webb Pro 6’ 3” – 185lbs – 29 yrs old Years riding from 3yrs old to present https://www.facebook.com/codywebb247/ Current bike: 2017 350EXC Cody is the 2010 AMA National Trials champion,  2014 and 2017 AMA Endurocross champion and has finished on the podium or won numerous other off-road races like the 2017 Erzberg Rodeo where he finished in 3rd place.  “I run the PHDS bar mount system (these have +/- 5mm of adjustability) with the Renthal 996 handlebars (93mm tall) on Neken triple clamps with no added bar risers although sometimes I hit my knees on the bars. We place the bar mount in the forward hole (these have two 10mm holes for adjustment) with the bar mounts rotated back. If I have the stock clamps on my practice bike, I run the mounts in the forward position. I also like the bars just a hair rolled back from the neutral position.” Cody’s race results speak for themselves and his “average Joe” set up works great even for a guy 6’3” tall (he only raised his bars 15mm from the stock height).   I hope this helps everyone understand regardless of your stature, you shouldn’t increase your bar height or move the bars forward too drastically. Small increments of 5mm is ideal. In many cases such as mine lowering the bars will be far more beneficial in reinforcing proper riding posture, getting your head over the bars and maintaining optimal control of your dirt bike. Happy riding. Adrian Ciomo President Ride-engineering.com Vet Int. 5’6” - 150lb - 53 yrs old Years riding from 14 yrs old to present Current ride: 2018 RMZ450   About Ride Engineering Ride Engineering Inc designs and manufactures the highest quality billet aluminum accessories to improve the performance of motocross and off-road motorcycles specializing in handling and braking components. The company combines hands on testing with feedback from past and present professional race teams to bring products to the average customer that are typically not available for sale. Located in Southern California, all Ride Engineering products are made in the USA. For more information on the company visit: http://www.ride-engineering.com/about.php  
Posted by Ride Engineering on Feb 02, 2018

The Health & Performance Dangers of Becoming Hungry
Most nutritional and hydration errors occur because the food and water is not readily available. If you are hungry and you don’t have healthy snacks and meals to consume, you will inevitably end up going through a drive through to satisfy your hunger – this is completely different than eating fast food because you don’t care about your health. Speaking of being hungry, this is a sensation that you should NOT be experiencing on a daily basis. When it comes to nutrition for both your health and performance, there are two simple questions that you have to ask yourself: 1. Am I eating fresh fruit, vegetables and high quality fat every two (2) hours? 2. Am I getting hungry before the two (2) hour window of time has transpired? Think about this for a minute, if you are eating nutrient dense fruits, vegetables and protein every two hours (this stabilizes your blood sugar levels along with satisfies your appetite) and you are still getting hungry – YOU NEED TO EAT MORE FOOD! This sounds completely contrary to the mainstream mindset; however, being hungry will undermine your efforts at each workout. Think about your car, if you have a half a tank of gas and you want to drive 1000 miles, you can’t without filling up your gas tank. Your body is the same one but with one extra catch. To improve your workout quality, your brain and muscles need adequate sugar to complete the workout and raise its fitness to the next level. Without the new threshold of workload, the muscles will not be stimulated enough to create an adaptation – the result is a performance plateau. When it comes to determining how much protein, carbohydrates and fats you have to consume refrain from pulling out a scale and reading labels extensively. Instead, focus on your hunger levels (there shouldn’t be any), evaluate your performance results (consistency and improvement) and your biofeedback (quality of sleep, resting heart rate, personality characteristics). If these evaluation elements are not consistently positive, you need to eat more food. If you begin to eat too much (this rarely happens), you will get a clear notice: your clothes will begin to wear tight. Remember, stress comes in many forms: relationship, work, financial, workouts, hydration, hunger, etc. The value of your health and wellnexs is finding the correct balance of volume & intensity of training to maximize your training efforts and achieve your personal goals. Ironically, it all starts with consuming adequate amounts of high quality food, remember it is all about Working Smart, Not Hard! Yours in health and sport, -Coach Robb 
Posted by Coach Robb on Dec 12, 2017

General

Smallest enclosed trailer
I'm looking for a small, tiny enclosed trailer. Thinking 4x6. I should be able to fit either a quad, or a single bike shouldn't I?
Cargo trailer roof flat vs rounded? Roof vents? General experiences and opinions.
Thinking bout buying a 7x14 cargo trailer to use as a toy hauler/camper and can’t decide on what kind of roof to get? So the obvious is the rounded roof will be less likely to leak but I like the extra storage of the v-nose and they only come in the flat roofs. Flat tops also seem to be a lot more common also. Has anybody had any real problems with the flat roofs leaking? Also,are roof vents prone to leaking? I have noticed that most have very thin metal roofs with 24” O.C. crossmembers,how in the heck do you work on/instal a roof vent when the roof is to weak to even lay on?Looking for general tips and opinions on cargo trailers. Thx
Heart rate monitor for moto and hare scrambles
I know this has been talked about before but I couldn’t find anything that asked the exact question I’m looking for.   I’ve realized that it would be a help for me to get a heart rate monitor and start gathering more info about what I’m doing while racing. Preferably I’m looking for a chest mounted monitor just because I’ve never been a watch guy or anything like that.   I really want to get a heart rate monitor that I can ride moto and hare scrambles so that I can take that info and exercise to that goal. That being said I’m not really needing anything with tracking, but I would need it to be able to record for up to an hour without needing to be near my phone or a smart watch.   Any help would be appreciated and I am planning to stay under $100 ideally but am open to other options.

Dirt Bike

Stonyford...
Rode Stony today and had a blast but the number of quads and side by sides is growing by leaps and bounds.  It’s out of control in my opinion.  Those folks have every right to be out there but those vehicles are largely operated by folks who don’t know where they are going or what the hell they are doing.  Many are first timers to these vehicles and the woods.  On more than one occasion, while stopped for a quick break, we’ve seen Bo and Luke Duke drift a SXS at super high speeds around fairly blind corners.  Even saw a group trying to get four-4 seaters up trail 27/28.  Have you seen the flat land around Davis Flat??? Crazy!   Im hoping there is an amicable solution, something clearly needs to be done.   I may sound a little too “glass half empty” on this but I fear the good ‘ol days at Stony are numbered. Bummed.
crf150r 2014 clicking Sound
hi guys, so im writing this cause i notice that my crf150r 2014 model has this clicking sound everytime i try to stear my bars? does anyone know what the problem is and how to fix it    cheers and thanks for your response 
Boston area
I could get an opportunity to move there i.e I'm not yet in Boston area but just want to know I'm an old euro enduro rider (since '76) and would like to know if there are some places to ride ? How far from Boston suburb and information are welcome... Are people use trailers, is it safe ?  or van is mandatory ? Are enduro bikes plated ? My current one in Europe is a 450 RMX See my posts on suzuki rmx 450 on this website. Thanks in advance guys Cheers Jean-Patrick      

ATV/UTV

Should I buy this Banshee?
Alright so I’ve been wanting a banshee for a while now. Supposedly the bike is complete and comes with an extra set of tires. It’s a 98 and needs a complete bottom end;clutch, cases, crank, etc. Has new pistons in the box. This is all for $500. What do you guys think?? I also have two other people saying they will sell me there banshees that only need a top end done. 
Which Honda has the sport clutch?
Help me out here. Looking to get my 11 year old a 250 sport clutch atv. I thought 2006 and later all had the sport clutch, but I looked at a 2007 today and it didn’t have it.   Does anyone have info on what year the sport clutch started? Are there 2 models after 2006? One with and one without the sport clutch?   I may just pick up an LTZ250 and put out the $300 for he Magura mod, but I kind of like the Honda better.  
Mule610
Just put a new carburetor on a 610 mule and it’s pouring fuel out of the vent tube on the carburetor and acts like it has a rough idle act likes it’s flooding

Street

Bandit 1200s run issues??
98 model, basically stock other than a Dekelvic can. Never had an issue until recently. Seems to be coil/plug wires or carb? This thing will start and run but on only 2, maybe 3 cylinders. I've tested the coils and found no issues with either of them. Plug wires/caps are original. Removed the carbs for inspection. They were beautiful internally. I'm kinda getting frustrated with this as it was such a sudden change, apparently for no reason at all🤔. I did a coil conversion (Dodge Neon type) on an 83 1100 Goldwing a couple years ago and it was a complete success . This included the coil, wires, caps and plugs. I'm thinking of going this route again in lew of the standard Suzuki items. As always, I would like to go the least expensive(cheap)route first.   Shoot me your thoughts and suggestions please. Thanks for your help. PaydayGabe in Vegas, .    
LETS see YOUR street BIKES! i see all these other threads...
i see all these other threads for cars and trucks... lets see some street bikes.. what do you do with them? anyone street race? drag race? :banana: here is my 2008 ZX14..... the first day i got it.. started a few mods and how she sits NOW!!!!
Looking for riders in north carolina
Anyone from north carolina and ride? me and my buddy just got drz400's are looking for other riders to meetup with in the state. we are local to charlotte but ride all over. let me know if your from around here and want to ride! 

Snow

Buying sleds
So I️m looking at buying two sleds in a combo deal, one is a 2001 ski doo summit 800 with 2100 miles, other is a 2003 Polaris super sport 550 with 1600 miles, are these reliable sleds? I️ heard the Polaris had cooling issues or something but not sure if I️t was in those years or not, anything helps, thanks
Polaris OEM parts
Any recommendations for OEM Polaris (others too) sled parts? I don't have a good option locally.    

PWC

Stuck wrist pin
I’m doing (well trying to) a top end on my kx250f and I have everything apart except I can’t get the wrist pin out. It slides back and forth in the piston but won’t come all the way out. Yes I know there’s a special tool but I don’t have it and don’t wanna spend money for it. How can I remove it with out special tools? Also there seems to be some coolant in the oil of the crank case and I’m not really sure how to replace it. Thanks for any info in advance!
2002 wr426f vs 2005 wr450f
Okay so I have a 2002 wr426f and want to put a snowbike kit on it but all the fit kits for em are for 2005 wr450f’s and newer. I’m wondering how different could the bikes be and would the fit kit for a newer bike fit my 426. Thanks for any info in advance.
1996 xr600r
I have a 1996 xr600r I need some help with long story short I was riding it we road all day bike ran superb got back home and back would not start no matter what I tried everything... I'm puzzled it has good spark and I just recently rebuilt carb... any help is greatly appreciated thanks....   Sent from my SM-G950U using ThumperTalk mobile app    

Meet the Experts