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5 minute silencer repack.


jimbob69

If your one of those people who like to keep up on there silencer repacking, to keep that crisp response and that throaty tone, this is for you.

1)Take silencer off of bike.

2)Drill all rivets out, endcap rivets and all, fully dissasemble the silencer.

3)Measure (on the endcap end) of your silencer body, just past the rivet holes and make an even cutting mark all the way around, a scribe or marker will do. (make note of the amount cut off, measure it and write it down)

4) Cut the silencer body along the line you made in step 3, With a die grinder and disk, dremel, or even a hacksaw, so you have an end on your silencer body with no holes.

5)Now, Use the measurement from how much you cut off your silencer body (the one that you wrote down in step 3) And cut that much off the core of your silencer.

6)Now take your endcap, and on the surface that touches the inside of the silencer body, measure from the outside edge to the center of a rivet hole, then take that measurement, and transfer it to the silencer body and make an even scribe all the way around the endcap end.

7)Now slide the endcap in backwards, and mark out on the silencer body where the holes are that you want to use, ( I used three, one on top and 2 on the sides towards the bottom).

8) Now on the intersections of the marks you made in step 6 and 7 drill 1/4" holes in the silencer body, so they will match up with the holes in the endcap.

9) Slide the endcap in the silencer body again, now putting the bolts you are going to use through the holes you just drilled, and putting the nuts on the backside. Snug all the nuts down.

10) Weld the nuts to the inside of the endcap, then remove the bolts and the endcap.

11)Rivet the silencer body back onto the midpipe and core section, use high temp silicone for a good seal and no vibration.

12) reinstall silencer, pack it full of your favorite packing, put some silicone on the endcap and slide it in, put your bolts in, tighten it all down, wipe off the excess silicone. And your done!

The benefit of this is that now all you have to do to repack your silencer is take out your 3 or so bolts, that you welded nuts on the inside of the endcap for, out, pull your endcap off, pull out your old packing, put new stuff in, reinstall your endcap with the bolts.

No more drilling rivets and stuff.

I did this to my 400 and it definitely cuts down on maintenance time, since i repack about 3 times per season.

Im sorry if my instructions are hard to follow, especially without pics, hopefully you got the idea. :excuseme:

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