Jump to content

7 Engine Heat Fighting Products You Need To Understand


MXEditor

As summer rolls in and the temps roll up, we off-road riders seek relief from the oppressive heat while trying to stay cool. For us the task at hand may be solved with choosing from the incredible variety of vented riding gear, hydration systems, and cooling vests…but for your motorcycle it may not be as easy to pick a solution that works as well.

 

Modern off-road motorcycles use water-cooled systems to manage engine heat. Before water cooling, controlling engine heat was much more difficult because of the overall design of the engines and the way “hot spots” are produced, especially in the cylinder walls. Water cooling allowed engine designers to effectively manage these hot spots and dissipate heat from these areas, allowing higher compression ratios and overall power to weight gains.

 

But managing heat is still a huge problem…heat is your enemy and can rob valuable horsepower on any off-road machine…many off-road bikes are now coming with EFI systems and their ECU (on-board computer) reacts to excessive heat by retarding the spark advance curve (and even shutting down the engine), thereby removing the chance to achieve maximum engine output.

 

To read a good reference article about how modern EFI systems are affected by engine heat, check out this cool Boyesen Engineering Tech Tip article.

 

ccs-3-0-02264300-1468244847.png

 

Before beginning the article we studied boring stuff like “surfactants” and learned that these surfactant things that keep getting mentioned are substances that lower the surface tension of a liquids like water or the tension between certain liquids or between a liquid and a solid, kind of like a lubricant…and that makes sense because surfactants may act as detergents, wetting agents, emulsifiers, foaming agents, and dispersants.

 

Whew that was mouthful…but when we talk about these “surfactants” we’re talking about a quality that the cooling substance contains to aid in the disbursement of cooling area within the contained cooling system.

 

We also talked to the experts about what happens when you use the newer “No-Boil” cooling formulas such as Evans Waterless or Two2Cool’s PRO-G formula and we found the feedback suprising – read on to see what some of them said…

 

It also helps to understand where hot spots come from and understand the phenomenon known as “cavitation”…And why is it bad for cooling systems? We asked the experts at Boyesen Engineering and this is what they said:

 

Fluid air cavitation within a closed loop engine cooling system is an often overlooked problem area that contributes to an engine’s overall inability to maintain operating temperatures. Cooling fluid cavitation is the formation of small air cavities in the coolant – i.e. small fluid-free zones (“air bubbles" or "voids”). These air bubbles are the consequence of friction based impeller forces acting upon the cooling fluid.

 

From a physics point of view, whenever a fluid is “cut", in this instance by a water pump impeller, tiny air bubbles are introduced into the fluid resulting from the fast change in pressure. Air does not have the same ability to express heat out of the internal surfaces of your machine’s engine when compared to cooling fluid and this contributes to “hot spots” and overheating.

 

We’ve taken some time to look at some of the solutions offered in this arena in order to give all of us a better understanding of how these products work and why they may be good (or not so good) for our overheated iron steeds.

 

As most off-road bikes are water cooled in one way or another, we’ll look at products that may improve that system in some way, whether it be by hardware (radiator caps and improved pumps/impellers) as well as products that can be added to improve the cooling efficiency and heat dissipation of aforementioned systems (coolants and additives).

 

Now that I've laid the foundation and you've read this far, click to the next page for product 1 of the 7 engine heat fighting products you need to know about.

 


 

#1: TWO2COOL COOLANTS

 

How does it work?

 

Two2Cool has a coolant line consisting of three different coolants/antifreeze formulas, or as an additive and they can be used in automotive or motorcycle applications diesel or gas.

 

All share a proprietary "Heat Transfer Fluid" that removing the heat from the engine and moving to where it can be released into the air that passes over the radiator(s) using the "Total Contact" technology that reduces aeration, air pockets and surface tension.

 

PRO-G is the newest product and it is a “no-boil” formula. We’ve heard different and varied opinions this technology and how it works and the jury still seems to be out but Two2Cool is hanging their reputation on it, and the owner Bill Swisher has been around the block more than once and is a very smart cat.

 

How do you use it?

 

Most products are ready to use straight out of the bottle and into your cooling system. (ThumperTalk Staff recommends flushing your cooling system any time you change from one type to another to avoid cross-contamination) and the coolant additives are mixed at 8oz. per gallon.

 

More specific instructions on proper use should be noted on the bottle or the Two2Cool website.

 

How do you dispose of it?

 

All the Two2Cool coolant products are biodegradable as they use Propylene Glycol (PG) as needed which makes it legal in virtually all race sanctioning and safe on the trails.

ccs-376432-0-15349100-1468172741.jpg


Photo: Two2Cool's Pro-G No Boil Racing Coolant

 


 

#2: ENGINE ICE COOLANT

 


How does it work?

 

Engine Ice Hi-Performance Coolant is a product that uses a very high grade of PG (Propylene Glycol), pure water and a protective iingredient in a proprietary blending process. These ingredients and the processes create more consistent, if not lower, operating temperatures in your engine through "surfaction" (remember this?) surfaction is a reduction of surface tension of the liquid coolant within the system. Engine ice is run by Dave Kimmey, another long-time veteran of the motorcycle industry and a wealth of knowledge as well.

 

How do you use it?

 

Mix nothing with it, it is pre-diluted and ready to use. You drain the cooling system and put in the Engine Ice, or rinse the system with bottled water first (never put tap water in an engine) but the best way according to Engine Ice is to the flush the system with 50/50 white vinegar and bottled water before filling with the product.

 

So, you fill the cooling system, run engine until warm, let cool, drain, fill with bottled water, run engine, let cool, drain and fill with the product…same as cleaning a coffee maker.

 

How do you dispose of it?

 

Engine Ice is biodegradable as defined by OSHA and the FDA, but once run through an engine, it's not quite as "nice" as it originally was, so it is recommend you dispose of all fluids properly like any glycol based product.

 

Fact: Some motorcycle shops and auto shops will take used fluids as it is sold and recycled.

 


ccs-376432-0-54883400-1468174087.png


Photo: Engine Ice Hi-Performance Coolant



 

#3: THE BOYESEN SUPERCOOLER

 

Boyesen Engineering has developed a water pump system called the Supercooler which can increase the performance of your cooling system by flowing more coolant and eliminating cavitation (remember this?) where possible.

 

What is cavitation and why is it bad for cooling systems?

 

Fluid air cavitation within a closed loop engine cooling system is an often overlooked problem area that contributes to an engine’s overall inability to maintain operating temperatures. Cooling Fluid Cavitation is the formation of small air cavities in the coolant – i.e. small fluid-free zones (“air bubbles" or "voids”). These air bubbles are the consequence of friction based impeller forces acting upon the cooling fluid.

 

From a Physics point of view, whenever a fluid is “cut", in this instance by an impeller, tiny air bubbles are introduced into the fluid resulting from the fast change in pressure. Air does not have the same ability to express heat out of the internal surfaces of your machine’s engine when compared to cooling fluid. With this in mind the absolute design criteria for any water pump system’s impeller is to re-introduce coolant back into the engine with as little air cavitation as possible.

 

How does it work?

 

Boyesen addresses these issues by engineering a better design that cuts down on cavitation and improves flow rates by improved impeller and pump cover design. The Boyesen hydrodynamic water pump kits have been tested and designed to flow more coolant and eliminate cavitation within the coolant, and a result, deliver a much more efficient “coolant charge” to the engine. By increasing the flow, the engine will run cooler at a more constant temperature.

 

The Supercooler's design is based on the process of correcting the inefficiencies and production-based limitations found in the design of stock water pump systems. This would include re-engineering the inlet diameter capacity and hydrodynamic efficiency of the impeller. Boyesen claims the Supercooler can reduce engine temperatures by as much as ten degrees, as confirmed by tests at Team Kawasaki.

 

So how does the Supercooler achieve this?

 

Hydrodynamics.

 

Boyesen's investment-cast aluminum water pump cover has bigger water inlets, a sculpted design, no casting seams, less restrictive corners, a more efficient impeller and less cavitation than other units available.

 

The Supercooler's optimally formed interior surfacing process eliminates all coolant flow "pinch-points" resulting in a hydrodynamically efficient interior that dramatically increases coolant flow efficiency and ultimately leads to increased fluid flow re-entry rates into your bike's engine. It also features a large inlet opening. This is superior to stock inlets, which are small and often have 90-degree bends. The patented impeller is 25 percent more efficient at moving water than stock systems. The design reduces fluid cavitation, which increases cooling capacity.

 

More info on the SuperCooler can be found at Boyesen.com

 

ccs-376432-0-13950300-1468181121.jpg


Photo: Boyesen Supercooler as installed in

ThumperTalk Review by TT Reviewer Monk



 

#4: EVANS WATERLESS POWERSPORT COOLANT

 

How does it work?

 

Evans Powersports Coolant is a waterless engine coolant, consisting of a blend of glycols, the same basic chemicals found in antifreeze, but without the water so it essentially does not boil in the radiator like regular water based coolants. Coolant formulas with 10% or more water content create vapor pressure and have a boiling point too close to the coolant’s operating temperature. Steam takes up 1,244 times more space than liquid water; that’s enough expansion power to run a freight train…

 

Inside your engine, that vapor expansion pushes liquid coolant out of the cooling passages. The naked metal temperature at those locations can then spike by hundreds of degrees, which is the source of hot spot detonation. When things really get cooking, the head can warp causing head gasket failure.

 

Because Evans is waterless and has a very high boiling point, it does not suffer from this steam expansion or the associated problems of boiling coolant with its air bubbles and resulting hotspots.

 

How do you use it?

 

When converting to Evans, as we've mentioned earlier, you must get the water out of the system and Evans makes a product for this called Prep Fluid; instructions are on the bottle. In an emergency, water or antifreeze can be added to Evans, although that will reduce its performance down to that of antifreeze. It is non-corrosive, doesn’t go bad, and has a freeze point of -40C/F. It shrinks as it cools so there is no freeze-burst danger.

 

How do you dispose of it?

 

The formulas do contain ethylene glycol (except the CCS, ASRA, and AMA Pro Flat Track legal “NPG Coolant”), so they should be handled and recycled in the same manner as antifreeze.

 

ccs-376432-0-39334600-1468203992.jpg


Photo: Evans Waterless Powersports Coolant



 

#5: MISHIMOTO OVERSIZED RADIATORS

 

How does it work?

 

A high-quality radiator in good working order is one of the most important components when addressing your cooling issues. These radiators feature a 100% brazed aluminum core and each radiator is designed for a clean OEM fit and have been assembled with precision TIG welding for durability.

 

Mishimoto oversized radiators are designed to optimize coolant capacity as well as cooling fin density and pitch, as well as strength and durability, to meet the unique demands motocross racing and off-road riding..

 

These radiators are made with two or three rows of high-quality aluminum, which allows all parts of the radiator, including the tanks, to dissipate heat faster than a stock unit. Also, the cooling fins are designed for maximum heat dissipation. The coolant tubes on Mishimoto radiators have greater surface areas for improved cooling over stock OEM radiators and they feature more coolant capacity than OEM applications.

 

How do we correctly determine if we need an oversized radiator?

 

Any time a motorcycle sees heavy usage, it can benefit from increased cooling capacity afforded by a performance radiator. Even in an otherwise stock, mildly ridden or driven application, the performance product provides that extra margin of safety on a hot, humid day.

 

How do we install the product - are there any special considerations?

 

The Mishimoto products are designed with ease of installation in mind, so it should be a simple bolt-in affair and they also have Customer Service line that can walk you through the installation should you have questions.

ccs-376432-0-37699300-1468203994.jpg


Photo: Mishimoto oversized radiator test results on 2009 RM-Z250



 

#6: RED LINE SUPERCOOL COOLANT AND WATER WETTER COOLANT ADDITIVE

 

How does it work?

 

Red Line’s WaterWetter acts as a surfactant, a wetting agent that pushing bubbles away from metal to add cooling efficiency when an engine gets hot. It is AMA-legal, as it does not add slipperiness or change water’s coefficient of friction. WaterWetter is completely compatible with glycol antifreeze, but WaterWetter alone has no freezing protection properties.

 

WaterWetter is also available for motorcycles as “SuperCool with WaterWetter”, a premixed coolant with the right amount of WaterWetter and filtered, deionized water.

 

How you use it?

 

SuperCool with WaterWetter is simple to use, just flush your radiator, fill it and you’re done. This can be convenient, as most riders don’t know their bike’s coolant system capacity offhand. When using just WaterWetter, you can use a 12oz bottle to treat up to 3.5 gallons.

 

How do you dispose of the product? Is it biodegradable?

 

WaterWetter and SuperCool are both completely biodegradable.

ccs-376432-0-40262800-1468205403.jpg


Photo: Red Line Supercool with WaterWetter

 



#7 CYCRA/CV4 HIGH PRESSURE RADIATOR CAPS

 

How does it work?

 

CYCRA/CV4 offers a radiator cap can increase the boiling point of your coolant. How does it do this?

 

By increasing the pressure required before it opens to release (and lose) your valuable coolant. Straight water will boil around 212 degrees, but under pressure your cooling system will prevent the coolant from boiling at that temperature. Many coolant mixtures will not boil until almost 300 degrees – so when the pressure is higher, the temp to boil is higher as well.

 

Stock radiator caps are rated at around 15PSI and the CV4 cap is rated at a bit over 25PSI and as the CV cap is designed to open at a higher pressure (and temperature) it keeps the cooling system from overflowing until the bike reaches a higher temperature. Keep in mind that radiator caps are also rated in atmospheric pressures (BAR) - 1.1 bar is roughly 15psi, and 1.3 bar is around 18psi.

 

How you use it?

 

Installation is simple and simply requires that you replace the stock radiator cap. If you’d like to read more about the real-world usage of these types of radiator caps, you’ll want to check out this thread in the ThumperTalk Forum.

ccs-376432-0-24695900-1468241543.jpg


Photo: CYCRA/CV4 High Pressure Radiator Cap

 

We're sure that there are more viable powersports cooling products out there, we just didn't have the time to cover them all in one article. But, we'd love to hear from you either about what we wrote or about products and/or techniques that you're using with success that we didn't cover. Thanks in advance for your comments (see below)!

 

Sean Goulart, Contributing Editor



User Feedback

Recommended Comments

I'm interested to hear some thoughts on the tradeoffs with using higher-pressure radiator caps that raise the boiling temp.

 

I use a 1.6 cap with Maxima Cool-Aide coolant and it has eliminated my overheating issues, although I have to admit shortly after I started using it I had to replace the water pump seals on my 07 KTM 450EXC. 

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is a good article, but using terms like "better" or "more" don't mean much.  Where is the specific data?  Is it 1% "better" or "more" or is it 50% "better" or "more."  Current prices would also be helpful so we can calculate bang for our bucks and determine if its worth the upgrade.

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting article.  I agree with JW Smith that mere words claiming improvements without comparative data to back them up are meaningless.  Likewise, the Mishimoto radiator graphic shows the difference in water temperature between inflow and outflow, but this is also useless without a comparison. (Boyesen, admittedly, are the exception with percentage claims and, seemingly, Team Kawasaki to back their claim).

 

I'm sure that brands who can demonstrate genuine superiority using 'the scientific method' and not simply throwing out "weasel words" will, themselves, perform much better by flying off the store shelf...

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is a valuable article and helps lay out the options available for readers needing cooler engines.  As it stands though it's only a "buyers guide" and doesn't take the next step towards objective evaluation and data as mentioned in an earlier comment.  I realize that takes time and resources ... but it's what got dirt bike started and really adds value for readers with this need.  I still remember super hunky's article evaluating engine oils ... with the picture of an oil can and a straw coming out of it!  Keep up the good work and please consider a followup article that adds objective evaluation!

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Whenever a unqualified person writes an article there is potential for error, because the writer can't separate the sources who know what they are talking about from those who don't.  I actually have an engineering degree, and have testified in court as an expert, so I have a better understanding of technical matters than most.  I have also been working on motorcycles since 1963.

 

This article has many problems.  For example, we want a coolant that transfers heat quickly, and has a capacity for holding a large amount of heat.  This article does not tell you that water is better at both than the stuff we have to pay for.   This means that if you use one of these fluids, your engine will not cool as well.

 

Does it mention that the radiator cap maintains a pressure in the cooling system in order to raise the boiling point of the coolant in order to prevent boiling?  

 

The writer talks about cavitation, but is off the mark.  A flowing fluid has energy in the form of velocity and pressure.  If it speeds up the pressure goes down.  The maximum speed will be at the propeller or impeller, so the pressure will be the lowest there and there is a chance for the liquid to vaporize momentarily.  As the fluid slows down the bubbles implode and sometimes cause damage.   They do not continue through the cooling system and affect cooling.

 

There was also a mention of a Boyesen article.   I read that and believe that the author doesn't understand.   When an engine is cold the temp sensor tells the brain so that the fuel/air mixture can be rich.  As the engine warms up the mixture is leaned out.

 

Did it ever occur to anyone that a cold engine will suck more heat out of the combustion chamber, thereby reducing power?  Cars used to have 160 degree thermostats, but newer cars have 192 degree thermostats, and there may be engines running hotter than that.  New cars are more efficient and produce more power per unit of displacment than older cars.   There is a connection.

 

Factory engineers take all of this stuff into account.  They specify the thermostat, and the type of coolant or coolant mix to use.   If you use something else, you might be making things worse without knowing it.

 

I don't have more time to spend on this.  Here are some useful links about cooling and coolants:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coolant

 

http://www.hotrod.com/how-to/engine/1307-glycol-or-water-coolant/

 

http://www.hotrod.com/how-to/engine/1307-glycol-or-water-coolant/

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

One item that wasn't taken into account here is the engine oil.  A quality synthetic will also help to keep your engine cooler.  I have discovered that Lucas synthetic oil will help to reduce the oil temp up to 25*, and it resists foaming more than most.

 

I have to agree on the Mishimoto radiators, they are the best in the business, for cars and bikes.  Their new line of oversized braced radiators is incredible.

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

How do you think that this Lucas oil reduces oil temperature?

 

Is it reducing friction that much?

 

Is it not absorbing heat from the engine parts, so that it stays cooler?

 

Is it transferring heat faster through the cases because it has a higher heat transfer  coefficient?

 

Or did Lucas just claim this and you believe it?

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Whenever a unqualified person writes an article there is potential for error, because the writer can't separate the sources who know what they are talking about from those who don't.  I actually have an engineering degree, and have testified in court as an expert, so I have a better understanding of technical matters than most.  I have also been working on motorcycles since 1963.

 

This article has many problems.  For example, we want a coolant that transfers heat quickly, and has a capacity for holding a large amount of heat.  This article does not tell you that water is better at both than the stuff we have to pay for.   This means that if you use one of these fluids, your engine will not cool as well.

 

Does it mention that the radiator cap maintains a pressure in the cooling system in order to raise the boiling point of the coolant in order to prevent boiling?  

 

The writer talks about cavitation, but is off the mark.  A flowing fluid has energy in the form of velocity and pressure.  If it speeds up the pressure goes down.  The maximum speed will be at the propeller or impeller, so the pressure will be the lowest there and there is a chance for the liquid to vaporize momentarily.  As the fluid slows down the bubbles implode and sometimes cause damage.   They do not continue through the cooling system and affect cooling.

 

There was also a mention of a Boyesen article.   I read that and believe that the author doesn't understand.   When an engine is cold the temp sensor tells the brain so that the fuel/air mixture can be rich.  As the engine warms up the mixture is leaned out.

 

Did it ever occur to anyone that a cold engine will suck more heat out of the combustion chamber, thereby reducing power?  Cars used to have 160 degree thermostats, but newer cars have 192 degree thermostats, and there may be engines running hotter than that.  New cars are more efficient and produce more power per unit of displacment than older cars.   There is a connection.

 

Factory engineers take all of this stuff into account.  They specify the thermostat, and the type of coolant or coolant mix to use.   If you use something else, you might be making things worse without knowing it.

 

I don't have more time to spend on this.  Here are some useful links about cooling and coolants:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coolant

 

http://www.hotrod.com/how-to/engine/1307-glycol-or-water-coolant/

 

http://www.hotrod.com/how-to/engine/1307-glycol-or-water-coolant/

 

Thx for your reply! 'bout time you shared some of that knowledge with the community! ;) The older, more experienced guys need to take the time to pass along good info/experience with the less experienced. Good for the longevity of the sport! :)

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

It sounds like a few of these methods of cooling are highly controversial, at least by some, and there are people who love them and who hate them. Rather than tell me what each does and why it works, I like to read real world results similar to a star rating system. 

 

I don't take manufacturer's or 'expert' words as gospel, but if there's 1000 people that use it, and 950 of them give it a 5/5 stars and claims it works as advertised, then maybe it does. 

 

Given that my coolant hasn't been replaced in years, my personal bike only has one radiator by manufacturer design and is probably due for a change, I had considered getting another product other than what I'd get from factory. 

 

I guess this gives me a start, but it would have been nice to have a show-down on what's the best or something. 

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

How do you think that this Lucas oil reduces oil temperature?

 

Is it reducing friction that much?

 

Is it not absorbing heat from the engine parts, so that it stays cooler?

 

Is it transferring heat faster through the cases because it has a higher heat transfer  coefficient?

 

Or did Lucas just claim this and you believe it?

 

And what does engine oil temperature have to do with the cooling system?

 

I have an oil temp gauge.  I was using Amsoil, and then under similar conditions using Lucas.  If you would bother to do your research instead of just knee jerk doubting you will find a number of reviews claiming the same thing.  I'm sure it has something to do with friction, friction is heat.  And you obviously know nothing about internal combustion engines, the oil is part of the cooling system.  Why do you think many vehicles have oil coolers?

 

xrtd-0016_b_12.jpg

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you read my post from July 14 you should realize that I know much more about engines than the average person.   My purpose in posting that was to help the average Joe.   For decades I have been reading incorrect articles in car, motorcycle, and aircraft magazines.  The writers don't know that they don't know what they are talking about, so they write stuff that is incorrect, and it gets published.   My question to you were designed to make people think about what is going on.  I am sorry that you were offended.

 

What we are up against is a lot of companies that want to sell us something which may or may not be good for us.   If we can think things through, then perhaps we can waste less money.

 

Here are the things from your post I wanted people to think about:   What does it mean when an oil is cooler?  How does that occur?  Where did the heat go?  What property of the oil makes it cooler?  It is a matter of understanding what is going on so we don't get bamboozled by someone blowing smoke.

 

 

By the way, I have been using synthetic oil since the 70's, but for lubrication, not for cooling.  The SAE book I have on synthetic oils says nothing about cooling benefits.

 

One last thing:   Although oil does help to take away heat, it has never been classified as part of the "cooling system".

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

One last thing:   Although oil does help to take away heat, it has never been classified as part of the "cooling system".

 

My very first teacher in auto shop back in the early 70s told us that the lubrication system was in fact part of the overall cooling system of the engine.  For 2 reasons, like I mentioned.  Oil can be cooled and friction is heat.  Its not my fault that you are underinformed.  It is in fact a vital part of the cooling system.

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nothing about a cooling fan? What about a remote overflow reservoir? The super high pressure rad caps are also scary. They are merely masking the problem, and potentially creating others. Manufacturers designated 1.1 bar as the optimal pressure for their cooling system. Install a thermostat and cooling fan that kicks on when you get into the tight technical areas where airflow decreases. The overflow allows your system to function just as it would in your car... cars have an overflow that allows coolant to expand and escape, then suck back in once the system cools off. That's what radiator caps are designed to do, only on our bikes we puke the coolant out to the ground and then the cap sucks air back in instead of air when things cool off.

 

There's no "cure all" product for every bike for every riding situation. You're gonna heat up. From MY personal experience, you don't see much of a difference in running Engine Ice vs a cheaper Maxima Coolanol. Run a temp gauge to know when you're getting too hot. I feel like the purpose of this article was to use some technical thermal dynamics science hock some sponsored product.

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites


Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


  • Similar Content

    • By Bturner
      I've seen alot or debating about this and been told both ways are better. I was hoping once and for all we can come up with a solid answer as to which is the better way to practice/race and why. I watch alot of races and I see the top guys doing both, but we all know we only get to see 5 min clips of GNCC's online so its hard to make an assumption. In the hare scrambles I've done I 've always noticed the A B riders come flying by standing up and hitting berms all the way down the trail standing up, but is this the way they ride the whole race? Some body help me become a better rider and let me know why I'm doing the right way!!
    • By jermag24
      I bought a 2009 KX450 last December and have about 20 hours of riding on it. I've had a few instances where the front end washed out on me, most seriously about a month ago which resulted in a separated shoulder. The bike came with a Dunlop MX51 (Intermediate terrain) on the rear and a Motoz Terrapactor (Soft Terrain) on the front. Both are like new but I've read mixed reviews on the Motoz tire since it has directional tread.
       
      The first time I was riding trails and wheelied up a long hill with whoops. When I brought the front wheel down it landed on a dry root crossing the trail at an angle and the front end slid out, I safely rolled off.
       
      The second time I was riding the track at VDR and it seemed I couldn't push my speed in tighter turns without the front end wanting to wash out. I stayed up but was pretty wiped from wrestling the bike around those turns.
       
      The last time I was going around a slower turn at Watkins and before I knew it, the front end must have caught a rut or washed out and I high-sided. I landed on my shoulder and separated it. Before I get back to riding I want to figure out what the deal is.
       
      My suspension is sprung and valved correctly for my weight and the clickers are set very close to stock settings. I run both tires at 13psi.
       
      As far as technique, I'm a pretty low-time MX rider but have years of trail riding under my belt. On the track, turning is probably my weakness. I've watched a few Semics videos and know to lean back when braking into the turn, then get my nuts up by the tank and my leg out when turning and accelerating out. I tend to lean forward when accelerating out of turns too. It seems I'm either fishtailing out or having to back off as the front end wants to slide out.
       
      Any suggestions on how I can get my skill/confidence up to ride MX with confidence again? Is it the tire or tire pressure to blame? Having a separated shoulder is NOT fun and I miss the hell out of riding. Thanks!
    • By Matriox HD
      I currently have a 250f and am thinking abou getting a 125 or 250 2 stroke. I don't have a lot of experience and I've never ridden a 2 stroke in my life. Thanks
    • By joey_243
      Just wanted some tips on riding ruts im fine with soft single sided ruts but pact double sided ruts just kill me during races any help please thankyou
    • By ukusa
      I'm a older slow rider looking for some technical riding skills advise , I ride a wr250 and the closest please to ride would be Rower fats.
×