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    MXEditor
    Off-road riding takes dedication, commitment...and money!! Lots of money for motorcycles, fuel, gear, parts, EZ-ups, coolers, emergency room visits, you name it...so most of us buy what we can afford and call it a day. 
    But what if you won the lottery? We've all seen the newer generation of "Toy Haulers" and they look amazing - that's what we'd be rolling up in. 
    We've decided to take a look at some the best (and expensive) premium toy haulers and give you something to think about. These aren't the "economy" or budget units here, no, these are the best of the best of the badass toy haulers that you would give your left nut to own!  
    So let's get beyond the basics and look at what you can get when you have a bank account like a Saudi sheik or US pharmaceutical executive! 
    What's inside these luxury toy haulers? We'd want these features at a minimum: 
    Amazing motorcycle/quad storage garage area with tool storage, full kitchen with refrigerator, stove and microwave, interior/exterior entertainment systems and restrooms with full sized showers and options like fireplaces, power awnings, on board fueling stations and skylights in the toilets! Let's get started!
     
    Grand Design Momentum Toy Hauler
    It's an incredible unit that features everything we've mentioned and can be kitted out for even more if your wallet permits like a fireplace and fueling station. Options abound with items like Rockford Fosgate stereo systems, king sized bed upgrades, electric bunks, massaging sofa's and home theater seating. Wow! This wild toy hauler features many different floor plans and various garage lengths up to 18 feet which was the largest we've seen so far. Checkout the pics...



     
    Action Mobil Global XRS 7200
    Have a cool $1.1m burning a hole in your pocket? Want to be able to haul your toys almost anywhere? The Action Mobil Global XRS 7200 6X6 is right up your alley! This Austrian honey weighs in at a massive 18 tons and is motivated by a 720hp diesel engine. Amenities include satellite TV, washer & dryer, and the best part... a fully integrated hydraulic lift to carry your bike! It even has big, chrome letters in the grill that reads, "MAN". If you're lacking, this unit will make up for it.


     
    Cyclone by Heartland
    Another amazing hauler, the Cyclone Series features a 13' garage area and sleeps up to 7 people. It has some cool packages and options for the cost is no object buyer including items like dual pane windows, rear electric awning and a 40" outdoor TV! 
    Heartland also offers the S5 package and it has even more cool stuff like a second  20 gallon fuel cell, 40" garage TV and massage chairs with USB ports...wow, we need that after those long days of riding. 




    Full House by DRV Suites
    Another wild luxury toy hauler, the Full House sleeps 7 and had the exterior graphics we thought really stood out, it's a very cool looking vehicle.  It also features garages up to 13.6' and ultra thick walls and floors, walk-in closets and things like an on-board fuel filling station! 
    This hauler had options to suit every taste and bank account including gourmet kitchens, hardwood steps, LED lighting, 55" TV's, rain sensors, keyless entry doors and home theater systems, you name it, it's available, amazing! 




    Last but not least is the Seismic by Jayco
    Jayco is well-known in the industry and they offer the Seismic which is their luxury toy-hauler offering that sleeps 8.   
    This hauler has tons of standard and optional features including heated sofa with massage, Simmons mattresses and a 23 cubic foot refrigerator!  
    Want more? How about 50" LED TV's, full speaker systems in garage area, Corian countertops and Bluetooth everywhere...is that luxurious enough? 



     
    In closing, if you have the cash you can buy the flash! These luxury toy-haulers are nicer than some people's homes and can be outfitted with just about anything you want except maybe a swimming pool or helicopter deck. 
    Money no object, which toyhauler would you buy ???   What feature(s) are really tripping your trigger?  Hit us up in the comments section below... we'd love to hear your thoughts!

     
     









    Chris Cooksey
    What a crazy day in California!  If you told me Tomac wouldn't win a Moto and Osborne would win with 4-2 Moto finishes I would have called you crazy.  I am not sure if the stars have aligned or what crazy karma is going around, but as soon as any series in 2017 looks to have a clear favorite everything gets flipped upside down.  The only thing you can count on is it's not over until it's over.

    My employer, Wester Power Sports is a headline sponsor for the Outdoor Nationals which allowed me exclusive access to the event as both a media and employee.  My day started at 4:30am when I left Vegas for the 3.5 hr. trek to Glen Helen.  As an employee I needed to arrive there early to sort tickets for my dealers attending and also help setup our Wester Power Sports VIP area.  As media personnel I hoped to take advantage of this early time to speak with riders and industry professionals.  While in line at Will Call I ran into Tyler “The Bear” Bowers, who I know from the Pulpmx show.  I congratulated him and his wife Brady as they are expecting their first child.  I asked him if he had any plans to race outdoors.  He made it clear he had been riding a 450 and is in great shape.  I got the impression he was making sure teams knew he was available if anyone needed a fill in rider.   It looks as Honda will need one now (Christian Craig is out with a broken hand), maybe “The Bear” will get a call.
    From there I hit up our Fly Racing Activation Booth where Ex-Pro Racer and Fly Racing Specialist, Jeff “NorCal” Northrop was doing his thing talking with the public about the benefits and features of Fly Gear and bench racing.  The 2018 Fly Gear is the best gear Fly has ever produced and will be released soon.  On the way back to the VIP tent I ran into the legendary Chuck Sun.  I introduced him to my friends from Carter Powersports.  Chuck is one of a kind, he may be close to 60 years old but still looks and acts like a young 35.  In all his years Chuck has never missed out on a good time!
    I walked around the track marveling at how big the jumps, ruts and braking bumps were.  TV does not do Glen Helen any justice.  The hills are extremely steep, you almost need climbing gear to get up and down them.  In the post race press conference all three 450 podium finishers openly discussed their views of how frightening it was to ride down the hills.  After my stroll around the track I headed back to the VIP area to watch some racing.  First up was the 450 LCQ where we cheered on our own Fly Racing rider Austin Kouba as he fought for his spot on the gate.

    While viewing the qualifying races, I turned around and there was Grant Langston chilling in our tent.  I thought it was cool to have him with us, as he was live on TV in 30 minutes.  Grant is truly a man of the people.  At this point I felt slightly overwhelmed as we had Andrew Short, Damon Bradshaw “Beast from the East,” and Connor Fields (BMX Gold Medal winner in Río) in our tent.  I did have a funny moment with Bradshaw.  I walked up to him and said, “I am sorry, but I am going to have to ask you to leave.  A guy by the name of Matiasevich said you can't be in here.”  He looked at me like he was instantly ready to fight, before quickly realizing I was joking.  He then responded, “If he {Matiasevich} is in here, these tables are going to get flipped over!”  I laughed.  Langston and Connor Fields chatted for quite a while.  Remember Connor Fields name as he will most likely be a TV personality after the next Olympic Games, his charisma is undeniable.
    During the 450 press conference I fell victim to Jason Weigandt’s peer pressure.  I would just as well leave, “there was no crown” attention in the past but he convinced me with Eli having problems, this was the perfect situation to bring it up again.  I did and it went about as well as the Hindenburg flight.   I also asked Jason Anderson about his altitude issues and what he was planning to get through Lakewood.  He quickly stated he was flying in the morning of the race and flying out as soon as it concludes.  He seemed annoyed that I asked the question, which makes me believe he is concerned about the issue.
    At the press conference I asked Jeremy Martin about his bike and how much it had changed since his first ride on the Geico Honda. He ducked my question so bad that Jimmy Albertson actually chuckled.  I think he felt embarrassed and sought me after to explain.  He told me he wanted to be careful not to say anything negative about the team but the bike is night and day different than when he first raced it at the 2016 Glen Helen GP.  He was careful with his words because he has such a high respect for the team and is very appreciative of their hard work making the bike better.  He also confirmed they are getting a new 250 chassis for 2018 and he won't be riding it as he is moving to the 450.  I appreciated his honesty.

    From there I headed to my truck and made the drive back to Vegas.  A day in the dirt and dust can wear you down, but seeing how fast these guys go on these brutal tracks is nothing short of amazing.  If you get the chance I strongly recommend attending in person, TV doesn’t do the outdoors justice.


















    Bryan Bosch
    Revolutionary TE 250i/300i Fuel-Injected Machines Headline Seven Model 2018 Enduro Line-Up
    May 30, 2017 – (Motor Sports Newswire) – Adding a significant benchmark to their timeline for model year 2018, Husqvarna Motorcycles introduce the next generation of 2-stroke machines – the all-new, fuel-injected TE 250i and TE 300i. Offering unprecedented advantages in terms of performance, rideability, fuel consumption and ease of use, the introduction of fuel-injection by Husqvarna Motorcycles is a bold new step into the future of offroad motorcycling.

    ogether with the fuel-injected 2-strokes, Husqvarna Motorcycles present a heavily updated range of TE and FE machines for model year 2018. Collecting feedback from top-level competition and combining it with extensive research, the brand’s engineers ensured that the 2018 TX 125, FE 250, FE 350, FE 450 and FE 501 remain true to Husqvarna Motorcycles’ commitment to offer premium motorcycles across their enduro range.

    NEW GENERATION 2-STROKES
    Perfectly embodying Husqvarna’s pioneering spirit, the new from the ground up fuel-injected TE 250i and TE 300i machines feature engine technology that revolutionises the field of 2-stroke enduro motorcycles. Featuring a pair of fuel injectors positioned at the transfer ports, the new system delivers the perfect amount of fuel into the engine at all times, across all conditions. Offering a significant reduction in fuel consumption and emissions, it also provides a smooth and clean power delivery on both machines.
    With the injectors delivering the fuel mixture downwards into the transfer port, the system ensures a much more efficient combustion. Carefully placed at the rear of the cylinder, a special tube relays intake pressure data to the new ECU. Gathering information from the throttle position sensor, the air and intake pressure sensors, together with the crankcase pressure and water temperature sensors, the ECU automatically compensates for temperature and altitude changes eliminating the need to modify carburettor jetting.
    Vital for internal engine lubrication, the 2-stroke oil is stored in a separate tank thus eliminating the need for pre-mixing. With its filler tube running through the frame, the 0.7 lt tank contains oil for five full tanks of fuel depending on conditions. Controlled by the EMS the oil pump delivers the ideal amount of oil reducing waste as well as excessive smoke.
    TE 250i/300i FUEL INJECTION HIGHLIGHTS
    => Fuel injectors at the transfer ports → Ideal amount of fuel in all conditions
    => Oil pump & oil tank → Convenient, eliminates pre-mix
    => 39 mm throttle body → Regulates air flow, TPS relays airflow data
    => New EMS → Modern engine management, no need for jetting changes
    => Standard map select → Customise power characteristics
    => Frame integrated oil filler cap → Simple refills
    => Translucent fuel tank → Large capacity, fuel pump integrated
    => New intake snorkel → Adapted to throttle body
    A COMPLETE LINE-UP
    Combining the most advanced engine technology with a series of dynamic upgrades, all Husqvarna Motorcycles 2-stroke and 4-stroke machines set the benchmark in terms of handling, power, weight and aesthetics.
    Developed by WP Performance System the front forks are specifically designed for enduro riding. For MY18, the forks feature new outer tubes offering improved flex characteristics and reduced friction. A stiffer setting also provides extra sensitivity and improved bottoming resistance.
    Also new for MY18 are the Magura front and rear brake systems. Featuring a similar layout to the design used on previous model Husqvarna enduro bikes, each system features optimal sensitivity and a progressive feel while retaining the highest level of performance. Second to none in terms of functionality and style, the new ProTaper handlebars feature class-leading fatigue resistance while adding minimal weight.
    MY18 ENDURO HIGHLIGHTS (ALL MODELS)
    => WP Xplor 48 front fork → new fork tubes & setting for added sensitivity & bottoming resistance
    => Magura brake callipers & GSK discs → Excellent sensitivity & progression
    => New ProTaper handlebar → Class-leading function & style
    The new Husqvarna MY18 enduro range will be available worldwide from July 2017 onwards at all authorised Husqvarna Motorcycles Dealers. For all details on pricing and availability, please refer to your national Husqvarna Motorcycles Subsidiary or Importer.
    The Media Kit with the complete technical information and the full Image gallery will be released on June 26, 2017.
    Husqvarna Motorcycles. Tradition on two wheels since 1903.
    Husqvarna Motorcycles are widely known and respected in the off-road world for a heritage of competition and numerous motocross and enduro world championships. Originally founded in Sweden in 1903, Husqvarna Motorcycles have been designed and manufactured in Mattighofen, Austria since 2013.
    Source: Husqvarna Motorcycles GmbH

    Bryan Bosch
    FMF Racing has announced a partnership with Husqvarna that will see one lucky participant take home a brand new TC 125 during the FMF Triple Crown Series Dream Race. Starting at Hangtown the FMF Triple Crown will take place prior to Moto 1 of the Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship and then be followed up with round two at Lakewood and then ending in Washougal. The FMF Husqvarna will be awarded to one lucky winner that competes in all three FMF Triple Crown events. FMF will randomly select a rider at Washougal during the final round of the Dream Race series. 

    With FMF Racing being founded upon 2-Stroke racing in 1973 and Husqvarna being one of the oldest motorcycle manufacturers, and the first company to ever produce a purpose-built off-road bike, Husqvarna Motorcycles have always been a great advocate of 2-stroke technology. The Husqvarna TC 125 is the perfect machine of choice for outdoor motocross merriment; suited for the future Pro Motocross star and the playful local track terrain-challenger. For complete contest rules please refer to www.125dreamrace.com and follow @fmf73 @fmf.125.triplecrown for all the action. 

    About FMF Racing:
    Established in 1973, FMF Racing is one of the most dominant and influential brands in the world of Off-Road Motocross Racing. Founded by Don Emler in his Hawthorne, CA garage, the brand’s steadfast dedication to supporting the sport, along with its athletes and partners, has earned the respect and loyalty of industry consumers and insiders.  From cutting-edge design to efficient manufacturing, sourcing, marketing, operations and distribution, FMF strives to elevate performance in every facet of the business. FMF Racing’s iconic red-and-yellow logo is still fueling the growth and passion for the sport of motocross more than 40 years later. The family-owned and operated company also features top level world-class race teams that continue to dominate the podium at events around the globe. For more information, visit www.fmfracing.com.
    Chris Cooksey
    Congratulations to Ryan Dungey on his highly successful racing career!   He will go down as one of the all-time greats in the sport of Motocross and Supercross.  While the sport is beneficial with Dungey’s participation, the sport will survive without it.  After hearing his retirement speech, at his personal press conference, I am curious to see how he handles retirement.  Retirement for professional athletes can be tough.  Athletes define themselves by their skills and Dungey's entire life has been dedicated to the goal of winning.  Once winning is no longer an athlete’s sole goal in life, depression can take hold.  The identity of their professional self dies and they are forced to reinvent themselves.  In the heat of the moment Dungey probably wished he was normal and didn't have the intense pressure or stress anymore.  While this is true, he will still miss the adoration of so many fans.  He will never be able to recreate the feeling of crossing the line to win a Supercross Championship.  His life will be full of great joy and good times but the feeling of being Champion cannot be replicated.

    Ryan Dungey will be remembered as one of the hardest working and determined riders in the sport’s history.  This skill will help him moving forward or it will be his downfall.  Unfortunately, professional athletes are not held to normal societal rules and many are socially inept.  They are so used to everything being geared towards them and their goals.   In retirement they are expected to instantly become regular people.  They no longer receive special treatment or have an entire team geared toward assisting them reach their goals.  They lose many “friends” who were there to feed off their fame and fortune.  This is devastating to their psyche.  Dungey will need to learn how to widen his focus.  The tunnel vision required to be a Champion can alienate an athlete in regular society.  Retiring athletes often have an identity crisis when it all ends.  During their careers they have a team of people helping them focus and move forward.  When they retire this giant support system shrinks to a few people and things can feel lonely.

    In the next couple years Ryan and Lindsay will be challenged in their relationship.  The divorce rate for professional athletes upon retirement is extremely high, their relationship dynamic will completely change.  I have heard many people say, “He is rich and has a hot wife, life is good!”  While this is true many professional Motocross racers don't have the money to sit back and reflect.  Ryan has the money to allow the nothingness of retirement set in.  Ryan doesn't need to enter the regular workforce and will have a lot of time on his hands.  Ryan will have to find a new motivation for getting up in the morning, much like Kevin Windham.  He might want to give Windham a call and allow Windham to explain the emotional roller coaster that lies ahead, and unlike his professional career this will be played out in private.
    While we celebrate Ryan Dungey and his historic career achievements, I am concerned for him as a human being.  I don't think Ryan will go very far from the sport, he has too much to offer.   Hopefully he will make the transition and embrace his new life in whatever role he chooses.  RD5 is no longer his identity, he is now Ryan from Minnesota.  I personally appreciated Dungey this season as this was my first season in the Supercross media and he made it very memorable.  He answered my press conference questions honestly and didn’t hide his emotions.  I took a lot of heat after Glendale, but I wouldn't have it any other way.  He showed his human side, something he never showed earlier in his career.  

    If you want a perfect example of the struggles an athlete goes through upon retirement, check out the documentary State of Play: Happiness.  
    (Photos by LC)

    jamesm113

    By jamesm113, in Articles,

    Carb Mods
    The recommended baseline jetting seems to a #38 pilot and a #130 main.  The TTR230's come with a TK (Teikei) carb stock and jets are somewhat difficult to find.  Stock jetting is a #36 pilot, a #125 main and a 5C20 needle.
    Pilot Jets - Yamaha Part Numbers
    #36 - 1C6-14342-18-00 (stock)
    #36 - 43F-14342-18-00 (obsolete)
    #38 - 43F-14342-19-00
    #38 - 43F-14342-68-00 (obsolete)
    Main Jet Size - Yamaha Part Numbers - TK Part No
    #122 - 288-14343-61-00
    #125 - 288-14343-63-00 (stock)
    #130 - 288-14343-65-00
    #135 - 288-14343-68-00
    #140 - 288-14343-70-00
    #146 - 288-14343-73-00
    #156 - 288-14343-78-00
    #160 - 288-14343-80-00
    Links:
    JetsRUs Teikei Main Jets: http://jetsrus.com/a_jets_by_carburetor_type/jets_teikei_main_hex_3T.html
    JetsRUs Teikei Pilot Jets: http://jetsrus.com/a_jets_by_carburetor_type/jets_teikei_slow_3U.html
    Yamaha Parts: http://www.partzilla.com/parts/search/Yamaha/Motorcycle/1985/TRIALS+-+TY350N/CARBURETOR/parts.html
     
    Chris Cooksey
    The 2017 Monster Energy Supercross Series is officially over.  Ryan Dungey clinched the Championship and I cannot remember another series more entertaining.  Obviously, I have to start with the 450 class and what could have been Ryan Dungey’s last Supercross race.  Going into the 2017 season all the talk centered on Ken Roczen and his new Honda, and Roczen did not disappoint.  He came out swinging in the first two rounds, winning the opener and out dueling Dungey in San Diego.  San Diego appeared to be the start of many storylines.  Dungey showed us he wasn't going down without a fight, and then ar A2 Roczen experienced his horrific crash and subsequent injury.  At this point message boards and industry insiders all speculated Dungey was on cruise control to his 4th title.  Eli Tomac was a favorite entering the series but after struggling for the first three rounds everybody was speculating about his bike, fitness and mental status.  Whatever he was battling in the first three rounds he quickly fixed, and the Glendale SX began Eli’s domination.  Where Eli dominated, Dungey's foundation began to crack.  In the postrace press conference Dungey broke character and let loose on me!
    Looking back it is clear Dungey’s motivation entering the 2017 season appeared to be aimed at Roczen.  When Roczen became injured , Dungey lost his motivation and was reminded of his mortality (similar to Rick Johnson the year after David Bailey became paralyzed).  But Dungey is not a champion by accident. While battling inner demons and a noticeable burnout he still maintained consistency and managed his point lead.  As many champions do, Dungey has established a ridiculous expectation from fans and media.  Anything less than a win had fans and media questioning, “What's wrong with Dungey?”  The season stress only increased for Dungey and he looked like he was ready to wave the white flag after Salt Lake City.  This shifted all pressure directly to Eli and it became his championship to lose.  Like Ricky Carmichael said, “the red plate pressure” had Eli floundering in East Rutherford.  Even if Marvin Musquin didn't pull over for Dungey in East Rutherford Ryan was leaving with the points lead heading into the final round in Las Vegas.

    Marvin Musquin pulling over and basically handing KTM and Dungey 3 points in East Rutherford could have turned into a poor strategic move by KTM.  Heading into Vegas, Dungey had a 9 point lead, and Musquin’s move justified in any tactics Eli chose in his attempt to claim the Championship.  From the pre-race press conference it was clear Tomac wasn't going down without a fight.  I spoke with some industry insiders and told them I thought Eli would get dirty if needed and they scoffed at the idea.  They assumed Kawasaki didn’t want the title in that way.  I disagreed and during an event with Andrew Short I asked him his thoughts.  Andrew replied, “I wouldn't want to hurt him, but yea you have to take a shot.”  Eli not only took a shot, he took three!  He slowed the race pace and if not for Jason Anderson acting as Dungey's wingman Eli’s plan might have worked.  When the pace slowed, Chad Reed sensed a chance to win.  Reed does not care about other’s agendas or any championship in which he can't win and saw an opportunity to grab a win.  Luckily for Dungey his wingman straight t-boned Reed ending his shot at being the oldest rider to ever win a Monster Energy Supercross.  Eli made one last Hail Mary attempt by letting Dungey pass in order to try and take him out.  In the process this allowed Anderson to squeak past and steal the race win.  Dungey realized he had a big gap back to 5th place and stopped taking Eli’s bait.  Dungey became the 2017 Monster Energy Supercross Champion in what was likely his last Supercross race, even though he declined to announce as he had previously promised.

    The Dave Coombs Sr. Memorial East/West Shootout may have been the best race I have ever seen and Supercross winner David Vuillimin agreed.  Here is Vuillimin’s tweet after the race: “I've just witnessed the best SX race in history... #CongratsZacho.”   Typically the press box is reserved, with cheering and yelling at a minimum.  When Zach caught Joey Savatgy and made the pass the press box erupted, not because they were fans of Osborne but because we all realized we had just seen a race that will be talked about for years to come.  Zach's performance was one that parents will reference when teaching their kids discipline and the importance of never giving up.  As bad as Savatgy has to feel, he was part of a historic race that will remembered for a long time.  As exciting as the race was it was equally disappointing for both Savatgy and Jordan Smith who both were in positions to win the Championship.  Savatgy appears to have something going on with him mentally.  He reminds me of Chuck Knoblauch, the second baseman for the Yankees who forgot how to throw to first base: (https://honesthypnosis.com/2013/03/what-really-happened-to-chuck-knoblauch/).  Hopefully Savatgy can get this corrected.  I was also glad to hear Smith was alright after his frightening crash heading into the stadium.  He smashed into the side of the track going about 70mph and that easily could have been life altering.

    The sport of Supercross is the most exciting form of Motorsports!  I will argue this with anyone who is up for a debate.  Supercross is changing the format for next year, at least there are serious discussions about making changes.  The changes I want to see have to do with the rule book and how rules are enforced, but I have a different article for that, here is a link to Part 1: https://www.thumpertalk.com/articles/john-gallagher-bottom-line-it-ends-with-me-r671/
     










    Chris Cooksey
    Tomac needs to get dirty!

    With Las Vegas left in the 2017 Monster Energy Supercross series, countless storylines are still in development.  The most important is The 450 Championship.  Eli Tomac needs to win which would require Ryan Dungey to finish 5th or worse, and that's the simple version.  Looking closer at last week’s race we find a frustrated and even angry Eli Tomac.  Typically when racing one of the sports all-time greats, you want to maintain a clean and respectful race.  After KTM took their gloves off last week, having Marvin Musquin pull over and hand Dungey the win, the door is wide open for Tomac to play dirty.  KTM cast the first stone, unfortunately if Tomac takes Dungey out in spectacular form, he will definitely take heat.  KTM is playing with a loaded deck in Vegas.  Eli is battling Dungey, Musquin, Millsaps, Baggett, Anderson and Wilson.  That is 5 guys that will move out of Dungey's way in order to get Dungey into the top 4.  Eli might have placed himself in this situation with his “choke job” in East Rutherford, despite the controversial “team orders.”  If this was Carmichael, Reed, Johnson, Hannah or Villopoto they all would be planning an attack against Dungey.  Is Tomac willing to get dirty to win the most prestigious MX/SX championship in the world?  If Tomac decides to execute this strategy he can only become more popular.  Tomac is single handily taking on the current evil empire of Supercross (KTM/Husqvarna) and not many would blame him for fighting the bully using dirty tactics.  I think Eli will take a shot at Dungey on Saturday night.

    In the 250 class team tactics could also get out of control.  With the East and West Regions combined, and the West already claimed by Josh Hill, a group of riders are vulnerable to being forced to “help” their teammates.  We all know the Pro Circuit Kawasaki team isn't shy about using team tactics.  I guarantee KTM and Husqvarna won't be shy about using their guys either as this is the only time any Supercross Championship has been a winner take all finale with 3 riders.  Joey Savatgy is likely to be the guy with the most teammates at his disposal, but Hill is looking for a 450 ride.  I don’t think Hill will risk angering a future employer.  Adam Ciancirulo is still alive in the championship.  Austin Forkner is still looking for his first win, would he sacrifice that for Hill?  Let's not forget Tyler Bowers isn't Savatgy’s teammate this year and even though Bowers hasn't been a top guy this year his disdain for Joey Savatgy has not subsided.  Bowers has mentioned on multiple occasions that he would love to get a shot at Savatgy.  Jordan Smith has a couple of good teammates in Shane Mcelrath and Mitchell Oldenburg.  Both guys appear to be team players and would sacrifice their race so TLD KTM can earn their first championship.  Zach Osborne has been the fastest guy in the East and should be able to win this outright with no help.  His teammate Martin Davalos should be willing to help Zach, but at times Davalos looks more like a human torpedo on the track.  His best offering might be staying out of Zach’s way.

    Don't miss the race on Saturday night!  This season will be dissected for years to come.  2017 is Dungey's last season (maybe) along with Roczen’s too (I hope not).  This will be the last year with the modern format.  We will see many changes coming in 2018, whether it's a Chase Format, a 2 moto format or something new.  This will be the last series under the current format and no matter how Saturday ends it has been one for the ages!
     
     





    grayracer513
    Timing, they say, is everything, and that’s particularly true with engines.  Understanding how and when the individual events happen, and why they happen when they do will help you understand why they have to be set up as they are, and that always makes it easier to figure out what’s going on when problems arise.
    Let’s start by going over the basic way the engine works, and what events need to occur and when.  First, we’ll look at the simple basics, then at the reason things happen exactly when they do.  To simplify the discussion, and to make it more closely relevant to dirt bikes, we are only going to discuss single cylinder engines during this explanation. 
    The term, “four-stroke cycle” means that the engine needs to move the piston up or down the bore 4 times to complete all the functions that go into producing power from gasoline.  Because the piston is connected to the crank via the connecting rod, each “stroke” takes a half revolution of the crank, or two full revolutions for the four necessary strokes. 
    The Four-Stroke Cycle
    A lot of folks have seen this simplified version, but let's review. The cycle starts with the Intake Stroke, near top dead center (TDC), where the piston is at its highest possible position, with the intake valve opening and the piston moving down the bore toward bottom dead center (BDC).  This creates a void above the piston that is filled by air from outside rushing in through the intake port to fill it, and that air carries with it the fuel added by either the carburetor or a fuel injection system.
    The rotating crank then begins to move the piston up the bore and the intake valve closes, trapping the fuel and air in the cylinder.  As the piston continues upward, the air/fuel mix is compressed, which heats it and increases the amount of force with which it will expand when ignited.  This is the compression stroke. 
    The power stroke begins near the top of that second stroke, when ignition takes place, starting the fire.  The crank rotates past TDC as the burning fuel begins to expand, and the combustion force pushes the piston down the bore, creating the rotating force on the crank that drives the whole works.  
    As the piston nears BDC again, the exhaust valve opens, and the piston is run up the bore to pump the spent gasses out through the exhaust port to complete the cycle with the exhaust stroke. 
    Half Speed
    Notice something here: The engine’s crankshaft rotated twice to produce four trips up and down the cylinder for the piston, but each valve only opened and closed once during that time.  To make this work, the camshafts have to turn at one half the engine speed, so the chain and sprockets, or gears, or toothed belt and sprockets used to drive them are set up at a 2:1 ratio. 
    Ignition also has to happen right on time, so each ignition system, whether simple ‘50’s style points, or the most sophisticated electronic, has to have something to signal when that is. Traditionally, this signaling trigger has been attached to the camshaft so that the spark occurred only once every other revolution, but engineers seeking to simplify the design of single cylinder dirt bikes found no reason that there could not be a spark on every revolution, so the trigger sensor was mounted at the crankshaft instead.  That means there is a spark on every revolution, instead of only once per each two-revolution cycle of the engine. The second spark happens at the end of the exhaust stroke, so there’s nothing present in the cylinder that would burn.  It also makes setting up the timing during assembly somewhat simpler by eliminating what used to be a common mechanic’s mistake of picking the wrong top dead center position.
    Getting Ahead of Things (The Engine is Dynamic)
    Simplified explanations of the cycle like the one we started with here always show the valves opening and closing right at TDC and BDC, but if you watch the piston position as you turn an engine over by hand to watch the valve gear operate, you will notice that the valves don’t open and close at the exact top and bottom of their respective strokes. That’s because the engine is a dynamic system, which means it’s something that moves, and it does so at a pretty high speed. Most MX 450’s make peak power at around 9000 RPM,  which means they make two full revolutions and complete an operating cycle in about 13 milliseconds at that speed.  The crank spins continuously, but the intake, exhaust, and combustion all stop and start again while that’s going on.  That means that all of these events actually have only a certain amount of time in which to occur, so they have to be started in advance so that they happen on time.  Again, we’ll look at the intake stroke first. 
    With the crankshaft spinning along at a few thousand revolutions per minute, if we were to wait until top dead center to open the intake valve, the piston will travel well down in the bore by the time the valve is open wide enough to let much air into the cylinder, so the intake valve begins to open around 20 degrees or more before top dead center (BTDC).  This does a couple of things.  For one, the exhaust stroke is just ending, and the inertia of the spent gasses leaving the cylinder creates a bit of a vacuum that helps get the intake air moving in.  There’s a little bit of built up pressure right behind the intake valve as a result of the intake valve having been slammed shut on a moving column of air at the end of the previous intake stroke, and that helps, too.  But mainly, we want the intake valve to have time to be open nice and wide as the piston moves through the fastest part of its down stroke so we can get the cylinder as full as possible.  On top of that, we’re going to keep the intake valve open until well after bottom dead center (ABDC) to take advantage of the inertia of the incoming air.
    Which brings us to the compression stroke.  The piston is now rising and pushing against the load of incoming air, stalling the flow into the cylinder, so the intake valve closes as this balance is struck, about 130 degrees BTDC.  With both valves now closed, the piston compresses the air and fuel mix to less than 1/10th its original volume to heat it up and to increase the force with which it expands as it burns.  This compression will continue until TDC, but the ignition has to happen well before that in order to extract the maximum power from the burning of fuel.
    The Power stroke, then, is initiated before the piston actually starts down.  This “spark advance” allows the burning gasoline time to start at one small point near the spark plug and spread across the combustion chamber to the point where it becomes confined by the piston and must push it down out of the way.  That’s where the power comes from.  If the spark occurs too late (is “retarded”), the piston will outrun the fuel burn and not much pressure will be applied.  On the other hand, if it happens too early (“advanced”) then too much pressure will be created while the piston can’t get out of the way fast enough, which leads to damage from detonation and the like.  The faster the engine turns, the more advance the ignition needs to keep up, so modern systems advance the timing as the RPM increases.
    At about 120-130 degrees ATDC, the energy from the fuel burn is so low that it really isn’t putting a lot of force on the piston any more, and the leverage that the piston has on the crank is getting pretty low, so the exhaust valve starts open before reaching BDC.  The pressure that remains from the burn starts the gasses flowing outward, boosted by the piston as it rises and pumps the bore clear.  The exhaust valve remains open past TDC to utilize gas inertia and help restart the intake airflow for the next cycle. 
    Am I 180 Out?
    People ask this a lot when they have trouble getting an engine running after they’ve set the cam timing up, or when they bring the piston up to Top Dead Center and find both valves open.  This is the common mistake we mentioned earlier, and it's one of the things that's more easily understood when you have a good grasp of the complete cycle.  It’s more of a car thing, but if you have an old classic four-stroke from the ‘70’s or before that uses cam driven breaker points, it’s sometimes possible.  These days, the answer is usually, “no.”  The old way of connecting the ignition to the engine mechanically, that of using a distributor or some other device driven at half speed by the cam, allows a mistake in assembly to be made.  A mechanic could position the engine at TDC, and if not careful to check, he could position the ignition trigger to fire during the exhaust stroke instead of the compression stroke.  This was referred to as being “180 degrees out” because the distributor or point plate was 180 degrees away from the correct position on the camshaft because of this. Actually, going by the crank, the ignition timing was 360 degrees out.
    But with the ignition trigger located on the crankshaft instead, as is the case with virtually all modern single cylinder dirt bike 4 strokes, that’s not possible.  Without the cams connected to the crank, one TDC is exactly like another; the rod’s at the top, and the spark signal is given as the crank gets there, every time.  So, the only thing that determines which stroke is which is the camshaft(s), and how they are positioned by the assembler.  That’s why the service manuals for such engines make no mention of checking for which of the two different TDC’s is used.  In operation, there is a second, "wasted" spark that happens near the end of the exhaust stroke. 
    What About Automatic Decompression?
    This is another area where really understanding the four-stroke cycle helps clear things up.  It's extremely common to hear people tell someone with a modern four-stroke single to "find TDC" before starting, but that's wrong.  When you turn the engine over slowly, you find it rotates fairly easily until you come to a "hard spot".  Without auto decompression, the hard spot is the point at which the intake valve closes to begin the compression stroke.  That looks like the picture below, "Non AD".             
    From this point, you would need to force the engine to compress about 80% of it's full stroke length worth of air, and that can be nearly impossible with the high compression ratios used these days.  What automatic decompression does is use a speed sensitive mechanical system to lift the exhaust valve off its seat at very low speeds (slower than the engine will idle at) until the engine gets a lot closer to TDC, but not past it, so that when kicked over from this position (or spun through it by a starter motor) there will still be enough compression to start, and both valves will be closed as the spark happens and the end passes top dead center.  That looks like the "Auto Decomp" picture above.  You can see that there will be a lot less effort needed to compress the air/fuel charge from here than from the normal, non auto decompression setup.  This, by the way, is where you want to be if you have an older manual decompression engine.  If you go past TDC instead of stopping just prior to it, you would have to kick the engine through nearly two full revolutions to get back to the compression stroke again, and it would still be at full strength.
    Once you have the whole picture set in your mind, you'll make fewer assembly mistakes, and you'll be able to catch on to problems more quickly.  A crusty old  mechanic told me a long time ago, "The best way to figure out why something works wrong is to know how it's works when it works right".
     








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