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crf450l Full Review of the 2019 Honda CRF450L Dual Sport


Bryan Bosch

Updated 09/25/2018

Recently, American Honda invited me out to Packwood, Washington to ride the 2019 CRF450L, one of the most hotly anticipated new motorcycle model releases in recent memory. I’ve been reading posts for years from riders begging the Japanese manufacturers to bring them a modern, performance oriented dual sport motorcycle, and I too was happy when I learned that Honda had stepped up. Increased competition means better bikes and more choices for us riders! :thumbsup:

CRF450L_preride.pngDespite our stickers all around, Honda didn't let me keep this 450L .:excuseme:

Our 106 mile test loop included a section of country highway, twisting back roads, gravel forest service roads, fast & flowing double track, and epic technical single track. Weather was cool & damp and we rode elevations from approximately 1,000 to 5,300ft.

CRF450L_route.png
106 Miles of Dual Sport happiness!

Our test bikes were stock except for the installation of Dunlop D606 DOT tires, suspension clicker adjustments for the conditions being ridden, and sag adjustment as necessary. I’m a 49 year old, off-road focused dual sport rider with 35+ years of recreational riding experience. I’m not always the fastest in the group, but I rarely bring up the back either.

What Type of Rider is the CRF450L Most Suited To?

I think Honda was pretty accurate by framing the 450L as a trail-to-trail, performance dual sport. No question that it leans more towards the true dirt side of the spectrum, but with enough comfort and refinement baked in to make your ride to the trailhead and connecting trails enjoyable. It’s docile enough for a developing rider with decent throttle & clutch skills to enjoy on mild to moderate single track, but still has the ability to satisfy accomplished riders who like to push in more demanding conditions. Our test group included a few very fast riders (including Johnny Campbell) and no one said that the bike was holding them back much, if at all. I certainly didn’t feel limited when pushing anywhere. What the 450L is not is a light-duty trail machine designed more for traveling distance on graded dirt roads or highway. It very well might just do that, but it certainly isn’t one of its core competencies, nor would it be my first choice for such. 

Does the CRF450L Have More Than the Rumored 25hp?

Oh, heck ya! Honda didn’t provide actual dyno numbers, but they estimated the 450L to be in the mid 40hp range. My butt dyno says that’s in the ballpark. It has enough oomph to keep things exciting, but not so much that you can get in trouble quickly when you're tired. No question that fire-breathing power can be fun, but for a long day in the saddle, the 450L power didn’t unnecessarily wear me out.

180911_drp_honda_crf450l_3012_web.jpg
Yeah, the CRF450L will wheelie. Photo by Drew Ruiz

Throttle response is crisp and power delivery is super smooth & completely linear to its 10,000 rpm redline (5th gear). Roll-on power lower in the RPM range is initially a tad soft, something fairly common with emission controlled dual sports. However, a downshift or handful of clutch produces pretty much instant boost. To be fair, I’m a bit of a short shifter, so riding the bike in lower gear at a little higher RPM kept the motor in the sweet spot of the power curve.

The 450L has a 12% heavier crank and a heavier clutch basket than the 2019 CRF450R, making the power very tractable and resistant to stalling. The 450L put the power down incredibly well, making for excellent traction despite running a little higher tire pressure than I prefer (15psi front & back). I did manage to stall the bike a few times, but I blame that more on my left hand and gear selection than the bike.

I asked Honda if the ECU could be remapped, but they were a little hesitant to dive into that pool. And, I understand why. I pressed them just a bit and they did say that the ECU can compensate to some degree, such as for an aftermarket exhaust and that an ECU remap may be possible. You’ll have to form your own conclusions.

Is the CRF450L Showa Suspension Any Good?

The 2019 CRF450L has the same, fully-adjustable Showa 49mm coil spring fork & Pro-link shock as its 450R & 450X cousins, but specifically tuned for performance dual sport riding. It’s sprung for around an 180lb. rider (fully geared) and Honda took into consideration that some riders will be adding additional weight with the installation of a rack or soft luggage and cargo. Since we're talking about cargo, the aluminium sub-frame extends the full length of the rear fender and while Honda didn't quote us a weight limit, I rode at least a 175lb. rider back to his bike. I suspect that it will handle pretty much whatever most riders will need to carry.

Fully geared up, including a full hydration bladder and trail incidentals, I’m right at 210lbs.. Despite being 30lbs. over the ideal spring weight, I thought that the 450L suspension worked incredibly well. Riding over washboard forest service roads at a pretty good clip, I took note of how planted and composed the bike remained. On the trails it soaked up rocks and roots well, and even square edged hits didn’t transmit harshly though the handlebars or upset the chassis. I also took note of how well the bike handled sections of stutter bumps, something that does a good job of exposing suspension weaknesses.

180911_drp_honda_crf450l_3085_web.jpg
Fun fast & flowing section of Pac NW single track. Photo by Drew Ruiz

On one of the higher-speed dirt roads, climbing up to a decommissioned fire outlook (Burley Mountain) were some awesome roller humps. I didn’t slow down for one in particular and when I was just about to lift off, I noticed that I was going to land in a dip on the other side. I figured that I was going to bottom out both ends, but to my surprise, the suspension fully soaked up the hit! Suffice to say, out-of-the box, I think that the 450L Showa suspension is highly effective, forgiving, and can only get better if sprung and valved for a rider’s weight, conditions, and skill level.

Does the CRF450L Feel Heavy?

I guess that depends upon what you’re use to. It feels noticeably lighter than my KTM 690 Enduro R, but not too much heavier than a KTM 450 EXC that I used to own or a KTM 450 XC-W that I rode this summer while in Colorado. Nowhere on the trail did I feel like I was wrestling a beast or fighting against the bike.

The 450L has a slightly longer wheelbase than the 450X for added stability on the road, but it still dropped into turns willingly and steered accurately. It didn’t take long for me to build confidence in the bike’s handling, trusting the front-end to stick and to start brake sliding into corners. The 450L is a very predictable handler, confidence inspiring, and fun to ride. I don't think it took more than an hour on the bike to feel right at home.

For those looking to save every ounce of weight, the biggest savings will probably come from an aftermarket exhaust, as the stainless silencer includes a catalytic converter to comply with emissions. It already comes with a light-weight Lithium battery, so there simply isn’t unnecessary weight just hanging around. Me? I wouldn't touch the stock exhaust and I'll cover why later in my review.

How’s the Gas Mileage?

The specs have been out on the 2019 CRF450L for a while now, so many have already shared their concerns about its 2 gallon fuel capacity. Obviously, mpg is going to vary by how you ride the bike and the conditions being ridden. Honda quoted an average mpg for mixed conditions of 50, so right at 100 miles per tank. While the digital dashboard doesn’t have a traditional fuel gauge that displays what you have left, it does tell you how much fuel you’ve consumed, how far you’ve ridden, and your average mpg for both trip A and trip B settings.

Admittedly, when we got back from the ride, I was pretty tired, soaked to the undies, and ready for a hot shower. So, I forgot to check how much fuel the bike had burned! :facepalm: What I do know is that approximately 2 gallons took me through 106 miles of epic Pac NW mountain roads & trails, I didn’t ride with fuel economy in mind, and I absolutely got my fill of riding that day.

For some riders, 2 gallons won’t be enough, so they’ll have to look to the aftermarket for a solution. I recently talked to Chris Harden, the GM at IMS Products and he confirmed that they’ll have an extra capacity tank ready in about 6 weeks. He further said that it should be between 3 to 3.2 gallons in capacity, have a screw cap and dry break option, and colors of black and natural. IMS will be sending me a 450L  tank to check out, so I’ll post up some pictures when it arrives. Curious to see where they found the extra room.

How’s the Gear Box & Clutch?

The 2019 CRF450L features a 6 speed wide-ratio transmission with fairly low 1st gear for tight conditions and a 6th with enough legs for highway speeds.

1st gear is usable in very slow, technical conditions, but the bike can feel a little jumpy at times because the fuel mapping is somewhat sensitive. If you have good throttle and clutch control it’s not a big deal, it's just something that I noticed while getting to know the bike. In terms of gear spacing, I think Honda did a good job with the ratios, not noticing any unexpected or annoying gaps.

I was able to get the 450L up to 80 mph on a longer back road (closed for safety of course ;)) and there was still more speed to be had. I don’t see an issue with the bike cruising at 65-70, 75ish for shorter runs, and 80-85ish when passing. The 450L doesn't have a tachometer, so I can’t say what the bike was turning at different speeds. But for the vast majority of traveling speeds, the bike isn't rapping out or feeling like you’re squeezing. I asked Honda for the 450L transmission gear ratios, but I'm still waiting on them. I'll add them here when they come in. Honda did say that at 65 mph, the engine is turning in the 6,000 rpm range.  ****Updated 09/25/18: Actual Gear Ratios***

Overall, I really enjoyed the 450L gearbox.  It’s very smooth to operate, it’s quiet, and despite being on an unfamiliar bike, I didn’t have a mis-shift the entire day. I wish my 690 transmission was this good honestly. As a point of reference, I wear size 10 boots and getting under the shift lever was no problem.

I was initially a little disappointed to see that the 450L doesn't have a hydraulic clutch, but I found lever pull to be smooth and light as far as cables go. The clutch perch has a manual adjuster wheel that works well, even with gloves on. We didn't ride hard enduro conditions, but there were sections of technical single track that required more aggressive clutching and I didn't notice any fading or chatter.  Both control levers are on the shorty side, something I prefer and both were effective with two fingers.

How are the CRF450L Brakes?

The 450L has a 260mm cross-drilled wave rotor up front that is squeezed by a Nissan 2-piston caliper. To meet DOT requirements, the front rotor is a thicker and the hydraulic reservoir carries more fluid. At the rear is a matching 240mm rotor and single piston caliper. No ABS is present at either end.

The front brake has good initial bite without being too grabby. I found it easy to modulate, fade free, and plenty powerful. The back brake was a little grabby, but I was just using it how I ride my 690. Once I adjusted my inputs it was fine and in short order I was brake sliding into corners like normal. The brakes were also able to haul the bike down from 70-80 mph on wet back roads with no drama.

Is the Seat Comfy?   

It’s a slim profile dirt bike seat with fairly firm foam that, for its intended purpose, it's fine. Compared to the range of MX and Enduro bikes that I've ridden, it's one of the more comfortable, but it's not XR650L comfortable for example. Surprisingly, I didn’t start to get uncomfortable until the last hour, hour and a half of the day, but we also rode a decent amount of stand-up terrain. I’m sure that the aftermarket will bring 450L comfort oriented seats to the market very soon. I did like the seat cover; it has good grip, even when riding in wet conditions.

Is the CRF450L Tall?

At 5’ 10” with a 32” inseam, I’m pretty close to reaching the ground with both feet flat. Considering all the different dirt bikes, dual sports, and ADV bikes that I’ve ridden, no, I don’t think that 450L is tall. It has the same amount of suspension travel as the CRF450R and X, but it’s a little heavier, so it sits slightly lower in the stroke.

For the first couple of road miles, I thought that the seat to peg room was going to feel a bit cramped, but that thought quickly disappeared as the miles increased. One thing that I did like was how the textured radiator shrouds give you more traction at the knees and their profile created the perfect "pocket" when scooching up on the tank for sit down corners. If Honda made the textured areas of the radiator shrouds out of a little softer (grippier) material, they'd be even better.

Are the Service Intervals Reasonable?

For 2019 CRF450L, Honda specifies 600 mile oil change intervals and 1,800 mile valve checks. For the intended purpose of this bike, I don't think that's unreasonable. For oil, that's a half a dozen rides just like our test loop and 18 of the same for valves. At least for me, that's a lot of run relative to the time and maintenance costs. And, Honda is known to be conservative with their recommendations, so personally I wouldn't sweat going 10-15% over those miles occasionally. 2019 CRF450L service interval matrix

In terms of long-term reliability, there's no way I can tell you from a one day ride. The best indicators will be how later gen 450X models have held up and to a lesser extent, the 450R. Few would argue that Honda doesn't have a reputation for quality and the warranty on the 2019 CRF450L seems to back that up. It comes with a 1 year factory warranty, but the same can be extended out to 5 years total for an additional cost. You can even buy just an extra year or an extra 3, so flexibility has been built into the program. I do know that the 450L uses a 3-ring piston that will extend top-end life at a fractional performance cost pretty much no riders will notice. This just makes sense for the application.

19 Honda CRF450L_piston.jpg
Illustration: American Honda

Is the LED Headlight Effective?

We didn’t get an opportunity to night ride, so we improvised and pushed a 450L into a field on the edge the hotel, pointing the headlight into the woods.

crf450L_Headlight.png
The cutoff height increases with a rider on the bike. Pics taken with no rider. Photo by El Jefe of CDSR.

I think that the CRF450L headlight would do a good job for a night time cruise on back roads at legal-ish speeds and no question that it would get you off the trails if you got caught out after dark. But if you really want to trail ride at night, get something helmet mounted.

Anything That I Didn't Like About the 2019 CRF450L?

The clutch lever perch has an internal switch that requires the lever to be pulled fully against the grip in order to restart the bike. It wasn't a huge deal for me, but something that I noticed when I flamed out and tried to get the bike lit quickly with the magic button. I know that this was a point of feedback from some of the very fast riders in our group to Honda engineers who eagerly solicited feedback after the ride. 

I also don't like that there is no back-up kickstarter for a dual sport that is designed to get deep into the woods. I did confirm with Honda that the new engine cases do not allow for one to be installed retro.  My KTM 690 shares the same design and in the last 1.5 years of ownership it's been no issue. Honda has a pretty solid reputation for reliability, so I think that this falls under the premise that all things are possible, but not all things are likely. For those that Murphy's Law seems to follow, there are good portable jump starters that are easily carried in small packs and "smart" batteries that protect themselves from over-discharge such as the Antigravity "Re-Start"  Lithium battery.

At least for me, the horn button is too easy to hit when you're looking for the turn signal switch. The button is above and sticks out past the signal switch below it, so I ended up honking at the rider in front of me a few times accidentally. But, by the end of the day, I had adapted. The turn signal switch gets used far more than the horn, so I think there's room for improvement ergonomically.

What Really Stood Out About the CRF450L? 

Probably how smooth, refined, and quiet this bike is, despite it being so performance oriented and capable. The combination of rubber dampened sprockets, chain guide, roller & slider materials, urethane filled swingarm, and foam-backed plastic ignition, clutch, and primary sprocket covers help to make this the most refined, low vibration, and quiet street legal dirt bike that I've ridden. Add in a quiet exhaust note and the 450L is pretty stealthy. After a full day of riding, I had a ton of fun, never felt held back, but I really appreciated the lack of mental & physical wear that loud and more raw bikes have. Loud pipes don't save lives, but they do tick off others recreating in or living by the areas we ride.

crf450_quiet_tech_collage.png
Quiet, refined, & stealthy doesn't have to kill the thrill. Photos: American Honda

Honorable mention: The LED turn signals double as running lights and can be bent 90°, snapping back into operating position without damage. It's a little detail, but a smart and appreciated one. On a bike like this, conventional signals on the rear would last days if not hours.

Would I Personally Buy a 2019 CRF450L? 

Absolutely. Since I left the event, I've been thinking hard about putting a 450L in my garage. I really like this bike a lot. I've not been on a Honda since mid 2000 and they brought their guns to the performance dual sport market with the 2019 CRF450L. Glad to see Honda shaking up the segment and riders are the winners. I wonder who will fire back next? :thinking:

Questions & Comments?

I could probably write more about the 2019 CRF450L, but I think that I covered the important stuff and the things that stood out to me. But, the cool thing about ThumperTalk is the conversation. If I didn't do a good job explaining something or worse, completely glossed over something important to you, DO post your question(s) in the comments section below. If I know, I'll answer. If I don't, I'll reach out to the Honda folks  and see if I can get an answer. The 450L isn't cheap, so if I can help you make the right decision, my mission will have been accomplished.  Also, you can find a several galleries with lots of photos of the 2019 CRF450L in action, as well as close-ups and tech/service info HERE.
 

Bryan Bosch, ThumperTalk.com
180911_drp_honda_crf450l_2521_web.jpg
#crf450L #ridered #dualsport #blessed #grateful

Edited by Bryan Bosch

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13 minutes ago, MotoXImage said:

There’s probably more danger from arm pump on cable than from a failing hydraulic system. Clutch feel is superior with a hydraulic clutch and the feel stays much more consistent as well.  

The point I was making was simple, and you can't argue it. There is less to go wrong with a simple cable mechanism. When it fails it is much easier, and cheaper to fix. Since I started riding in 1972 I have had 1 clutch cable fail while riding. That was on a street bike in LA traffic in 1978.

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No argument on your post. My simple mistake of clicking on the wrong post, not reading that it was not the same person or verbiage that I was referencing. It was the mushy feel post. 

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Based on this review I am looking forward to hearing about the new CRF450X. I also want to hear about the new CRF250RX. I was hoping they had a new CRF250X this year as well but that may be next year, I hope.

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On 9/19/2018 at 6:59 PM, MotoXImage said:

Did you actually ride for a time using the hydraulic clutch or is the “feel” based on just sitting on the bike?

I owned a 2013 KTM 300XC for a year.  The hydro clutch was part of the reason I bought it.  And I do not believe it was much of an improvement over my YZ250 cable clutch at all.  I ran motion pro cables and never had any difference in arm pump. And I honestly thought the KTM clutch felt vague.  The KTM powerband was a lot better at low RPM.  People attribute that low RPM compliance to the hydro clutch, but its not from that IMO.  

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Just trying to learn. 

My hands are medium/small. I’m almost 60, not as strong as 10 years ago. For me they’re a godsend. 

Im wondering if your a lot stronger and bigger and that’s why it didn’t make much of a difference to you? 

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28 minutes ago, MotoXImage said:

Just trying to learn. 

My hands are medium/small. I’m almost 60, not as strong as 10 years ago. For me they’re a godsend. 

Im wondering if your a lot stronger and bigger and that’s why it didn’t make much of a difference to you? 

At that time, I was 20 years old and rode very hard about 10 hours per week.  Not real big or strong.  5'11" and 190Lbs and not much body fat.  I have big hands though.  And I was wrenching full time back then.  Between riding hard and wrenching all day, my hands were strong enough to crush a skull!  Lol.  

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In my opinion Honda is trailing even with this offering.

 

289lbs and 40hp is what I've read. In what world is that an acceptable weight and power output for a DS?

That's 50lbs more than a KTM 350 EXC and 13hp down... With 100cc's less. 

In a world with bikes like the KTM 500 EXC, Husqvarna 501, and Beta 480, 500, 520 that have hydraulic clutches, sub 235lb weights and 50+ HP... Honda's offering is lackluster at best.

If I wanted a street legal Honda DS, I'd STILL buy a 2005+ CRF450x (13 year old design) with 20 less lbs and more power stock than this new L...

 

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I think your weight comparison doesn’t take “wet” into account. The Honda figure is wet, “the KTM is dry.

I’m not sure where you getting 53hp for the KTM? The race version is apx 58. With all smog equipment, ecu, fuel and exhaust restrictions on the Street version, only a 5hp loss isn’t very likely. 

 

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You're missing the point. 

It's overly heavy and under powered compared to other offerings... 

.

.

.

While I'm glad to see Honda back at the table. It's like they've decided to play poker with 1 card less than everyone else on purpose

 

I can't think of a similar offering with more weight or less power.

My portly street legal 2008 CRF450x was 271lbs wet. That's with an aluminum skid plate, disc guard, and Cycra wrap arounds. (Remember the gas tank on those are almost 1 gallon more than this new L) And that's a 13 year old design...

Even the (5 year old designed) fuel injected RMX450z (272lbs wet) add a few with street legal stuff on it is still lighter. 

Add hand guards, skid plates and some armor to this new Honda and you'll have a legitimately 300lb bike.  No thanks.

 

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7 hours ago, Gravesdigger said:

You're missing the point. 

It's overly heavy and under powered compared to other offerings... 

.

.

.

While I'm glad to see Honda back at the table. It's like they've decided to play poker with 1 card less than everyone else on purpose

 

I can't think of a similar offering with more weight or less power.

My portly street legal 2008 CRF450x was 271lbs wet. That's with an aluminum skid plate, disc guard, and Cycra wrap arounds. (Remember the gas tank on those are almost 1 gallon more than this new L) And that's a 13 year old design...

Even the (5 year old designed) fuel injected RMX450z (272lbs wet) add a few with street legal stuff on it is still lighter. 

Add hand guards, skid plates and some armor to this new Honda and you'll have a legitimately 300lb bike.  No thanks.

 

I suppose I’m not a real dual sport rider (as in “The princess and the Pea syndrome) because I don’t think I could tell two bikes apart with ~30 lbs or 5 hp difference.

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I have read some other reviews on this bike as well.  One of them states the Honda  CRF450L  is no where near in the same league as the KTM 500 EXC dual sports,  since there Inception. Have you ever rode a KTM 500 EXC? And if so, how do these 2 bikes compare in your opinion. Thanks

Edited by Orange Crush 500

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Just got the actual gear ratios for the 2019 CRF450L from Honda for those that have asked:

crf450L_gear_ratios.JPG

Waiting on two more questions from them:

1. can't the 450L be bump started on a dead or nearly dead battery.
2. What's the stator output.

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Thank you for a great review! I really hope this bike is a success for Honda and other Japanese brands follow suit.

 

I also hope that Honda then develops a CRF650L with a bit beefier chassis and range - giving us more options than the 690/701, and a true Baja killer. 

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Great review Bryan

I am starting to feel good about this bike

"It will wheelie"

that says a lot

and the pic of the lumpy downhill, the guy in the back looked like he got some traction and the front end was reaching for the sky

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Does it have a cooling fan? If yes, did it come on?

My experience with 4-strokes is that they get hot on really tight trails and require a cooling fan, but your circuit appears to have been fast riding. So we might know how tight the single track was, can you tell us your speed average in that section?

How would it be for two-up riding on logging roads?

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Yes, it has a rad fan. It did come on a few times in slower sections with a lot a clutch. But zero signs of boil. It it does, there is a recovery reservoir between the lower frame rails in front of the engine, but behind the skid plate. There were no push/pull/drag the bike over stuff sections, so no hard enduro. Some sections were 2nd gear or 1st if you got cheesed up. I'm sure the Trail Tech Voyager can keep track of average speeds, but having never used one and focusing on the ride, I didn't bother to pay attention honestly. On the single track, I'd guess mid teens? But, much faster on the double track and forest service roads.

I did ride another rider back up to his bike about 50 yards. My guess he was 200lbs. and the bike sagged a lot. I'd say if sprung right, you could ride two up in a pinch with a smaller, lighter passenger, but I wouldn't buy the bike if that's part of your regular riding. Better bikes for that for sure.

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Hey Bryan; had a question for you about 5 posts  back, but didnt see an answer yet. It was  about comparing a KTM500 EXC against the Honda CRF450L? Thanks

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On 9/25/2018 at 12:09 PM, Orange Crush 500 said:

I have read some other reviews on this bike as well.  One of them states the Honda  CRF450L  is no where near in the same league as the KTM 500 EXC dual sports,  since there Inception. Have you ever rode a KTM 500 EXC? And if so, how do these 2 bikes compare in your opinion. Thanks

I've not ridden the 500 EXC. I do have an opinion based upon what I've read about them, but hardly 1st hand.

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On 9/25/2018 at 12:35 AM, Gravesdigger said:

You're missing the point. 

It's overly heavy and under powered compared to other offerings... 

.

.

.

While I'm glad to see Honda back at the table. It's like they've decided to play poker with 1 card less than everyone else on purpose

 

I can't think of a similar offering with more weight or less power.

My portly street legal 2008 CRF450x was 271lbs wet. That's with an aluminum skid plate, disc guard, and Cycra wrap arounds. (Remember the gas tank on those are almost 1 gallon more than this new L) And that's a 13 year old design...

Even the (5 year old designed) fuel injected RMX450z (272lbs wet) add a few with street legal stuff on it is still lighter. 

Add hand guards, skid plates and some armor to this new Honda and you'll have a legitimately 300lb bike.  No thanks.

 

I agree with that thinking of starting off with lighter faster bike and adding just what you need to street legal it. Thats why I bought the FE350 (not street legal from factory) instead of the one with all the blinkers and stuff. But from what I know, here in my state you can get street plates for KTM and HUsky even if they didnt come with one, but I know a lot of people, a lot, who have tried to plate XR400's 450X's Yammy WR450's, and other very similar Japanese bikes and they cant get a plate for them at all. I know some states you can get it thru though. But if I could get one for a Jap bike I would have bought the Yamaha 450X and went that route. Did you get yours plated easily?

 

 

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About the clutch comparison. Dont compare them when they are brand new. Grab a clutch on a 4 year old YZ250 and one on a 4 year old Hydro then compare. I know the cable can be replaced to keep it easier but a lot of people probably dont realize how much more drag it has after a few years, until they ride their freinds new bike or a hydro clutch. And then how many will replace it just for that reason. 

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      There is a brass fitting that goes into the airboot, if you want you probably could swap it out with the one from the R or RX.

      Line that was swapped out that routes to the carbon canister. 

       
      The Honda PGM-FI tool does not work, pretty much saw that coming but I found a used one off ebay for really cheap and my friend wanted me to tune his bike. I might be able to figure out something else out but haven't had as much time due to studying for a cert for work. 

       
      Hopefully an exhaust is next on the list, maybe swap or modify the airbox but I don't want to do that until I can add more fueling. Im sure this bike is running super lean from the factory to pass emissions standards. I also have some levers that I purchased but need a different brake master to fit so that's on hold for the moment. 
       
    • By J.P.C.
      2014 New Edition KLR650
      Ridden mostly on-road commuting to work.
       
      5900 miles (will increase as I am still riding it)
      Thermo bob 2
      EM Doo hickey & torsion spring
      JNS skid plate
      SW Motech crash bars
      SW Motech center stand
      Moose luggage racks
      Pelican 1550 cases with Caribou case liners
      MadStad windscreen
      LeoVince exhaust
      Pro taper evo handlebars 
      Uni air filter
      Touratech headlight guard 
      HTP master cylinder guard
      New Bridgestone Trail Wing tires
      LED dash lights
      Aprilia mirrors
      Top gun 7.4kg rear shock spring
      Jetted for 8000 ft altitude (140 main)
       
      Extra Parts included:
      Stock Exhaust
      Stock Tires (only approx 200 miles on these before I changed them)
      Stock Windscreen
      Stock Hand guards
      Stock Skid plate
      Stock Mirrors
      16t sprocket
      Stock Rear shock spring
      Carb jets: 138, 142.5, 145
       
      Bike has been taken care of. Only damage is 2 small scratches on tank from leaning against it with belt buckle. Has been stored outside, but covered.
    • By 450L
      I was wondering if anyone thinks the R modle piston would work in the L.
      I know they have the same bore and stroke. Same valves just different cam and piston and the wrist pin is different also. 
      I have had my L for weak now and I'm missing the power from the R models.
      The R has 13:1 and the L only has 12:1
      Also thoughts on the fuel adjustment when doing this. I don't think rasing the compression ratio would affect the fuel mixture. 
    • By PaulKTM
      Low hours (111Hrs) well kept bike. Ready to ride!
      A great trail bike, with some small changes it would be a great super moto or street/trail bike also.

      Valves checked and as always in spec.
      .46 front springs, 7.6 rear (for 190lbs trail rider, this is one step stiffer over stock, OEM springs included)
      Rekluse 3.0 Core clutch
      HD tubes front and rear
      BRP bark busters and shields
      Bullet Proof billet radiator guards
      EE Skid plate
      EE Rear disk guard
      Fuel tank sock
      TM design chain guard
      Golan super mini fuel filter
      Hammerhead billet shifter
      Sicass 40/45W H4 bulb headlight
      New chain/sprockets (~30 hrs on it)
      Shori lithium battery (~ 1 year old)
      KTM hard parts billet 3X clamps, 22 offset
      New rear bearings/seals/spacers (OEM)
      New Heim bearing
      New SKF fork seals
      You can save $700 if you want me to pull out the Rekluse and put the OEM clutch back in and remove the Scott's.
      and the really cool KTM brief case!

      I will work with you on shipping the bike but it would be best to meet face to face.

      3.4 gal oversize tank included also (Not pictured)

      All offers considered!
    • By JWellz
      Anyone have any unbiased opinion if they were buying a new dual sport.   Would you go with the new Honda CRF450L or the Beta 430rrs?   Why
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