How to Bleed Brakes - Video Tutorial


Shane Watts


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      its a 2007 xcf 250. I rebuilt the front caliper after seeing how horrible the rear was. Prior to this the front brake worked perfectly fine. But this bike was used and very neglected.
      I rebuilt the caliper, reassembled everything as it was, filled the reservoir with fluid, and began the bleeding process. I began just pumping the brake, holding it, opening the bleed screw on the caliper then closing it, and repeating this. I probably refilled the reservoir a dozen times or so forcing fluid through the system. Never built pressure though.
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      My sons been complaining the last couple races that his brakes are little on the long side and wants me to upgrade them. I've ridden his bike before and the brakes are under par in comparison to my KX450 or my other sons KTM 65SX. I don't want to spend a bunch of money unless it's really a need so these are the options I've come up with. I'm looking for some feedback from anyone thats been down this road.
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