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Off-Road & Dual Sport Wheel Balancing


SnowMule

Balancing front and rear wheels makes a HUGE difference on the highway! :thumbsup:

Pick-up a pack of stick-on-weights from Harbor Freight or your favorite moto shop. I stick 'em inside the rim (in the dish), tape them down, and put the rim strip over them. And, it doesn't seem to make tire changes any more difficult.

Balance it on the axle by spinning the wheel (vertically) until it stops. Add weight on the top side (typically opposite the rim lock) and repeat until the wheel stops in the same place.

Gravity pulls the heaviest part of the wheel to the bottom. If it's way out of balance, you can feel it on the stand/bike as you spin the wheel. The wheel will visibly speed up and slow down as that heavy spot "goes up" and "goes down".

A perfectly balanced wheel will have no heavy spot - Gravity pulls on all the "pieces of the pie" of the wheel equally.
When you spin it, friction will stop the wheel at a different spot every time. This is your goal.

Spin the wheel, let it stop. Spin the wheel and let it stop again. If it stops in the same place, that's the heavy part of the wheel. Add a weight to the top.
Spin the wheel, let it stop. Spin the wheel and let it stop again. Did it stop at the same place again, or a different spot? If you spin it and let it stop again, does it stop at a different spot, or same spot as before?

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Why not just use Counteract Balancing Beads? They can be used in a tube and are not going to damage your rims like those weights will, especially being taped inside the rim. Also beads will constantly change with the tire as it changes because they are not stationary at all times. Just a suggestion. 

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Maybe just me but dont you/everyone balance tires with the COMPLETE wheel set up? its the tires that throws it off. And really the front is the most important.

No sir, the imbalance is mostly caused by the bead lock.  The rear bead lock is larger and heavier than the front, mine come out to 3.5oz front and 4.5oz rear.  Ive been balancing my wheels with weights under the rim strip like this for years.  Makes a huge difference even on just a trail bike.

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Better than nothing but the tire (unless you run what the pros get) is going to throw it out of balance. Better to balance with the tire on. Sometimes, I've had to relocate the tire because it would throw the balance so far off.

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This is strange very strange?

Wheels should be balanced with tires on, period!

The procedure mentioned in the article is wastes time and money.

There are so good and easy to mount counterweights for balancing the wheel already available it makes no sense to use these? The standard are square weights that are glued to the rim like you have on the car.

The far more correct balancing can be done by the tire workshop they will get your wheels balanced in minutes and it's really not expensive.

Again very strange procedure.

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I've been using No-Mar re-usable wheel weights with my dual sport and they work fine. I bought an assorted set of chrome weights. They each have an allen screw that holds them in place. Easy to balance a wheel with the tire on. I haven't personally lost any yet - or at least I haven't noticed if INomar%20wheel%20Weight_2_zps7nfrrs1o.jpg have. 

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I use round lead fishing weights to balance my wheels on the spokes. Simply cut them up the side, pry them open with a screw driver, put around the spoke, crimp down, and tape into place with self-fusing tape. They don't go anywhere. 

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