Jump to content

Articles

Know a little something about maintenance, fixing, tuning, or modifying MX, offroad, & dual sport motorcycles, ATV or UTV? Or, maybe you have mad skills riding or racing them? Whatever the case, if you have valuable knowledge & experiences that relates to motorcycles, ATVs, or UTVs, please help your fellow riders by sharing your best tips, tricks, and how to articles.

    Chas_M
    About two years ago, I adapted a brake fluid specific Magura clutch master cylinder for left handed rear braking (LHRB) by connecting the new master cylinder directly to the rear brake caliper on my RevLoc equipped '04 KTM 525 EXC. This setup has performed superbly since then and provides excellent progressive two finger rear braking. The reason that I used the special brake fluid compatible master cylinder is that Magura claimed that the OEM mineral oil clutch master cylinder was not compatible with brake fluid and that the rubber seals, etc will deteriorate.
    In the interim, I have run across at least three long-term cases where the OEM mineral oil master cylinder has been successfully incorporated into the LHRB system without any problems whatsoever with the seals. Therefore I decided to give the OEM mineral oil master cylinder a test in my LHRB setup just for kicks.
    After thoroughly cleaning and flushing out the mineral oil from the OEM Magura master cylinder, the whole project took less than 30 minutes to complete including reverse bleeding with 5.1 Motul brake fluid using a syringe. The easiest and least expensive way to connect the stock master cylinder to the rear brake caliper is to connect the stock (flushed and cleaned) clutch line to the stock rear brake line via a "double banjo" fitting. These "double banjo" fittings are used on most street bikes to split the single front brake line to the dual front brake calipers and are available cheap from any motorcycle salvage yard.
    Just run the original clutch line in roughly the stock location along the left side of the engine. The connection to the rear brake line will be near the oil filters (in KTM's). Note that the double banjo fitting is not a single hollow bolt joining the two banjos piggyback, but rather it is a unit about 1 1/2 inches long to which the two banjos are independently attached. Also, the original clutch slave must be blocked off. It isn't too difficult to make your own block off plate, however RevLoc and I believe also Rekluse sell these block off plates.
    Results: The same superb braking.....perhaps even a little better since the project involved replacing a 10.5mm master cylinder with a 9.0mm unit, which provides increased "leverage" making two fingered braking now even easier. IMO, the LHRB is an essential complement to the auto clutch especially so for technical trail riding, steep downhills and tight switchbacks.
    Note that this procedure is suitable for all auto clutch equipped bikes that come with a stock hydraulic clutch master cylinder.
    TwistiT

    By TwistiT, in Articles,

    - When you take your rear axle out, put it in the tip of your exhaust, this way it wont get dirt all over it.
    - when your trying to get your wheel back on and the disc wont fit into the caliper put a flat blade screw driver between the pads and pry them further apart.
    - after you've changed your brake fluid, how ever way you wish, hold the lever or pedal on whilst cracking open the bleeder, once the lever (or pedal) goes limp close the bleeder. Do this 4 or 5 times for a firmer feel in braking.
    - If you find your pads squeaking, pull them off, put them in your bench clamp and give them a going over with a rotary or normal wire brush, this will also improve brake power.
    - Next time you have your plug out, use a hacksaw to cut the electrode off so theres .6mm (whatever) between it and the inner electrode, side ways that is. This will allow the spark to reach the fuel/O2 quicker and more efficiently.
    - Use a heat gun or hair dryer to get the white crease marks out of plastics.
    got more, but i cant remember em'.
    SnootleMX

    By SnootleMX, in Articles,

    Ok, wheels. Every bike has em, and i bet most bikes have a slight buckle in them too. it's the easiest thing to overcome, just a bit boring but hey.
    first off, mount a pen on your forks pointing at your rim, and spin the wheel a few times. This will leave a pen mark on the parts of the wheel that are buckled so you can stop spinning it all day and trying to catch the wheel at the buckle.
    Next, take your spoke wrench (a spanner really won't do much - trust me). All you need to do is loosen the side where the buckle is, and tighten the oposite side in effect "pulling" the wheel back into place. this will in effect put tension back on the other side so your spokes aren't loose. EASY!!
    You only need turn the spoke nipples at max 1 turn at a time and alternate between about 4 - 6 spokes (2-3 on each side). After some patience, and a few cups of tea, you'll have a nice straight wheel ready to go out and bend again. Lovely 👍
    Dwight_Rudder
    General Ergonomics:
    -I generally like a medium soft seat that is wide enough to sit on. Enduro Engineering has a nice wider replacement seat for the 04-05 KTMs.
    -I also tend to like a slightly taller handlebar setup. I like to use minibike bars on my race bikes. If using a 7/8's handlebar , I like the Renthal YZ80 bend. Slightly straight bend and about 7 mm taller than CR-HI. You also don't have to trim this bar for the woods. It is just under 29" wide. If using the Fat bar setup that is popular now I find the Moose Flex Series Mini bend bar is very nice. Similar to the YZ80 bend but is 29 1/2" wide. Again no cutting down to size.
    -I prefer the Moose aluminum hand guards. Sometimes I add the plastic deflectors to them. I set them up straight forward when you are sitting on the bike.
    I adjust the levers a couple degrees down from straight forward. Adjust the levers to move if you hit them hard with the palm of your hand. I usually trim the balls off and make the levers a 3 finger on the clutch and a 2-3 finger on the brake.
    -I adjust my shifter slightly above level with the foot peg. That way you never have to point your toe down to shift. Ride with your toes pointed down and you chance breaking your toes or foot. You may have to shift by raising your leg when sitting way forward.
    -Adjust your rear break lever to have about 3/4 to 1" of play.
    -Adjust to level with foot peg. I usually add a stiffer return spring to the lever to help prevent me from dragging the break in tight woods. The first time you use it it feels funny but you quickly adapt.
    -Use a High temp brake fluid like Maxima or Motul Racing. I also prefer using Moose Brake pads. These are made by DP Brakes for Moose. The difference is that the Moose pads have double the ceramics on the back to prevent heat transfer and helps keep the brake fluid from boiling. They work well and last long also.
    Suspension
    -I also set my suspension up very light but controlled. I don't want the suspension to "Baby Buggy".
    -I like Pirelli tires with Bridgestone HD tubes. I use the MT83/Scorpion Pro front tire in the wet and the MT16 when dry. I always run the MT16 rears and adjust air pressure for the situation.
    -If wet I will run 11 PSI ft and 10 PSI rear. If dry I run 12 Psi ft and rear. I like the MT16 rear tire for the control it gives me in the woods. It allows me to slide my rear tire with total control. I can brake slide a tight turn and roost out . I find I couldn't do this using a tire like the Michelin S12. The S12 just got too much traction ( if there is such a thing ). The Pirelli MT16s are Pirelli's cheapest tires too.
    -I usually gear my bikes down a bit. Like on my KTM 525EXC, I went from a 48T rear to a 52-53T. On my Honda XR400 I went from a 45T to a 48T. On my Honda XR250s ( with big bore kits), I had to go to a 46T from a 48T. Which is gearing taller as it was geared too low from the factory. Like the TTR125 Yamaha is geared way too low. I had to go up 2 teeth on the Countershaft sprocket on my wife's bike.
    Cher'o
    Dwight
    motoinmoab
    Here’s how to tune your DR-Z400E & S suspension for dirt riding. This is a basic explanation of your bike: where the adjusters are and how they affect the ride. How hard and fast you ride, and how rough the terrain is, will determine where you set your adjusters. I’ve also noted where pre-02 S models lack some of these adjusters.
    First, measure everything as it is adjusted now. Write it down for future reference. It’s possible that you’ll make it worse before it gets better, so it helps to know your starting points. Measure your Race Sag (next paragraph) and where your dampening clickers are currently set (the one after that).
    Have you set your Race Sag? That's your preload adjustment for the shock spring, and it's pretty important. You want about 90 mm of sag with you in full gear on the bike, you'll need a friend to help measure. Changing your Race Sag will affect handling in many ways: steering, fore / aft balance, ride stiffness. Making a change of 10 mm here is huge. Good links with pictures for this adjustment procedure are at the bottom of the page. The TT store also has a Basic Suspension Setup DVD that is pretty good.
    Now, what about those 5 clicker adjustments? Start by turning your clickers all the way in (clockwise), to get your starting reference point, you’ll then back them out to get the ride you want. Count the clicks as you are turning, write this number down for future reference. In is hard, stiff, harsh / out is softer, smoother, bouncier. Make your adjustments 3 or 4 clicks at a time at first, you want to make a significant enough change that you will definitely recognize what you've just done, for better or worse. Then go 1 at a time to fine tune it. You probably wish it would feel soft on small hits, but you don't want it to bottom out too often, or wallow around in sand whoops. I’ve included some suggested starting points, they are by no means where YOU should end up.
    Compression adjustment for the forks is on the bottom of the legs, start with them about 12 clicks out. If your forks dive, turn them in stiffer. If too harsh, back them out. Rocks and roots will be more comfortable with them softer, but sand performance or high speeds will suffer if too soft. It's hard to get one setting that is perfect for all conditions.
    Rebound for the forks is on top, dead center of the cap, start about 12 clicks out also. This controls the return stroke: too soft and the bike will bounce back or hop, too hard and the bike will feel harsh and steer funny in a series of bumps. Compression and Rebound adjustments often affect the ride in a similar fashion, making it pretty confusing sometimes to know which one needs further tuning. More on this later. Pre-02 S models have a spring preload adjuster, not rebound adjustment. The offset screw is your air bleed screw, to release built up air pressure.
    Compression for the shock is a 2 part adjustment: a small screw, in the middle of a 14 mm nut, on top of the shock reservoir. These are referred to as the low speed (screw) and high speed (nut) compression adjusters. These terms refer to the shock’s rate of compression, not the speed you are going. The relationship between the high and low speed compression circuits is complicated, changing one affects the other. Set the screw about 10 clicks out, and the nut 2 full turns out. Start tuning the ride by adjusting the screw first: in if the rear is too soft on medium hits, out if the bike feels harsh and like you aren't getting full travel. (Your Race Sag adjustment, or an incorrect rear spring rate, can cause these very same symptoms, that’s why it’s so important to check them first) High speed compression is often referred to as the one you adjust to control bottoming, but it’s not that simple. Here’s the best technical explanation I’ve found: Hi / Low Speed Compression Where you ride and how you ride will determine YOUR settings, for instance many guys run the high speed nut out all the way. And you do want your suspension to occasionally bottom out on your biggest hits, but you don't want to be crushing it. Pre-02 S models only have the low speed adjuster, some frustrated tuners might call you the lucky ones.
    Rebound for the shock is a screw at the bottom of the shock body, just below the swing arm. The stock valving here is a little weak for the rock ledges in the desert southwest, and I run mine at 4 clicks out. Too little rebound will cause the rear to hop up and kick you in the butt after a sharp edge hit. Too much will cause the rear to pack up, hopping side to side in the whoops (just like too much compression damping). Turn it out as much as you can, but the kicking in the butt is your tell tale sign of not enough rebound. Pre-02 S Models don’t have this adjuster.
    It really helps to dedicate some time to this project. Go out with a buddy who has the same goal in mind, and go back and forth over the same terrain again and again. That way you'll really know what you just fixed, or messed up. And only change one adjustment at a time. If you do both compression and rebound at the same time, you won't really know which one just made it better or worse.
    Setting your Race Sag
    Checking your Free Sag and determining spring rate: Free Sag
    Suspension Setup DVD: /shop/Fineline-Basic-Suspension-Setup-Video-SPN-FINELINE-SUSPENSIONVID-p2006766377.html
    georgestr
    Originally Posted By: PA_Kevin in the TTR forum.
    Jetting 101:
    Question:
    I thought my Yamaha TTR 125 would idle without the choke. But with when the choke was off it would not idle. But the opposite happened with the choke.
    Is there any particular reason for this?
    Answer:
    Your carb meters the fuel to your engine. The carb has three different sub systems:
    Pilot Jetting - for up to 1/4 throttle position
    Needle Jetting - 1/4 > 3/4 throttle position
    Main Jetting - 3/4 > full throttle
    These jets allow a fixed amount of fuel, the needle allowing an "operating band" of fuel metering.
    To alter the amount of fuel, you can either increase or decrease the orifice (the hole in the jet). This applies to your pilot and main jet.
    The needle jet is actually a needle. The fuel first passes through the main jet, then the needle limits the fuel flow (kinda like putting your pinky finger into a garden hose. Water still comes out, just not as much).
    The reason your bike won't idle:
    Fuel Screw
    The Fuel Screw is mis-labeled in the Yamaha manual. It is labeled as an "Air Screw". This is 100% backwards. Air screws are on two stroke carbs. The last I checked, this carb has been on this 4 stroke engine.
    The fuel screw allows more fuel through the pilot circuit. This very definitely affects low speed operation. To allow more fuel flow or richen up the bottom end, the fuel screw is turned counter-clockwise (or turned OUT). This IS richening up the bottom end.
    To lean it out, the fuel screw must be turned clockwise (or turned in). The problem with this low speed/idle jetting is it is too lean. The only time I think you would turn it in is if you decide to ride your TTR into the Rockie Mountains, where bikes are starving for air, which ain't there!
    Pilot Jet
    First, your pilot jet is absolutely too small. You need to go up in size to a 17.5. The fuel screw on your carb allows a VARIABLE amount of fuel to pass through the pilot jet. This fuel screw WILL ABSOLUTELY affect your idle. The fuel screw has a spring behind it that allows you to turn it without it falling out of your carb. Turning it in REDUCES the amount of fuel (leaning the fuel/air mixture) and conversely turning it out INCREASES the amount of fuel (richening the fuel/air mixture). The bike IS starving for fuel at idle because the pilot jet is too small. Regardless of the fuel screw position, your bike NEEDS MORE FUEL. If you end up turning your fuel screw out 3 turns or more, your pilot jet IS TOO SMALL.
    Needle Jet
    The needle jet can be changed as well, or raised or lowered. So far, I have not seen any recommendations to swap out needles. Needles vary in diameter, AND taper in size, i.e. the tip of the needle is skinnier than the diameter half way up the needle. So as the needle is being pulled up, the needle gets skinnier. This allows MORE fuel as the needle is raised up via the throttle cable.
    There is a clip on the needle that allows you to raise or lower the needle, effectively changing the amount of fuel flowing in this 1/4 > 3/4 throttle position. So, if you move the clip down, this effectively raises the needle. Since the needle is now higher in the carb, and we know the needle is skinnier at the bottom, MORE fuel will pass through in the midrange than before you moved the clip.
    As for swapping out the needle, the skinnier the needle, the more fuel allowed into your engine.
    Main Jet
    At 3/4 throttle and higher, the ONLY thing metering fuel is the main jet. If your bike has problems at wide open throttle, the main jet is your culprit (unless it's your ignition...???). A larger main allows more fuel.
    When you modify your bike, i.e. cut your airbox lid, install a high air flow airfilter, you are changing the amount of air into the engine.
    When you install an aftermarket exhaust pipe, more air (exhaust) is coming out of your engine.
    In BOTH of these conditions, you MUST increase the fuel going to your engine to offset the air going into (or out of) your engine.
    Moving more air means you have to move more fuel.
    Elevation & Weather Changes
    When there is a change in the weather or riding elevation, the amount of Oxygen or moisture will be the culprit. At higher elevations, there is less O2 available. You will need to jet lean to decrease the amount of fuel to compensate for the lower O2.
    If it is humid, there is MORE water in the air, you MAY have to jet lean.
    In the winter, bikes run lean. Because of the lower temps and humidity, there is more O2 due to density changes. Your bike will run lean, and you will benefit w/ RICHER jetting.
    I hope this helps you understand carbs better.
    If you have ANY recomendations/comments/questions to IMPROVE or DISPUTE this post in any way, please PM me. I am wide open to critique!!
    Kevin
    Scovndrel
    This article covers checking your carb needle to find out which one you have, and doing some basic mods to your KLX300 for quick and cheap performance gains.
    Before I say anything else, I have to tell you that according to the Owner's manual for the 2006 KLX300, it is a federal offense to remove or modify any part of the intake system, carburetion system, or exhaust system. It is also a federal offense to operate any vehicle that has been modified in this manner.
    Not only that, but making these modifications will void your warranty. Your dealer may charge you for repairs related to these systems if you modify them.
    Having said all of that, everyone does it, and the dealers even tell people to do it. I've never heard of anyone getting busted anywhere but California for moding their bike.
    Here's the deal:
    In models previous to 2006, Kawasaki shipped the bike to 49 of the states with one type of needle in it. The California models got bikes with a different needle in them (and a bunch of other smog equipment). I don't know what the CA guys do to make their bikes run better.
    The rest of the world, however, made some very easy mods to greatly improve the bike's performance:
    a. Remove the airbox lid.
    b. Replace the air filter
    c. Remove the restrictor plate from the muffler.
    d. Replace the crankcase breather hose.
    Those changes, by themselves, made a huge difference.
    However, starting with 2006, Kawasaki is shipping all U.S. bikes with the needle that they used to send only in the California bikes. Now, the Canada bikes get the good needle and everyone else gets the "bad" needle. With the bad needle in there, removing the airbox lid causes the bike to run like crap. So, now you need to replace that needle AND do all of the things mentioned above.
    Here it is in more detail:
    1. Identify your needle.
    The first thing you need to do is find out what needle you have in there. To get to it, first remove the seat and gas tank (make sure you shut the gas off first). From there, you'll be able to get into the top of the carb, where the needle is. Here's an exploded diagram of the carburetor:

    Make sure that when you take it apart, you carefully keep track of each component and put it back the way you found it.
    The first thing to do is remove the diaphragm cover. That's #14041 in the picture. When it comes off, the spring under it will try to escape. Don't let it.
    Get yourself a tupperware container and put the cover, screws, and spring in it.
    Once you have the cover and spring out, stick your finger down the hole and gently remove the slide. Make sure the rubber diaphragm doesn't get stuck on anything and tear.
    Once you have the slide out, put your hand over the hole and turn it upside down. The "seat-spring valve" (white plastic thing with legs, #16007) will come out, along with the needle possibly some other tiny bits like a collar (#92143) and spring clip (#92037) - but the clip, if it exists, should be firmly attached to the needle.
    Compare your needle to these two pictures:

    If it looks like Needle2.jpg, it's the "bad" needle.
    If it looks like Needle3.jpg, it's the "good" needle.
    The needles also have little letters and numbers stamped into them near the fat end. If it says "N5AF", it's the "bad" needle. If it says "N1TC" it's the "good" needle.
    If it is the good needle, put your bike back together and skip to step #2. Make sure you get that white plastic thing with leg in right. Don't cover the hole in the bottom; make sure it seats all of the way. Your bike will tell you if you get it wrong.
    If it is the bad needle, call your dealer and order these parts:
    16009-1912 - Needle-Jet,N1TC
    92037-1401 - Clamp, Jet Needle
    92143-1667 - Collar
    The new needle will cost you about $20. Not sure about the clamp and collar, but they'll be cheap.
    2. Remove the airbox lid.
    This step is frighteningly easy. Just pull off the seat, unscrew the four bolts holding the lid on, pull it off (and store it safely somewhere), and put the screws back in. I recommend this so that you don't lose the screws, and so that your screw holes don't get muddy, corroded, or whatever.
    The airbox lid looks like this:

    See how small the intake holes are in that lid? See how much more air it can get if you remove it?
    Oh, and by the way, see how much more dust, grit, sand, and water can get into the airbox without the lid? Clean and lube your air filter VERY often after you've taken that lid off. Get some air filter oil and remover that is easy to clean off and re-apply. I recommend "No-Toil" filter oil and cleaner. No-Toil also sells filters, but the popular opinion says to buy a "UNI" filter instead. It has a rough outer filter and fine inner filter. It lets more air in while still filtering out the bad stuff. They cost about $20. The No-Toil costs about $7.95 each for the oil and cleaner.
    3. Remove the restrictor plate.
    This is also very easy. The plate at the back of the muffler has two screws holding it on. Remove them, remove the plate, store the plate with the airbox lid, and put the screws back in.
    The restrictor plate looks like this:

    The Kawasaki manual calls this piece the spark arrester. I think they do that to try and scare you. The parts diagram on the Kawasaki website calls it the "Baffle-pipe, muffler". I asked the dealer if the spark arrester still stopped sparks with the cover off and he said it did (shrug).
    This mod will make the bike a lot louder, so your neighbors might not like it if you run the bike at home a lot after making this mod. It also leaves a gaping hole in the back of the can, so be careful when hosing down your bike. Don't get any water in there if you can avoid it.
    4. Replace the crankcase filter.
    This mod isn't as popular, but is supposed to help significantly as well. The deal is that the stock crankcase breather hose has a brass couple in it that has a really small hole in it that restricts airflow. A bigger hose without a coupler is supposed to help. You run the hose up into the airbox and stick the little filter on the end.
    You can get all of the crankcase breather stuff from your local auto parts store.
    ARin
    I wanted to be able to remove my fender packs when i don't need them...but i also like the security of the bolt-on design, rather than the strap on type of packs.
    Here is my solution.

    Chuck the pins in the worlds smallest vise and use a cutting wheel, or hacksaw to cut them just above the first hitch pin hole. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE WEAR SAFETY GLASSES!!! Cutting wheels have a tendency to fly apart whenever they want to...and riding is tough with one eye.

    Then chamfer and smooth the rough ends with the worlds smallest bench grinder. *I have a pretty small garage, so you will notice many of my tools are also of Lilliputian dimensions

    Now, you have used the bolt holes in your fender pack as a template to drill the appropriate holes in your fender. Here we see the trimmed Clevis pins with washers inserted into the underside of the fender holes, and epoxied in place.

    Here we see the finished product from the top of the fender. This is the way it will look when you don't want to lug around your packs.

    Now, you can use the hitch pins to secure your fender bag in a snap...and still take it off easily!!


    Here is my headlight shroud getting the same treatment.

    And the finished product, the way it looks when you don't want to take your packs.

    And here it is with my moose tool pack attached


    All done!!!!

    ARin
    This is a beginners guide to general take down of the Kiehin FLAT FCR carburetor.
    The bike shown is a 2004 wr450f, but the general design of the carburetor in this article is common for many different makes, models and displacements of bikes.
    This article is NOT an exhaustive tutorial, but should walk you through the steps necessary to open up the carb, and find the most commonly replaced jets.
    To begin, we turn the tank petcock off, disconnect the fuel line, and remove the tank from the bike.

    Use a suitable cover for the gas inlet, and make sure there is no loose dirt/dust around/on the carb that could fall in. I use a spray bottle of water, and compressed air to dry it. Even better is to hose off and dry the bike

    Generously loosen the rear air boot with a phillips screwdriver, and the front boot clamp that attaches to the motor with the appropriate allen wrench(no need to loosen both front clamps)..

    Pull the carb rearward, disengaging the front boot, then to the left side of the bike and forward, disengaging the rear boot. Your carb should now sit comfortably to the left side of the bike (this may vary from bike to bike) We are attempting to get the carb in a spot in which both the float bowl and the top plate are accessible.

    and from the bottom, we can see the entire float bowl

    Remove the fuel screw (if you don't have an adjustable fuel screw such as MSR/ZipTy etc, stop now, and go to your shop and get one). Before removing the fuel screw, i like to turn it IN all the way, bottoming it out, so i know how many turns it had been at. Remember to keep the spring/washer/o-ring in the right order, and don't lose them. if they don't come out with the fuel screw, go fishing for them with a dental pick, or a piece of bailing wire..

    Now drain the float bowl into a suitable container, by loosening the drain stopper.

    Now remove the screws at the four corners of the float bowl

    A magnetic pair of gloves or a magnetic dish helps keep track of screws, i highly recommend them.

    With the float bowl removed, we can see inside. Here pointed out is the leak jet...if we are changing the leak jet, remove it with an appropriate size flat blade screw driver, and replace. remember, smaller # leak jet, means larger volume and duration of AP squirt!

    Here, looking straight UP into the carb, we can see the main jet (middle) and the pilot jet (left of picture). The main comes out with an appropriate sized socket, and the pilot slides right out after being loosened with a flat bladed driver.

    After we are done with the pilot, main and leak...we can replace the float bowl.

    Now we rotate the carb so the top plate is visible. And remove the two allen head screws that hold the top plate.

    With the top plate off, we can see the top of the slide, the red tip of the needle, and the needle retaining nut. We remove the nut.

    You can now reach the needle with needle nose pliers (you may need to raise slide by twisting the throttle).

    Now you can change your needle clip position. down for richer, up for leaner. If you are riding a 2005+ Yamaha, your needle is non adjustable. it is worth it to get an OEM adjustable needle, or better yet, a JD needle kit.
    After you are done with the needle clip, drop it back into the slide, and replace the retaining nut. Replace the top cap, refit the carb boots, replace the tank and gas line, and you are done. 👍
    Way Fast Whitey
    *this is for the TT'ers without a bearing press*
    if your rear/front wheel have play in them chances are your bearings in the hub are worn. i've used this method with great results.
    1. remove the wheel from swingarm(for rear wheel)
    2. get the old bearings out, a punch should work, just work around the bearing til it comes free.
    3. go to your local hardware store, and buy a bolt long enough to go through the hub, 2 washers for the size of the bolt/nut, and 2 washers about the size of the new bearings(must be smaller then bearing, but the colser the size the better)
    4.with the new bearings ready for installation, and the inside of the hub cleaned, you can start your new bearings inside the hub.
    5.with the new bearings started in the right direction,put 1 small washer on the bolt, then follow with 1 large washer, fit this through the hub.
    6. once the bolt is through the hub, put the other big washer on the bolt, then the small washer, then the nut, finger tighten.
    7. get your apporiately sized deep socket on the nut and tighten, checking regularly to be sure the bearings are going in right.
    8. once the bearings are seated, you can release the bolt and remove, reinstall on swingarm and do the same to the front.
    good luck
×
×
  • Create New...