Jump to content

Product Spotlight: Alpinestars Tech 7 Boots


Chris Cooksey

Product Spotlight: Alpinestars Tech 7 Boots

These days expensive protective equipment saturate the market, but Alpinestars has a motocross boot that offers high dollar protection with high end quality at the average man’s price.  I have worn the Sidi Crossfire 2, Garne SG-10, SG-12, and Alpinestars Tech 10 boots.  While these top-line boots all share impressive features my favorite is the Alpinestars Tech 7, with the low retail price of $349.  Once Western Power Sports became a distributor for Alpinestars I immediately tested the Tech 10 against the Tech 7 boots.  

My initial thought was I would prefer the highest priced boot, the Tech 10.  While this boot is amazing, I felt like I could literally jump off the roof and have no ankle injuries (not recommended), I struggled with the lack of flexibility.  I am 6’4” and have suffered many foot and ankle injuries throughout the years, the most recent was a ruptured Achilles’ tendon.  I tend to look for boots that offer support and protection, yet allow me the freedom to ride comfortably and the Tech 7 meets this criteria.  If I was riding AMA Supercross I would opt for the Tech 10, but for me and my Vet B riding level the Tech 7 is heaven on my feet! 

Look for both the Tech 7 and Tech 10 boots available in the TT store.   https://thumpertalk.com/shop/cart.php?m=search_results&c=&catID=4443&v=&id=&venID=&attrList=&manuf=1602&priceFilter=&sortBy=PriceHiLo&search=Tech+7&sort=5&asc=desc&page=2

KEY FEATURES

• New dual compound sole is seamlessly integrated into the base structure for superior durability and features high performing rubber grip patterning and enhanced feel. The sole and footpeg insert are replaceable.

• The anatomically profiled shin plate features a dual closure system with an internal microfiber flap attached with Velcro® for a precise fit closure while the rugged and durable shin plate attached securely with a precision adjustable buckle.

• Wide entry aperture for convenience and allows broad ranging calf fit adjustment and support.

• Innovative buckle closure system includes high-impact aluminium bridge closures, with memory settings and a quick release/locking system with self-aligning design for easy, precise closure and improved riding performance. All buckles are replaceable.

• Redesigned instep and Achilles accordion flex zones construction for superior comfort, control and support.

• Extended microfiber gaiter helps prevent excessive water and dirt entry.

• Internal lining includes anti-slip microfiber suede on the heel to help keep foot in position.

IMG_2315.JPG

IMG_2320.JPG

IMG_2321.JPG

IMG_2322.JPG

  • Like 3

User Feedback

Recommended Comments

I much prefer the Tech 7 over the 10. Inner booty is a no go for me.

I have tried every high end boot on the market and the Fox Instinct is my go to. I have a new set of SG12's sitting on the shelf still with tags. 

Boots are such a personal thing.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ive owned a few prs of tech 7s and tech 3s. Always end up back to them because the price was what I could afford at the time. While they work well when new and broken in , they dont last long. 

issues...

1- the design has no ankle "pivot" so all "support" is a function of the material properties wich are breaking down from the moment you start using them. In a short time they go from quite good to same support as a cheap boot.

2- evey pair Ive had has colapsed arch supports and the sole on the kick start side is toast. Really no reasion for an arch to cave like this when a small amount of steel or composit in this area would stop such a problem.

3- the lowest buckle will hit on shift lever if you are a very farward rider. this rather larger "bump" around lowest buckle can easily down shift the bike or slip it into mid shift.

4- The buckles tend to get hard to use over time. Plastic used in the buckle reciever is a bit soft and can be easily deformed. As well they constantly need a bit of silicone lube or the friction properties will resist the buckle from snapping into place.

She looks good but The design needs some refinment. Boots may be a "personal thing" BUT I have found this personality to grow old quick 😉

Edited by lowmass
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a set of Tech 7's that I've owned since '09.  They fit well and they've held up amazingly well.  Stiff at first, and even now they aren't easy to walk in, but here's the thing: I haven't even slightly injured either foot or ankle since I bought them, in spite of the countless times I've bounced my toe off a rock or had the bike fall on my foot.  Not once.  And isn't that why you wear boots?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been wearing high end "pivoting ankle" style boots for many years. Last year I had to find a good, non pivot style boot, so I could get away from wear ankle braces under my boots. The pivot style boots I'd grown to love allowed too much movement for my old, weak ankles, so I had to start wearing braces under them to limit some of the mobility. But, this was becoming an uncomfortable and even sometimes painful way to go. I didn't want to give up the fit and fill of the higher end boots, but most of those are pivot style boots now. The Tech 10 looked like he way to go, but they had booties that I didn't want to mess with and a very large price tag. And being that I've never liked Alpinestars boots, so I was very skeptical of trying them, but there was little else in the way of a non-pivoting / non-bootie boot to choose from. I pulled the trigger on a pair of Tech 7's and hoped for the best.

I'll have to say when I put them on the first time I was very impressed. They felt like no other Alpinestars I'd ever tried on before and as comfortable as any >$500.00 boots I've owned. My ankles felt very secure in the boots right off and I could still walk in them. But, would I be able to ride in them? Would all that security going to come at the cost of feel and control?

On the first ride day with them I was sold. Shifting and braking was still easy with good feel, yet my ankles weren't hurting. I could even get up on the balls of my feet more without ankle strain. I had just found the perfect boot for me and the coolest part was they WEREN'T the most expensive boots on the market! They are actually a reasonable priced boots with true high end fit and feel. And I can almost have two pair of these for the price of their higher end siblings.

I've been wearing these boots for over a year now and I'd have to say I still feel pretty much the same as I did about them when they were new. My only gripe about these, and any Alpinestars boots for that matter, are the buckle system. Although better than in the past, I'm still not a fan of their buckle systems. These are passible, but I think there are much better buckle systems out there.

Yet, even with that, I'll have to say my next pair of boots look to be Alpinestars Tech 7's, because I'm sure I can't find a better boot for the price.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 2/24/2017 at 4:17 AM, lowmass said:

Ive owned a few prs of tech 7s and tech 3s. Always end up back to them because the price was what I could afford at the time. While they work well when new and broken in , they dont last long. 

issues...

1- the design has no ankle "pivot" so all "support" is a function of the material properties wich are breaking down from the moment you start using them. In a short time they go from quite good to same support as a cheap boot.

2- evey pair Ive had has colapsed arch supports and the sole on the kick start side is toast. Really no reasion for an arch to cave like this when a small amount of steel or composit in this area would stop such a problem.

3- the lowest buckle will hit on shift lever if you are a very farward rider. this rather larger "bump" around lowest buckle can easily down shift the bike or slip it into mid shift.

4- The buckles tend to get hard to use over time. Plastic used in the buckle reciever is a bit soft and can be easily deformed. As well they constantly need a bit of silicone lube or the friction properties will resist the buckle from snapping into place.

She looks good but The design needs some refinment. Boots may be a "personal thing" BUT I have found this personality to grow old quick 😉

I have to answer some of your points as they are not accurate.

1.  The boot has a pivot, see attached pic along with Achilles' tendon lock out stop.

2.  The boot has a shell that cannot collapse, if you had this issue it might have been on a previous version.  Do you have a picture?

3.  If the buckle is hitting your shifter, you need a longer shifter or have your feet in the wrong position (ask Gary Semics, you might be doing something wrong).

4.  The buckles are now high impact aluminum and by far the easiest most consistent buckle system available.  

Thanks!

IMG_2371.PNG

IMG_2372.PNG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I've been wearing high end "pivoting ankle" style boots for many years. Last year I had to find a good, non pivot style boot, so I could get away from wear ankle braces under my boots. The pivot style boots I'd grown to love allowed too much movement for my old, weak ankles, so I had to start wearing braces under them to limit some of the mobility. But, this was becoming an uncomfortable and even sometimes painful way to go. I didn't want to give up the fit and fill of the higher end boots, but most of those are pivot style boots now. The Tech 10 looked like he way to go, but they had booties that I didn't want to mess with and a very large price tag. And being that I've never liked Alpinestars boots, so I was very skeptical of trying them, but there was little else in the way of a non-pivoting / non-bootie boot to choose from. I pulled the trigger on a pair of Tech 7's and hoped for the best.

I'll have to say when I put them on the first time I was very impressed. They felt like no other Alpinestars I'd ever tried on before and as comfortable as any >$500.00 boots I've owned. My ankles felt very secure in the boots right off and I could still walk in them. But, would I be able to ride in them? Would all that security going to come at the cost of feel and control?

On the first ride day with them I was sold. Shifting and braking was still easy with good feel, yet my ankles weren't hurting. I could even get up on the balls of my feet more without ankle strain. I had just found the perfect boot for me and the coolest part was they WEREN'T the most expensive boots on the market! They are actually a reasonable priced boots with true high end fit and feel. And I can almost have two pair of these for the price of their higher end siblings.

I've been wearing these boots for over a year now and I'd have to say I still feel pretty much the same as I did about them when they were new. My only gripe about these, and any Alpinestars boots for that matter, are the buckle system. Although better than in the past, I'm still not a fan of their buckle systems. These are passible, but I think there are much better buckle systems out there.

Yet, even with that, I'll have to say my next pair of boots look to be Alpinestars Tech 7's, because I'm sure I can't find a better boot for the price.

Dang, should just use this as my spotlight...  Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, very much. I ordered in a pair some years back, tried them on and they went right back in the box. Exchanged them for a pair of SIDI Crossfire TA's.

Part of the reason I commented that I never cared for Alpinestar boots.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 2/27/2017 at 3:31 PM, Chris Cooksey said:

I have to answer some of your points as they are not accurate.

1.  The boot has a pivot, see attached pic along with Achilles' tendon lock out stop.

2.  The boot has a shell that cannot collapse, if you had this issue it might have been on a previous version.  Do you have a picture?

3.  If the buckle is hitting your shifter, you need a longer shifter or have your feet in the wrong position (ask Gary Semics, you might be doing something wrong).

4.  The buckles are now high impact aluminum and by far the easiest most consistent buckle system available.  

Thanks!

IMG_2371.PNG

IMG_2372.PNG

Chris is correct, ALL my tech 7s were the previous versions.

If they have overcome the issues then amen, its been a long time commin 😉

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm finally ready to replace the Tech 10's I've had since 2001. I've had some of the same issues with the buckles mentioned above, but didn't feel it necessary to replace them until I'd had the boots 12-13 years or so. I'd say I got my money's worth out of that pair, but the 10s are quite a bit more expensive now than they were back then, and I don't need nor can I afford the fanciest top-of-the-line model these days. I have however become quite accustomed to the interior 'booty', and boots I've tried on that don't have one feel very strange to me. Because I have really small feet, it is especially important for me to choose the boot with the most up/down ankle flexibility for shifting/braking. I actually ordered a pair of Tech 7s from BikeBandit, only to get a notice shortly thereafter telling me that the model had been discontinued & was permanently out of stock. I'm assuming this was because of the size & color combination I selected, but y'all think I should just get the Tech 7s & assume I'll get used to the booty-free interior once they're broken in? 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites



Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:


  • Similar Content

    • By YzSKRILLA
      I have a 2014 yz125 runs fine only con is the bike won’t idle , sounds weak and anytime before powerband the bike like stutters until I’m in powerband it clears up and rides perfect my piston is unmarked I run my fuel ratio 32:1 my spark plug is fine i haven’t yet checked my carb.
      would my air screw cause this problem?
    • By ThumperTalk
      MURRIETA, CA – October 17, 2021 – (Motor Sports NewsWire) – The KTM JUNIOR RACING SX program, presented by Wells Fargo is ready to conduct its 23rd year of racing alongside the AMA Supercross Championship with the announcement of an exciting schedule in 2022. Continuing to lead the charge in innovation, participants will once again race aboard KTM’s potent electric minicycle – the KTM SX E-5 – on the global stage under KTM’s solar-powered semi. The 3.9-kilowatt powered KTM Junior Racing semi is equipped to power the entire semi on race day, including the 15 purpose-built charging stands, thanks to its 30 rooftop solar panels.
      For the upcoming season, applicants will be randomly chosen for the KTM JUNIOR RACING SX program and treated to a once-in-a-lifetime experience throughout the day, including a track viewing like the pros, two practice sessions, participation in Opening Ceremonies and a three-lap exhibition race on the very same tracks as their Supercross heroes. The 10-round schedule will kick off at the series opener in Anaheim, California on January 8, making stops at many of the nation’s premier stadiums before concluding in Denver, Colorado on April 30. At the end of the 10-round schedule, the winners from each individual round will be selected to participate in the ultimate “Championship Round” at the series finale in Salt Lake City, Utah on May 7.
      In support of the 2022 program, KTM is pleased to continue its partnership with Wells Fargo, who enters their second year as the program’s Presenting Sponsor. To further add to the excitement, longtime brand partner and Official Gear and Helmet of the KJSX program, Troy Lee Designs, has stepped up to offer all participants a free helmet, in addition to a full set of gear and a special race bib for race day. Alongside Troy Lee Designs, many of the program’s supporting partners return for another year, including Dunlop, Nihilo Concepts, 100 Percent, Ogio, Zingg, Leatt, Matrix Concepts, Motion Pro and Ethika.
      Registration is now open for the 2022 KTM JUNIOR RACING SX program, presented by Wells Fargo. Interested applicants must be 7-8 years old and meet the full requirements listed in the official rules. All rules and registration deadlines can be found at www.ktmjrsx.com.
      Source: KTM North America, Inc. 

    • By RTW2025
      Hey all,
      If embarking on such a project yourself, what would you choose as your starting point?
      I’m toying around with the idea of building a custom street scrambler build…
      Something lightweight and powerful with great road manners and genuine off-road ability.
      I’m thinking I’ll go for a large (+500cc) powerful single for a great power-to-weight ratio.
      I’ve got some ideas for the design elements I want to include for the finished aesthetics but can’t decide what bike to use a starting point? 
       
      If embarking on such a project yourself, what would you choose as your starting point? …and why?
    • By ThumperTalk
      Idaho native to race for American Honda’s new in-house amateur motocross program
      TORRANCE, CA – October 4, 2021 – (Motor Sports NewsWire) – American Honda announced today the signing of Chance Hymas, a talented young motocross rider with impressive results in amateur national events. The 16-year-old native of Pocatello, Idaho, will ride for Team Honda’s in-house amateur program.
      Hymas has enjoyed a respectable 2021 amateur season thus far, taking titles at Spring a Ding Ding (Open Pro Sport) and the James Stewart Spring Championship (250 Pro Sport), and finishing second overall at the AMA Amateur National Motocross Championship (Open Pro Sport and 250 Pro Sport) and the Scouting Moto Combine West. This season has also seen him dabble in off-road racing, tallying Pro 250 wins in WORCS and NGPC rounds.
      Hymas will make his Honda racing debut aboard a CRF250R at a local event this weekend. He’ll also campaign the Motoplayground Race in Ponca City, Oklahoma, and the Mini O’s. Next year will find him taking part in the Supercross Futures series and Amateur National motocross events, as well as the latter part of the AMA Pro Motocross series. Through his family’s Pocatello PowerSports dealership, Hymas will also continue to compete in selected off-road races. Hymas is scheduled to move to Team Honda HRC for the 2023 and ’24 seasons.
      Chance Hymas Racing Number: 21 Home: Pocatello, ID Birth Date: May 25, 2005 Height: 5’7” Weight: 140 lbs.
    • By redrider144
      Webb seemed really frustrated / relieved on the podium at Ironman.  That bike has been holding Webb and Marv back most of the summer.  Why would Roger force such a turd on his factory riders?  Wouldn't you think he's aware what McCarty did to the blue 450?
      I wonder what @KTMRider4Life thinks about this?
×
×
  • Create New...