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Simple Valve Compressor


Here is a cheap and easy way to compress your valve springs.

Tools Needed: Rag, Magnetic pen, and a metal bracket bent to shape.

Step 1. Buy a package of corner braces. The brand and size shown in photo1 will do nicely. Use a vise and hammer to shape bracket into photo 2.

Step 2. Place rag under valve to be compressed. Photo 3

Step 3. Place bracket as shown in photo 4 with magnetic pen in left hand.

Step 4. Using your hand, press down on valve spring and collect retainer collets as shown in photo5. Your done!

To install, simply place collets into position as shown in photo 6 (left valve). Then, just press down with hand using bracket as shown in photo 7, and collets usually fall into place. Sometimes you need to lightly tap one of the collets with your finger. Your done!

If you have to force, pry, or hammer; you're doing something wrong. It's as simple as it sounds.

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