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The Anaheim you didn't see on TV


Chris Cooksey

The Anaheim you didn't see on TV

 

Final Coverage of Anaheim 1; I'm going to focus on giving you the inside scoop on some information you watched but didn't get the full story (like when I asked Millsaps if he was sick, and everyone ran with). Starting with the 450 main where it ended before it began for Trey Canard. Sounds like he did some serious damage to his shoulder in a practice crash that caught up to him right before the main, where he left the starting line up 30 seconds before the gate dropped and after completing the hot lap. With that said seems weird that he was able to snatch the last spot in the LCQs about 30 minutes prior, sending Pourcel home. Not sure where his season goes from here, but it doesn't look good.

 

Chad Reed pulled out early in the Main after smashing his water pump on Westin Peick. If we know anything about Westin we know to go around him not through him! Mike Alessi suffered a horrific looking crash over the triple, he came up short and hit as hard as I have seen anyone hit… ever. After coming up short he appeared to lose consciousness while rolling into the next corner. Very scary, but I checked with the team after and they said Mike would be alright. They were also troubleshooting what failed on his bike ultimately causing the crash. Finally, Roczen put the entire field on notice while Dungey lagged behind by 13 seconds but only lost 3 points.

 

In the 250 class Mcelrath was a surprise winner, not too many people picked him to win. Meanwhile back in the pack Bradly Taft crashed early and came back to fight hard for 13th, look for good things from this kid. Justin Hill faded real quick after taking out his rookie teammate Forkner in the whoops. After the race was over Forkner lingered in the rider spectator area with his body language showing his anger. My guess is the PC rig just got really uncomfortable.

 

A few more random notes; looks like Vince Friese has a new enemy in Nick Schmidt as they did their best Bradshaw vs Matiasevich imitation for 17th and 18th. Tyler Enticknap had a spectacular crash in the LCQ that looked like he dove in a pond (puddle from the rain). Josh Hansen quit with a lap to go in the 250 LCQ while in 8th place, not sure why but it looked like he didn't want to be there. Can't wait to see what round 2 brings!


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