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Tire change the easy way


Chillwabbitt

Getting Started

OK go buy your new tire and leave it in the sun while you take off the old tire, the sun will soften up the rubber.

P1050362.jpg

Then you will need this really high tech tool, it's a 14' car tire or you can use 3 plastic buckets placed inside each other.

P1050364.jpg

Removing the old

Note: I removed the sprocket as I was changing it this is not a required step.

  1. Lay the old bike tire on the car tire.
    P1050365.jpg
  2. Remove the tube valve
  3. Undo but do not take off the rim lock nut and valve nut.
    P1050367.jpg
  4. Move the tire over to the edge of the car tire and stand on it to break the bead seal.
    P1050368.jpg
  5. Once the one side is done, flip it and repeat.
  6. Place your tire leavers in and start levering the tire up.
    P1050370.jpg
    Place the levers fairly close together, trying to do it like bellow will only make you curse or worse end up with a lever flipping back into your face.
    P1050369.jpg
  7. once you have the one side done, flip and repeat.
  8. At this point you should remove the tube (Please note the rubber mallet was used to knock out my axel and for nothing else).
    P1050372.jpg
  9. Now to get the tire off the rim, stand it up straight and place a foot on the top of the tire bend the tire off the rim (a buddy could really be of use here, but I didn't have one on hand so it is possible to do it on your own.)
    P1050374.jpg
  10. Inspect the rim and tube for and defects.

Installing the new

  1. Get you new tire and stand it upright.
  2. Now with the rim lock facing downward, place the rim in the tire. Using your foot so the rim does not pop out the other side of the tire. (Sorry no pic here as I can't take a pic and do this at the same time)
  3. Take your tire lever and work the tire onto the rim.
  4. Once the rim is inside the tyre, insert the tube (make sure there is a bit of air in it as it does help stop pinching.
  5. Now enter secret weapon (when at home anyway), a bucket with some dish washing liquid.
    P1050377.jpg
  6. Take a sponge and apply a generous helping of the mix to the wall of the tire.
    P1050378.jpg
  7. Now lever on the one side.
    P1050381.jpg
  8. Flip the tire and repeat on the other side. (the secret her is not to try take on to big a section of tire as mentioned before.)
  9. and done.
    P1050384.jpg
  10. Reinstall the wheel as normal.
    P1050387.jpg
  11. pump up the tire so you know the bead has seated correctly (it normally makes a popping sound but not always)
  12. Go ride.

OK I had a bit of bad luck it started to rain on me so the tire was not as soft as I would have liked.

Heres a pic of the old and the new. I ride quite a bit of rock so the tire wears more in the middle but they still hold up really well.

P1050376.jpg


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