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  • scottiedawg

    Ready! Camera! Action! Making Your Ride Video POP!

    By scottiedawg

    So many of us have one. We drag it around each ride. Some mount it to our helmets, some put it on a chest, and yet some use it with a tripod. The action camera has been a catalyst in the world of sports to bring all of its excitement to a screen near you. I remember back in college duct taping a big VHS camera around our bodies as we leapt off bridges. We loved to revisit the adventure later on. There is something captivating about sharing experiences with others. It's part of a visual storytelling phenomenon in which many have become addicted. I am one of them. Have you ever sat through a treacherous three minute ride video that your buddy put together? He was so stoked about it, but as you reached the 20 second mark you wanted to do something else? Was it all taken from the latest GoPro mounted on his helmet? The sound consisted of a wound out two stroke at blaring levels? Yeah, I've been there. In fact, that may have been one of my earlier videos. I ride dirtbikes in one of the coolest places on the planet. As I have been exploring the backcountry of Peru over the years, I have picked up some great ride shots via my handy little GoPro. Times have changed a bit with technology. Now, I capture 4k footage straight onto my phone, I can fly a drone above and beyond to bring even better footage back home to show the audience. The mount options are infinite as well as the gadgets for taking different shots. All of this technology has opened up a new passion for me. I have combined my longing to lay my tires on new tracks with the thrill of capturing the right shot. I also love to write and tell stories. Over the past decade, I have developed a pet peeve with bad videos. I certainly cannot claim to be top drawer when it comes to talent, but there are a few things that I have learned along the way that can help you put better videos together. I have included my latest ride video of a group of three guys and myself that hammered our way through some great riding in the Andes of Peru. It is more of a ride video and not much of a story video. My plan is to use it as an example. Whether you think it's good or bad is your opinion.  My hope is that you can improve the viewability of your videos with just a couple of practical and simple to use techniques. Besides, you want people to enjoy your work.
      Keep the camera still Whenever possible, use a tripod, a rock, a prop up device to keep the camera from moving while taking the shot. This goes for those that are using basic stuff. If you don't have a gimbal (most riders don't carry one around in their tool pouch) use creativity to figure out a way to place your camera on a solid spot. Personally I almost always use a flexible, three legged tripod to mount my Samsung S7. I can place it anywhere, I keep it in my pocket on my riding pants, and can set it up before the guys come around the corner and into the shot. Take short clips If you have ever spent much time editing, you understand. Large files have to be processed by your computer even if you only want a three second clip of a 45 minute file. Another reason to keep them short is for entertainment purposes. Mainstream movies change camera views and angles each few seconds. Its so you don't get bored with the film. Same thing goes for your ride video. Mix it up where possible. Many Points of View As I mentioned above, changing camera angles will make your video easier to watch. If you watch a 5 minute video of the same helmet mounted GoPro footage, you might die. It's boring for most everybody that wasn't on the bike. Its OK to use helmet mounts, but change the scene. Stop and film your buddies zipping by as they bang through the rocks. Pan around and take in some pretty scenes. Follow along on that gnarly section of trail. Get in your buddy's face and ask him about how he crashed. Film a high five or fist bump. Mix those in with your video and you will make it much more enjoyable to watch. Length of Video Keep your edits between two and three minutes preferably, and under five minutes for best audience gain. Many of the professionals on social media talk about how important it is to keep things short. People have little windows of time that they can sneak in a Youtube video. If you have a 45 minute movie, they probably won't be able to check it out while on their coffee break. They also won't run over to Charlie and say, "Hey, check this one out!"  In my experience, it's like pricing...Keep it under the minute markers...do a 2:59 second video instead of a 3:02 video. In general, the shorter the better. I try to keep ride videos to the three to four minute mark per day. Pack the best stuff in there and get rid of the rest. People will watch your videos much more often. In addition, there are limits on social media for file size and video quality. Last thing you want to do is make a cool video to find out the file is too big for your Facebook page. Keep Edits Simple You don't need to add a million crazy transitions or graphics. Unless it is done well, its more of a distraction. Transition from shot to shot with basic cuts. Is easier and works well with ride videos. The Rule of Thirds This is a time tested film and photo basic...Take your screen and divide it into thirds, up and down and side to side. Basically make a tic tac toe board on your screen. Place your subject in one of the corners of the middle square. If you have a full length subject that takes most of the height of the screen, place the subject on one of the up and down lines. It creates perspective and makes a better shot. Same goes with horizons and mountain backgrounds. Place them on one of the horizontal thirds to make your image more pleasing.

    Subject is not centered in the middle of the frame...but rather on one of the 1/3 lines.   Sound If you don't record good sound with your video, don't put it in there. If you are making a sandwich and the bread is bad, it will make your whole sandwich bad, even if you have the best cheese and meat. Cover up with clear voice over or music. Smart phones usually have good sound recording for videos. Use the best you have available, and if you have little to work with, put in more music. Story You are trying to tell as story each time you make a video. Keep an eye out for things that stand out to make your story interesting. A wreck, funny things people say, beautiful scenery, obstacles and struggles, and anything else that stands out in your story. Highlight it with clips that you have taken and your video will be better for it. As for the video that I included in the post, look it over. I have put many of these principles into practice. It's not perfect, but imagine what it would be like to have only on point of view, or mumbled GoPro sound? Do yourself and your friends a favor and make those videos more entertaining to watch. Until the next time...keep the wheels down. Scottiedawg   Scott Englund is a social entrepreneur living in Cusco Peru. Scott operates MotoMission Peru, which offers super exotic hard enduro tours through the Andes. You can check out MotoMission Peru by visiting the website at www.Motomissionperu.com or find them on Facebook or check out other ride videos and media on the MotoMission Peru Dirtbike Adventures YouTube Channel. Feel free to contact Scott right here through TT if you have any questions about MotoMission Peru.
     
    • 6 comments
    • 2,052 views
  • Garrahan Off-Road Training

    Braking simultaneously with Garrahan Offroad Training

    By Garrahan Off-Road Training

    In this offroad motorcycle training video, I want to show you the benefits of using your front and rear brakes at the same time for maximum control and speed. Give it a watch, see how you're doing, and of course, hit me up in the comment section below if you have any questions or comments. Brian Garrahan Off-road Training
       
    • 6 comments
    • 3,068 views
  • scottiedawg

    C'mon Dad!

    By scottiedawg

    Over the course of my time operating MotoMission Peru, I have had various opportunities to host/guide dirt bike adventures with other riders. I have a special place in my heart for father/son adventures. I guess it must have something to do with the sentiment I have with my dad.   Official MotoMission Tour Video...Check the others on our Youtube Channel   Dirtbikes and Dads go together When Tony and Joran contacted me about doing a tour, my excitement level rose. A father/son combo with limited dirt bike experience would be a challenge, but a welcome one. I normally cater to seasoned riders, but his one would put a different pressure on me as the guide. I needed to push these guys to their limits, while completing a route within our time frame of four days. The terrain needed to fit both the skill level and the distance we needed to cover each day. The fellas wanted to roll their tires over some amazing parts of Peru, get some mind blowing pics,  and live to tell about it. A face with a smile tells a story My work was cut out for me. I put Joran on a crf 230 because of his size and experience. Dad, Tony, was on the Husky 300, I rode a Honda 450x. I figured I could swap out with one of them if I needed. Bike selection worked out perfectly. The route itself was ideal. It was a mix of single track, some rough two track, and some free ride(go where ever you want) type of stuff. It was perfect to try a hand at hill climbs, scare oneself silly on rock fixtures, and put the tires on the edge of mountain ledges to make the heart flutter a bit. The ride was fantastic. Tony and Joran both expanded their riding level to new heights. In fact, I was able to coach the guys on various little riding tricks that someone showed me along my journey.  Stand up more, focus eyes on where you want to go,  as well as some mechanics of body positioning and how it relates to traction and control. It was a bit of a seminar/riding school/test day. No doubt that the guys are better riders now. I thoroughly enjoyed that part of the tour.

    The view they wanted to see!
      When it all boils down, we had a fantastic four days of riding. Each were pushed to the limit various times each day. When the heads hit the pillows each night, it took no time for the sleep to begin.  Smiles were abundant, and there were no shortages of whoops, hollars, and high fives.

    Certainly another successful tour!   MotoMission Peru is a social enterprise operated by Scott Englund. If you want to see the Andes via dirtbike, this is how to do it. High quality in every aspect. Service, guide, routes, equipment, and overall experience cannot be beat. Contact Scott via Thumpertalk messaging or at scott@motomissionperu.com for more information.
    • 3 comments
    • 1,873 views
  • Coach Robb

    4 Rest Day Tips That Fast Riders Follow

    By Coach Robb

    Between riders riding and racing every weekend, a frequent question is how to recover properly.  If you have followed me for any period of time, you know that I am an advocate for one day of rest per week and to pull back the overall volume and intensity every six weeks to allow your body to rejuvenate both mentally and physically (at a blood chemistry level). What does that look like? 1. Rest Means Rest: this is not the day to go to a theme park,run errands that have you outside and in the heat and humidity, etc. Anything that is stressful on your body should be avoided. Note doing a sport specific event “easy” is not the idea of a rest day. Instead schedule a massage, read a book, go to a movie or go to lunch with an old friend. 2. Take a Nap: when your body gets into REM (rapid eye movement) level 3, it releases hGH (human growth hormone) which make you both lean and facilitates recovery. Make the room dark and cold, eat a quality snack and consume 5-8 ounces of cold water prior to lying down. 3. Contrast Therapy: the goal here is to expose the muscle tissue to the largest temperature deviation that you can tolerate; the bigger the temperature spread between hot and cold the better. If you complete in the shower, strive for 2 minutes hot – 30 seconds cold. If you utilize a bath, strive for 4 minutes hot, 1 minute cold). Repeat 2 to 4 times. 4. Loosen your muscles up: go for a therapeutic massage or take a yoga class the night prior to your rest day. Spend 20 minutes both in the morning and the evening foam rolling and working on trigger points. Gotta' slow down sometimes to go fast!
    If you have any questions, comments, or suggestion for a future article, hit me up on the comments section below. I enjoy hearing from you. Oh, and don't forget to tap that "Follow" button so that you're notified when I post new tips on reaching your highest potential. Coach Robb Beams
    Complete Racing Solutions About Coach Robb  
    • 2 comments
    • 1,158 views
  • Coach Robb

    4 Reason (and solutions) Why Your Training is Making You Fat and Slow!

    By Coach Robb

    Mistake #1: Not knowing YOUR sport specific heart rate training zone Your maximum heart rate number changes specific to the sport that you are training and racing.  For example, your maximum heart rate on the motorcycle will be higher than on a bicycle (because of the amount of muscle you are using).  A frequent mistake athletes make is completing a maximum heart rate assessment within one discipline and then use the established heart rate training zones across all forms of training and racing.  An additional mistake is using the generic algorithms that are programed into heart rate monitors.  When you plug in your age, height, body weight and activity level, the watch is programmed to provide you GENERIC heart rate zones.  The most accurate assessment of your maximum heart rate is to complete field testing every 6 – 8 weeks. Solution #1: Complete Sport Specific Time Trials and Determine Your Maximum Heart Rate [Note: your maximum heart rate varies from sport to sport – the more muscle you utilize, the higher your heart rate] Your maximum heart rate changes as your aerobic engine improves.  The stronger your aerobic base, the lower your resting heart rate.  With this being said, your maximum heart rate will come down as well because the heart can pump the necessary amounts of oxygenated blood to the working muscles at a lower number because it is “stronger” and pumps more volume of blood with each beat.  Over the duration of my career, I have found the following field tests as a solid indicator of maximum heart rate along with muscular endurance: Swimming: 500 yards (capture your interval at each 100 yard interval) Cycling: 10 miles (capture your elapsed time and heart rate at the five mile and ten mile mark) Running: 3 miles (capture your elapsed time and heart rate at each mile marker) For physical strength, I have a customized Plyometric routine that I feel tests your lactate tolerance and anaerobic thresholds.  This test is EXTREMELY difficult and requires a doctor’s approval.  If you have your doctor’s approval and would like a copy of this Plyometric Assessment, please email me directly.   Mistake #2: Not Testing and Evaluating Your Training Efforts Correctly When you complete your maximum heart rate assessments through time trials, you want to make sure that you are not fatiguing the muscles too quickly which keep you from accurately testing the strength of your heart (specifically oxygen volume as it fuels your working muscles with oxygenated blood). Keep in mind that there is a difference between muscular endurance and muscular power.  If you muscles fatigue due to excessive load or exertion, you will not push your heart into its upper limits.  The key is knowing how to evaluate your time trial results.  Below mistake number three, I will outline testing protocols along with how to evaluate them correctly.  Solution #2: Allow for an Adequate Warm Up When you are attempting to test your aerobic engine, you need to make sure that you don’t increase your intensity too quickly for two reasons. First: the muscles need adequate time to warm up (usually 20-30 minutes) so that you don’t use the first half of your assessment as your “warm up”.  Second: trying to hit maximum effort too early.  The idea is to see what your maximum is over the entire duration, not the first five minutes.    Mistake #3: Following a Generic Training Plan Following a generic training plan that doesn’t take into consideration your training background, physical abilities and availability of time to train will lead to performance plateaus, illness and injuries. Within our performance programs, we factor in your testing results, physical limiters (see Mistake #2), goals and objectives as we develop your training program.  Too frequently I interview new clients who are frustrated with their last year of training and racing because they don’t see any improvements despite the consistency in their training.  The reason for this is that the efforts are not being quantified and the athlete spends too much time in the “grey zone” that yields little to no improvements in performance.  Solution #3: Begin Following a Scientifically Backed Training Program If you would like to begin maximizing your training efforts, please email me and let’s get a nutrition & performance program built for you ASAP!  I guarantee that you will burn body fat, build muscle and improve both your speed and endurance in as little as 12 weeks.  Stop the insanity of training without a plan and email me today.   Mistake #4: Not Eating Enough Fat, Protein and Raw Fruits & Vegetables Many athletes become fat and protein phobic because of the misinformation that is floating around on the internet and morning shows.  The truth of the matter is that the body needs more protein and fat than you can even begin to imagine. Simply put, lean protein re-builds torn down muscle.  If you want to build more muscle you have to eat protein.  Lean protein also supports your immune system which helps protect you against viruses and being down and out being sick. Clean fat will help your body recover from the oxidative stress of aerobic exercise (at all intensity levels).  Eating raw fruits and vegetables will provide your body with the necessary vitamins and minerals to both produce energy as well as recover from your daily training.   Solution #4: Begin Eating More Protein, Fat and Raw Vegetables & Fruits to Burn Body Fat and Improve Your Speed & Endurance The only two things that satisfy appetite is fat and protein – NOTHING ELSE.  If you are on a low fat, low protein diet, you will never experience the true feeling of being full.  This will negatively affect your ability to sleep (which makes you gain weight because your body doesn’t have the chance to release human growth hormone (hGH) which is responsible for making you lean).  The key to burning fat and building muscle is to satisfy your appetite so that you can sleep deeply (REM patter three).  When you get to REM pattern three your body rejuvenates from the inside out and allows your body to release human growth hormone naturally – you will wake up both refreshed and leaner.  However, it starts with real, raw fruits, vegetables, high quality fats and lean protein. You can now see that by training with a scientific, yet simplistic approach will yield the long-term results that you have been always wanting.  I look forward to hearing from each of you and how me and my staff can help you and your program. Until next time, Train Smart-Not Hard! -Coach Robb   About Coach Robb and MotoE (CompleteRacingSolutions.com)  Coach Robb has been working with riders and racers since 1987 and is the founder of the Complete Racing Solutions Performance System, the Mental Blueprint of Success, the MotoE Amateur Development Program, the MotoE Educational Series and a nutritional consultant to Nutritionally Green Supplements based out of Orlando Florida. CompleteRacingSolutions.com is a premium resource center for motocross, supercross and GNCC riders of all abilities and ages.  Visit CompleteRacingSolutions.com & subscribe to his monthly newsletter that outlines the training solutions used by Factory KTM/Red Bull Ryan Dungey, Geico Honda's Jeremy Martin, Factory KTM/Red Bulll Alix Martin, Factory Kawasaki/Pro-Circuit Adam Cianciarulo, multi-time Loretta Lynn & Mini O Amateur Champion Jordan Bailey (Factory Rockstar/Husqvarna), Factory KTM/Red Bull Broc Tickle, Factory Kawasaki/Pro-Circuit Stilez Robertson, off road riders Charlie Mullins (Factory KTM/Red Bull), Chris Bach and Ryan Overton along with quad racer Roman Brown (Factory Yamaha) along with thousands of riders all around the world who have families, hold full time jobs and just love to ride and race motorcycles.   Instructional videos with Coach Robb can be found on the Coach Robb’s YouTube Channel addressing rider’s questions about speed, endurance, strength, nutrition, biomechanics, stretching, and soft tissue maintenance. You can also find articles and videos at CompleteRacingSolutions.com relevant to riders of all abilities.  If you are into social media, you can find him on Twitter: @MotoCoachRobb, Instagram: CoachRobbBeams and Facebook: Coach Robb.  If you are into podcasts, CLICK HERE for his first three shows where he outlined: How to Eat Healthy on $10 a Day; Importance of Sleep and It's Influence on Weight Loss; The Dangers of Over-Hydrating.    
    • 0 comments
    • 3,510 views

Days 1-3: The Journey Begins

I didn't sleep the night of August 1st, too much anticipation, too much energy, all pent up like a kid waiting for St. Nick to slide down the chimney and drop off gifts to be played with in the morning. I got out of bed early, there was no sense in delaying it any longer. I went through my routine of brewing coffee, frying a couple eggs and having breakfast as hurriedly as ever. After breakfast I checked my bags for, probably, the 100th time to make sure I had all the gear I could stuff in them and that I hadn't left anything out because I would need it all for the next week. I checked every drawer and under the bed and in the washer and dryer to make sure nothing remained. When I was sure the bags were good to go I made my way down to the garage to begin to load my truck before I had to leave for work. First, I got both bikes in the bed of the truck. I took my 2012 KTM 300XC and 2017 450 SX-F(never take a SX bike to ride CO single track, more on that later). Then came all manner of spare parts, fluids, lubricants, cleaners, tools, anything you can think of that you might need to keep a bike running properly. Off I go to work. I don't have a clue what happened at work that day. All I know is at 5 o'clock I'm leaving and heading to the Airbnb I booked in south GA. It was a hot day and I had been hot all day at work hopped in the truck to leave and about an hour down the road had to pull off at a rest stop and puke, not the best start to my trip, but between the heat and my excitement to get going I got queezy. I got back on the road and had an uneventful rest of the trip to Lake Park. Got in at about 10 and went to bed pretty quickly as I needed to be up early the next day.  5 a.m. came soon enough but I was still rearing to go. I got dressed, had my coffee and headed out before daylight on my way to Columbus, GA. Halfway there I stopped in Tifton, GA to get on Highway 82 and grab some Chick-Fil-A breakfast at exit 62 off I75. Nothing else would suffice. By the time 11 rolled around I made it to a U-haul location and picked up the 6x12 enclosed trailer that we had reserved for the trip because I don't own an enclosed trailer, no one else driving out did and I couldn't find anyone to lend me one. At $30 a day, though, I wasn't really worried about it. *Props to U-Haul btw, that trailer pulled great and had all kinds of tie down points. I would not hesitate to get one again.* After picking up the trailer my next stop for most of the day was Tallassee, AL where I picked up my first comrade and took a driving break to work on bikes.  My 450 is a track bike and it typically stays in tip top shape because the track is not the place to have a failure of any sort because it always happens up the face of a jump or in the air. So it didn't need anything at all. My 300 was having clutch issues. To try to remedy this I bought a master cylinder rebuild kit and installed it to no avail, it actually got worse so I put the stock components back in. After I put the rebuild kit in it I COULD NOT get the clutch to take fluid when the lever was actuated so I ended up back bleeding it completely full and it somehow worked. Right then I went online to Rocky Mountain and ordered a new complete clutch master and had it sent to our accommodations in CO. This would prove to be a damn good decision.  My friend, Josh, was taking his ragged 1994 Honda CR250R... I had zero faith in that bike. Before we could leave it needed new tubes and tires, and a new clutch pack. I also decided that we should put grease in every place that would take grease to be safe. This guy had been riding about 6 months, never on a motorcycle of any kind before, at the time so I gave him a crash course in how to change tires and tubes. I wasn't sure any of this work would be worth it. If you can imagine the most clapped out 1994 CR250 that actually still runs and moves under its own power; this is that bike, 100 percent. Suspension just feels like its only working on the springs, clutch is on/off, brakes are very much absent, no power band just on or off(later discovered the power valve assembly was stuck open), so so so loud with smoke pouring out of the head pipe connection to the cylinder, EVERYTHING rattles, the kicker only catches 1/3 of the time, but alas the bike works well enough for this particular rider.  Anyhow, we clean up and get everything back together and load up in the trailer. Next was to swap trucks with my father for the remainder of the trip. I love my '96 Z71 but I don't love it enough to drive it to Colorado from Alabama, South FL to AL was quite enough. I can't thank him enough for letting us take his truck. That kept us from needing another rental. Hard to believe that out of the 6 riders travelling from Alabama to Colorado none of us have a full size truck or SUV that is cross country worthy. By now, with just the 2 of us, the truck and trailer are loaded down with enough supplies for an army of riders and mechanics. At 7 P.M. we roll out of Tallassee and head to Guntersville, AL for the last leg of the day to meet up with the rest of the guys going with us. We stopped in Birmingham to pick up the 4th bike going in the trailer and roll up to Guntersville around 11 P.M. to meet the last 3 riders. Once there we elect not to put another bike in the trailer and the last 2 will ride in the bed of the 2nd truck going to CO. I can't tell you how great it felt to be back with all the boys, everyone together again. We all met in college at Auburn and have since moved off to Florida, South Carolina, and Tennessee. After catching up over a few beers it was time to head to bed for the night and get a few hours sleep before rolling out early Saturday morning.  The next 20 hours of my life are some of the least exciting times I have ever lived through. The three of us riding in my truck, being young and bold, decided that driving straight through the entire day and night to get there before the next morning was the best course of action so off we went leaving the other three riders asleep in the house. Nashville to Paducah and on up to St. Louis and past the great arch. We encountered a classic Lamborghini Countach on the west side of St. Louis; trying to catch up to it loaded down with bikes and gear in a half ton truck was pretty comical. It didn't work. We traveled onward to Columbia then hit KC before sundown. We stopped only for gas, and you basically don't drink because making special stops to take a leak wastes too much time on a trip that long. Once on the west side of KC you have reached the absolute worst part of the trip: Kansas. Nothing about Kansas is cool, at least on I70. I had been awake long enough so it was time for me to pass out so that I would be prepared to co-pilot in case the drive dosed off or I needed to drive the last leg of the trip. I was in and out of sleep through Kansas and I remember sleepily waving to the "Welcome to Colorado" Sign. I came to just before Denver as we were stopping for gas and the current driver was done for the night. Driver number three takes over heading into Denver. We make it through the Mile High City unscathed and up we go over the mountains. I now find out the driver 3 has never driven in the mountains. It's after midnight, and he is pulling a trailer. I can't describe how painfully slow he was driving at this point. Somewhere just after the Eisenhower tunnel we got our first head nod from him so I am wide-ass awake now. After another few miles it happened again and I reached over and took the wheel from the passenger seat and shook him really hard. We pulled over very quickly and I took over. That was one of the scarier points in life.  I was wide awake with fear, mostly, at this point. I got us on to Silverthorne fairly quickly and off I70 onto CO Highway 9. We reached Kremmling almost instantly or so it felt. Then I hopped on US 40 to take us into Steamboat Springs. Both of my friends were passed out so I had no choice but to be on point driving and not feel an ounce of tiredness. I was scared to even yawn or sneeze. It's a real shame that we were driving through CO at night, Josh had never seen it, Patrick hadn't been in over a year, and I hadn't seen it since January but that made the morning that much more special. We uneventfully pulled up to Promontory Condominiums about 3 A.M on Sunday August 5th, where two of the riders who live in CO were waiting on us. We unceremoniously went straight to bed. It took me 58 hours to go 2,300 miles from Fort Myers, FL to Steamboat. Not bad!  

AUbraaap

AUbraaap

Its time to Unionize off-road-riding! Main reason for..

News team assemble! The reason it’s time we all unionize. Most municipal governments, depending on what country you live in, have an urbanization action plan. An urbanization action plan involves the moving rural residents into a more densely populated area. The reason for this is to reduce the cost of having a sprawling population. It is more expensive to maintain utilities and emergency services in a less densely populated area then a more dense one. Not only is the service area larger, but there is less income per km/mile squared. A municipality, in the face of rising labor and resource costs, therefor must either raise municipal taxes (at potentially the cost of an election or re-election) or promote more people to move into residential developments to increase the tax revenue received. What does this have to do with us? Well, there is only a certain amount of riding space available, and the more residential developments that are built in a municipality, the more in demand real estate becomes. Now all of a sudden the riding area we have enjoyed so much becomes a very high priced commodity and the return on investment for having this area as a recreational area no longer becomes feasible.  There are certain protected pieces of land that probably will not become a residential development, but that doesn’t mean that it’s safe from having off-road motorcycles yanked out of it. As residents start living closer and closer, the potential for complaints about noise, speed and destruction of property also increase in proportion. In fact, a lot of residential developments have boards, committees and meetings. The public has unionized, and so must we! A loose collection of riders has no face. No voice. No reason to be there. A well-organized association of riders with respected members of the municipality on it has a well-known face, a loud voice and can present a business case as to why the municipality should keep, nay, expand the riding area! Before getting into the world of off-road riding, I had assumed that I would be riding with groups mostly in their teens and 20’s. I did not expect that at 33 I would be one of the youngest riders at most of the events I have attended. I think it’s widely assumed by most lay persons that dirt biking is done by mostly teens and young adults, and to be honest, city councilors and municipal leaders don’t care about them as much. They have entry level jobs so they do not pay a lot of income tax, they do not own property so they do not pay property tax and they do not have a lot of disposable income to spend in the community. So why would they sacrifice a quick cash injection of selling off land, or the use/licensing of the land, for a bunch of people that cannot make a return on the investment of a riding area? They won’t. The off-road association I am a member of in my area has over 200 members. The average age of the members that I have come across is 35-50. This association has well respected members of the community who go to city council meetings and give voice to our members. They inform the council that our members own property in the area, pay into the municipal coffers and have disposable income which is spent at the local dealerships, garages, restaurants and gas stations. They connect with the local business owners and provide information on who our members are, and how often we come to their establishments to spend money. They get momentum from local business and provide the municipal councils with a sound business case on how it is in their best interest to have us around. Government officials love business cases. There are two things that rev the motors of a politician, and that is getting votes and making money. Without the solid, well presented hard evidence of the number of votes and the dollar figure spent by the off-road community and riding association, they have nothing to justify to the public the reason for keeping riding areas open to us.   I have noticed that the demographic in my area is missing riders in their teens and twenties. If you are reading this and you fit into that category, do us all a favor and join your local riding association. Yes, it may be a bit of money and I know it can be tough to pay for all these passes and memberships at the same time as keeping your bike on the trail, maybe ask for it as a Christmas, birthday, and bris present? I guess you can only get a bris present once though, unless you really are willing to sacrifice for the cause….But if you wish to keep on riding in the future, it is a very necessary thing. It’s not just paying for a membership, its having you counted, and we need every +1 we can get.   If you’re already a part of an association then I urge you to get involved with volunteering and getting involved with the Board of your association. Right now it seems that the baby boomers are taking care of us. It is easy to take this for granted. Once they are no longer able to ride, they will leave it to us. If we have not gained the skills required to go in and persuade the municipalities to keep our riding areas, then we will lose them in short order. The couch sitters, the TV zombies and the indoor enthusiasts have unionized. And so must we.  Rise up and be counted.

Husquire

Husquire

 

ret·ro·spec·tive /ˌretrəˈspektiv/

My new old 2013 XR650L! Like many others, I too can tend to get caught up in the endless race to have the latest and greatest techno gadget, bike, firearm or whatever.  But, many years and dollars later, I have realized that the race is futile and the satisfaction of obtaining the object of our desire is ephemeral.  The new wears off quick, but the payments seem to go on forever! It was not that long ago, that I would have scoffed at the idea of not having modern inverted, fully adjustable cartridge forks, fuel injection, at least 50 HP and feather light weight on a motorcycle that goes off-road. Also, I have pursued the elusive unicorn of a bike that can “do it all”.  It does not exist.  No bike can do everything well; so, unless you have the means to have a bike for every mission, you will be riding a bike that is a conglomeration of compromises. 
The loved but gone KLR650 My last, and recently sold, old tech bike was my 2013 KLR650.  I took a lot of time to tweak it to my satisfaction, and I really hated to sell it.  But, for most of the dual sport riding that I do locally, I am in deep sand, mud, occasional whoops, brush and tight spaces.  The big girl weighed about 445 lbs. (as I had built her), and she just wasn’t built for that mission.  So, I had to say goodbye.  But, she found a new home with Barry, who purchased her to do the Trans America Trail.  That is what I built her for! I pondered many replacement choices, such as the modern KTM 690 Enduro R and Husqvarna 701 Enduro, as well as the KTM 500EXC and the new 2019 Honda CRF450L.  I also thought hard about the old school Suzuki DR650S and DRZ400.  I considered older KTM and Husqvarna big bore thumpers too.  All of them could have worked for me, with each having its own strengths and weaknesses. In the end, I decided to go old school and purchase a used bike to keep cost down.  I also wanted to have a simple bike, that is easy to work on.  I liked the idea of screw & locknut verses shim over bucket or shim under bucket valves. The ability to do a valve adjustment with just a wrench and screwdriver, in under 30 minutes, was very appealing to me.  I also liked the idea of an air-cooled engine.  I certainly know that these features don’t allow for the most precise tolerances and high performance, but that was not what this bike was to be about for me.  I have other modern bikes that fill that niche.  Also, OEM and aftermarket parts availability were a primary concern. Other requirements were long travel suspension that could be made to work well off-road, a high ground clearance, 350 lbs. max weight, a torque rich motor and the ability to carry moderately loaded soft luggage for long trips.  I required a bike that handles single track reasonably well, but also can comfortably run at 70 mph all day and be reasonably comfortable for 300 miles of pavement on out of state dual-sport rides.  My local dual-sport rides are typically about 90 miles of pavement (round trip) and 20-30 miles of trails. Lastly, one of the non-quantifiable and intangible requirements for this bike was to take me back to a simpler time, to my early teens.  A time when I was in the garage tinkering with my 1973 Honda CT70H, or my Bultaco Pursang 175, while listening to Led Zeppelin or Heart.  It was a time when the only news I got was delivered by Walter Cronkite and the only correspondence was via the US Mail.  I would happily surrender my Android, computer, internet and 60” flat screen to go back to a time when people actually talked to each other. A time that we only had 3 TV channels to watch, but somehow it was more than enough. I ultimately bought a 2013 Honda XR650L.  It fit the above requirements better than anything else I could come up with. As a bonus, red is my favorite color!
Maiden voyage of the BRP. With @Bryan Bosch at the Historic Richloam Gen Store (Est. 1921) Bryan Bosch standing next to the orange rocket and the BRP.  This was the BRP's maiden voyage to Richloam.  This photo is in front of the historic Richloam General Store.  If you like to see cool, old things, go check this place out.  One of the interesting things on display is an old 1902? Sears Roebuck catalog.  In it, you can see listings for items such as a Marlin lever action rifle for $12.00.  This ride is the typical mission that I wanted the BRP for.  I am not in a hurry or trying to set the world's fastest pace.  I want to slow down and travel back to a simpler time! Today was a double bonus for me, as I got to ride my BRP for the first time, and I got to try out my new USWE Ranger 9 Hydration Pack.  I love the pack for its innovative features and comfort.  The biggest plus for the USWE is that it does not shift and bounce around on your back.  See the @Bryan Bosch full review of it which will be forthcoming.   USWE Ranger 9               "No Dancing Monkey"       My new (to me) BRP is my current project.  I am building it with the following objectives: Improve suspension performance to accommodate my weight (200lbs.) and riding style (aggressive). Improve engine performance without sacrificing reliability or the ability to run on regular, low octane gas. Reduce weight. Increase fuel range. Tailor ergonomics for me (6’2”, 34-inch inseam). Streamline and de-clutter unnecessary hardware. Reinforce rear subframe to handle heavier cargo loads. Upgrade lighting to high output LED’s. Upgrade handguards to something more trail-worthy than the OEM guards. Install Garmin Amps Rugged Mount with connection to battery. Install battery tender lead that also powers my Antigravity Batteries Micro-Start Mini Tire Inflator Replace OEM mirrors with mirrors that swing out of the way (without tools) for trail use. Over twenty years ago, shortly after getting out of the military, I had an XR600R that I used for trail riding and hare scrambles.  I raced it at a couple of MX races (for fun) even though I also had a YZ250 at the time.  Thus, I had a general idea of what I would be getting into with the XR650L. This photo of me on my XR600R was taken at the Reddick Hare Scrambles in 1996.  Man, that Supertrapp was LOUD!  It did make passing a little easier, because the noise usually scared the rider in front out of the way.  I loved that bike (once I got it started).
@xmxvet racing a BRP     You meet the nicest people (or puppies) on a dual-sport!  @Bryan Bosch with a sweet little dog that was either lost or abandoned deep in Richloam.  She was hot and dehydrated.  Bryan skillfully carried her on his KTM 690 Enduro R back to civilization where we were able to find a nice family to take her in.   BRP mods have commenced!   The first thing I am doing to the XR650L is to reduce weight by removing unnecessary parts and clutter.  The first two pounds were simple.  I removed the passenger foot pegs.   The next item to go was the AIS (Air Injection System) or Smog Pump.  This not only removes two pounds, but also cleans up the clutter on left side of the motor and gets rid of the lean deceleration pop.  Some have reported that it can slightly improve throttle response as well.  I haven't had a chance to evaluate the performance aspect yet.  Removal of the AIS requires the use of an inexpensive smog block off kit.   Here's a before and after photo: Before After On the scale.  2 pounds gone! Next, I removed the seat strap which was unnecessary for my purposes and uncomfortable.  I also removed the front reflectors.  This bike will rarely be ridden at night. Today, I installed a set of Renthal 971-08  7/8" handlebars.  These are the OEM bars on my 2017 KX450F.  I like the bend of the bars a lot.  Additionally, I prefer 7/8" bars over 1 1/8" bars for the slightly softer (more flex) feel.  I have arthritis in all of my joints, and hard impacts like roots, square edged braking bumps or slap down landings off of jumps can take a toll on my wrists.  Fat bars feel harsher to me.   An additional benefit is the crossbar which I like because it is a place to mount my Giant Loop handlebar bag.  I have also found that the crossbar is a very convenient and comfortable place to rest my hand while making inputs into my Garmin Montana 680T. The Renthal 971-08 bars are about 7 oz. lighter than the OEM bars, and have a lot less sweep.  The sweep on the OEM bars felt like it placed my hands in my lap, and my wrists were bent at an uncomfortable angle.  The 971's are a huge improvement over the OEM bars! OEM bars Renthal 971-08   Renthal 971-08 (top) vs OEM (bottom).   The 971-08's have much less sweep, but have about the same rise.  Even though I am tall, I prefer lower bars, as I feel more connected to the front of the bike with lower bars.  Tall bars make a bike's steering feel sort of vague to me, instead of precise.   Plus, the "attack" position feels more natural with lower bars, as it naturally pulls you more over the front wheel of the bike. I got to try out these handlebars last weekend and they are a huge improvement over the stock bars.  I had a minor "duel-sport" collision with @bryan bosch on his KTM 690 Enduro R.  This leads me to my next mod which is my Doubletake "Enduro" Mirrors.  Bryan has the Doubletake "Adventure" mirrors on his 690.  In the collision, his right mirror pivoted around and was completely unscathed, performing as designed!  The mirror design not only prevents the mirror itself from getting damaged, but also protects the front brake and clutch perches from breaking.   Here's some pics of the mirrors I just installed: Retracted for trail riding I love the mirrors!  The optical clarity seems even better than the OEM Honda mirrors, as the rear view images seem sharper.  And, they do not add any weight to the bike.  This is a quote from their website: "We will warranty the mirror body for the life of the product, but for obvious reasons cannot extend the same protection to the glass insert. We do sell the glass separately if you manage to break it. We also have a satisfaction guarantee—if you receive your mirror and aren't happy with it for any reason, you can return it for a refund."  All of the components are replaceable, and use Ram Mounts, which are also of very high quality. The mirrors are made in the USA!      FIVE BIG STARS!     Next on the list of upgrades was an IMS 4.0 Gallon Fuel Tank.  But. before installing that, I figured it was a good time to remove the airbox snorkel and the welch plug that Honda installs to block access to the fuel mixture screw.  The latter mod I had to do to my KLR650 as well. For the airbox snorkel, I used a cable tie and masking tape to hold the wiring harness out of the way of the 3/64" bit used to drill out the rivets.                                                                                                                                 Snorkel removed   Note: It is not necessary to drill all the way through the rivet.  As the pictures show, you only need to drill far enough for the head of the rivet to pop off.  I left the body of the rivets in to plug the holes.   Next up was the carburetor fuel mixture screw access.  It is blocked from the factory by a brass welch plug.  I used a 3/32" bit to drill a hole through the plug, taking my time to drill slowly and just barely break through the plug.  I then screwed a wood screw into the brass plug, and then used pliers to grab the screw and pull the welch plug out. Now that I had access to the D-shaped mixture screw, I found that my Motion-Pro D-shaped bit was too short to reach the screw when attached to my driver.  So, I used a Dremel with a cutting wheel to cut off only about 3mm of the housing to allow my bit to snap firmly onto the mixture screw.               I used a file to chamfer the sharp edges left by the cutting wheel. Now that I could adjust the mixture, I determined that it was set at about 1 1/4 turns (counter-clockwise) out, which is too lean.  I set it at 2 1/8 turns out.  Another point worth mentioning is the jetting.  My bike came from the previous owner with the Pro Circuit T4s installed.  However, he did not change the OEM jetting, so the bike ran very lean.  Before my first ride, I swapped the OEM 152 main and 50 pilot for a 160 main and 58 pilot.  That was much better, but slightly rich for our hot, humid summers.  I am leaving the jetting as is though, because cooler, drier weather is finally arriving!  Next summer, I will try a 158 main and 55 pilot.   With all of the carb work finished, I could put the carb back on the bike and start on the IMS Fuel Tank installation. Installation of the IMS tank was a breeze, with no fitment issues.  I have read comments by posters online, that they had to modify the L-Brackets to make the tank fit.  I can't say for sure, but I suspect that perhaps the instructions weren't followed to the T.  The instructions state what I learned over forty years ago when working at a Honda dealership assembling new bikes.  When installing a component with multiple attachment points, simply get all the bolts or screws started loosely.  Only after all the hardware is installed do you start to tighten everything down. The tank is OEM quality, fits perfectly and allows plenty of clearance between the petcock and the engine cylinder.   In my normal brain fog from lack of sleep, I forgot to weigh the OEM and IMS tanks for comparison.  I do however recall a detailed listing of XR650L parts weights that indicated the stock tank with shrouds weighs about nine pounds.   I estimate the IMS tank weighs about five pounds for a savings of about four pounds.   I like the new look of the BRP.  I may have to change that to BWP! I am very happy with the IMS 4.0 Gallon Fuel Tank.  Great quality and a perfect fit.  I remember IMS Products hitting the market back in 1976 with their high quality pegs, tanks and shift levers.  I'm a big fan of their stuff.  I also have their IMS Pro-Series Footpegs on my bike.   More to come.........................

xmxvet

xmxvet

 

My Best Shot

I thought it would be interesting to do a write up about getting a particular shot. Seems pretty narrow of a topic, but let me put some perspective to it so you can understand what goes into making a film ready for the screen. The video below is the result of what took place in the story that follows it: Sometimes the camera grabs the right thing I want to tell my story in a way that entertains, inspires, and just makes any person on the planet want to go out and ride a dirtbike. The story includes many of my passions. Dirt Biking, exploring, cinematography, and thrill seeking via whatever comes across my path. In my attempts to bring the story to the screen, I have taken thousands of video clips, sound bites, and photos. I have seen a progression of quality over the course of the film project. I feel a lot more capable of going out and producing something more visually pleasing than when I first started. I don’t want to spill all the beans, but on a recent film shoot, I went out with an idea to get a particular shot. I wanted a majestic “top of the world” shot that would blow minds.  I wanted it to include a motorcycle and a man. My hope was to make the shot tell a specific story. The story was to include reaching a goal, risking much to do so, and receiving an award for the hard work. That’s where I started. In prep the night before the film shoot, I gathered all the equipment needed. Drone batteries charged and firmware all updated. Extra cords and propellers in case something goes wrong. SD card formatted, ND filter kit cleaned up, fuel tank topped off, and the chain lubed. I check the tire pressures and fluids on the Honda CRF 450x. It’s my favorite steed. It always gets me there and back. Sorry for the view! An early morning rise will allow me to reach the film site when the sun is coming up. My hope is that there will be some clouds. I cannot control that, but based on the last few mornings, it looks like it should be good. My head hits the pillow as I go back through my memory bank of perfect picture places. Pachatusan is the location. It’s a huge mountain, 16000ft that sits just behind my house. There are two rock points that I have in mind. I can put my bike on these points, although it’s not an easy ride, but it’s worth the shot. Five in the morning brings first light. I get up, gear up, and head out in short order. I ride smooth and fast for 30 minutes from my house to reach the spot. Yup, it’s pretty. I get all giddy because of the way the scenery holds the colors, the silhouettes, and overwhelming views that just don’t seem real. I begin to set up the drone. My plan is to do a point of interest shot which places the camera on a center area, while the drone does a circle around the point of interest. If I set the angles just right, I capture the portion of the ride up to the rocky point. I prepare the drone for flight, start the camera, and fly it over the point of interest to set the drone flight pattern. I set the camera exposure, shooting in 4k, with a 4mph circling speed. Now it’s time to get the shot. I set the controller on the ground, hop on my bike, and get ready for the drone to pass a spot on its circle. Once it reaches the right spot, I begin to ride up the gnarly rock to reach the point. It’s scary, but I have done it before and know what I am up against. My first attempt was foiled as my impatience and hurry somehow broke my concentration as I crashed out before reaching the top. The batteries are limited and I used a bunch of the time to set up the shot. In the first case, I had to go back and replace the battery and set up the shot again because of my crash. Second times a charm. On the second attempt, I set it all up much faster. This time, I patiently do it right. I ride up the rocky point flawlessly and place my tires on the rock outcropping. It drops off hundreds of feet. I feel a queasy sensation as I look down into the canyon. It’s funny, but the thoughts of my clutch cable snapping at the moment that I roll my tire up to the edge of the cliff give me the heeby jeebies. Dirtbikes are such a mind game. I stay there for a moment, I look around in awe, then I shake my head in disbelief that I can actually exist in a place like that. I forget that I am filming because I am so blown away at what’s in front of me. Regardless, I get the shot. It’s not over. I still have to get back and edit the footage. Opening the file for the first time to watch the raw scene, is always a thrill. It’s like a kid opening a Christmas present. Just a little screenshot! Once I review the whole scene, then I put the raw footage into my editing software and clip and cut it to exactly what I want. I tweak the color if need be and add an effect or size it up to fit like I want. There is something magical when it all comes together. I know its film, but it gives me the same feeling as when I am facing an impossible hill climb. I decide to give it my best and most aggressive shot and I rip all the way to the top. Surprised and thrilled at the same moment, I scream and raise my fist in celebration to the guys down below. Yeah, that is the thrill that has pushed me to reach the end of this film project. I am hoping to have the film released for video on demand after the film festivals. There is always the chance that it might get picked up by a media buyer as well. Not sure where this thing is going to go, but I can sleep well at night knowing that I reached my goal. I finished. Make sure to stay tuned right here as I will keep you TT peeps up to speed on the film. I also will be keeping the official film page on Facebook up to date. It’s called Never Ride Alone Film. Make sure to give it a like and share the heck out of it. I am pretty sure the moto community has never seen a film project quite like this one... A solo movie experience completely created by one hard enduro guy who loves dirtbikes as much as anybody on ThumperTalk. Thanks for following along, but if you're note, tap that "follow" button up top to be notified of when I post new stories. Scottiedawg


scottiedawg

scottiedawg

Are Project Bikes Even Worth It?

Whenever purchasing a used dirt bike, no matter how well inspected, there is always an element of chance involved. The possibility of an engine failure is what worries everyone the most and is a costly disaster to deal with. For those mechanically inclined, seeking a blown up bike can be alluring because it allows the new owner a fresh start. While this may seem like an ideal situation how often does it financially make sense and how do you decide to make the purchase? At DIY Moto Fix we just picked up a 2006 Honda CRF250R “Project” over the weekend, and I want to share the financial reasoning that went into the purchase as well as discuss the critical inspections we made which led me to pull the trigger. Over the next several months we’ll see if I made a good decision! The criteria I intend on using to determine if my purchase was justified or not will depend on a couple things. First, if I sell the bike will I net more money than I have into it, or at the least, break even? Second, could I have spent an equivalent amount of money elsewhere and gotten a bike that has a freshly rebuilt engine, which to me, equates to a machine that will provide countless hours of trouble-free riding? The bike will also be the subject of several blog posts and perhaps videos. However, these uses will not be factored into the valuation of the decision. No corners will be cut throughout the rebuild, and the end result will be a robust bike that I would be proud to keep, should I choose to. That said, let’s take a look at what I picked up! The Bike I found the bike listed on Craigslist for $1000. There wasn’t much detail behind the ad, and it consisted of a couple of sentences. In summary, the ad basically said everything was there, a new crankshaft and main bearings were included as well as a new top end. A half dozen pictures were presented and the engine was neatly laid out. I contacted the seller and inquired if any engine components were missing or needed replacement. I was reassured the only things missing were the valve keepers! While it would be great to think the engine could easily be reassembled, I had my doubts. I needed to investigate in person. Preparation If you’re ever in a situation where you need to collect an engine in pieces, don’t rush and forget to come prepared. Some engine components shouldn’t get mixed around or interchanged and it’s incredibly helpful to keep the hardware separated by subsystems. Here’s a list of the storage aids I brought with: Sharpie marker Ziplock bags Boxes Plastic part bins The Real Story When I arrived, I was greeted by an avid rider who was friendly and had four seemingly well-kept bikes in his garage plus a bunch of moto-related parts, not a bad start. He showed me the 250R he was selling and I began my inspections. Inspections In most cases the engine internals aren’t accessible when looking at used bikes for sale, so as funny as it may sound, it can be really easy to get caught up in the excitement of the potential sale and forget to look at a lot of critical parts. Each major engine component that gets overlooked can be a several hundred dollar mistake and make or break the profitability of the purchase. I want to cover the engine internals I carefully inspect to estimate the cost of the rebuild. VIN Number I’m a practical person and highly recommend ensuring the VIN number is unmolested and the seller’s “sale story” remains consistent throughout the sale. Don’t bother inspecting anything else if the VIN number has been tampered with. On some bikes, such as this one, cable chafing wore through part of the VIN number. This type of wear is easily discernible from intentional tampering. Crankcases Crankcases are one of the most expensive parts on an engine to replace, so look carefully for cracks and other damage. Scrutinize bearing bores, seal bores, threaded holes, cam chain guide slots, gearbox features, and mating surfaces. In this particular case, both the left and right case halves were damaged. I’ve got a lot of work ahead of me to try and bring these back. We’ll discuss welding crankcases in an upcoming post! Crankshaft Check the crankshaft to ensure it is at the very least serviceable. Look for surface damage, worn or broken gear teeth, and pitting. I recommend always assuming the crankshaft will require a rebuild even if it feels okay. Fortunately for me, this bike came with a new Wiseco crank assembly. Bearings All the engine bearings should be checked for notchiness. Any bearings that are gritty or bind when rotated should be replaced. For this particular engine, I’m planning on replacing them all. Conrod I recommend installing a new rod in conjunction with servicing the crankshaft. However, if you’re considering using the crank assembly, inspect the rod small end and feel how the big end rotates. Look for pitting and signs of distress in the small end. Notchiness in the big end warrants further investigation. Cylinder Inspect the cylinder walls for damage. Any defects you can catch your fingernail in should be cause for concern. The cylinder that came with this engine will either be replated or replaced. Piston/Rings The condition of the piston and rings can help determine what may have led the engine to be sold in pieces, however, reusing it isn’t something I’d recommend. Get in the habit of automatically budgeting for a new piston assembly anytime you come across a project bike. Cylinder Head The cylinder head is an expensive assembly to replace. While you always want it to be okay, I’ve found that by the time the bike reaches “project” status many of the internals, including the cylinder head, are in need of major TLC. Occasionally the valve seats can provide insight, however, I prefer to look at the valves themselves. Inspect the combustion chamber, head gasket sealing surface, and threaded holes in the cylinder head. Stripped fastener holes in the cylinder head can be very challenging to fix. On this engine, the valve seats will need to be recut or replaced, at a minimum. Valves Take a look at the valve faces for signs of recession and damage. Severely worn valves will be visible to the naked eye. This is the case with my new acquisition. Camshaft Inspect the cam lobes and any associated bearings for damage. Any pitting present on the cam lobes will warrant replacement. I’ll be installing a new cam in this engine. Transmission The gearbox shafts and gears should be inspected carefully for damage. On machines that don’t shift well and pop out of gear, damage to at least two mating gears will preside. Look at the gear dogs for excessive rounding as well as the mating slot. On this 250R the gearbox is in great shape. Clutch The clutch is an easy component to inspect visually. Look for basket and hub grooving which signifies a worn out clutch. In my case, this was easy to spot. Bike Inspections I’m not going to deep dive into the bike inspections since we’ve discussed this in a previous post and put together a comprehensive guide on the subject, which you can find here. In this particular situation, based on the amount of distress the radiators displayed I have to assume they will need to be replaced. The rest of the bike was in okay shape and luckily for me, the seller had some spare plastics, spare seat, and new tank plastics, which helped sweeten the pot. Rebuild Estimate Replacement parts for different makes and models vary, but I tend to make rough estimates based on the table shown below. The table is presented in a la carte style so cost estimates can be determined depending on what components must be replaced. The next table details the components I’m expecting to replace on the Honda. In this particular case, I’m estimating I’ll have $1630 into the resurrection of the bike and engine. I bought the bike for $800, so I’ll have a total of $2430 into the machine if my estimate is correct. Keep in mind this excludes monetary consideration for my labor. Since I’m going to use the bike for multiple projects, accurately tracking my labor will be challenging. If you’re looking to turn a profit fixing project bikes though, it’s essential to have a handle on the labor associated with each project. Resale Value I did a quick search on Craigslist to see what 2004-2007 Honda CRF250R’s were going for. I found a smattering of list prices and reasoned that I could sell this bike for at least $2000. Now, going by the numbers that put me out $430, again excluding labor. Was it worth it?   As you can see from a financial standpoint this project probably wasn’t worth taking on, or was it? Apart from picking up a broken low-value machine and then completely rebuilding it, is there any other way to pick up a used bike that undergoes transformation and starts its life in your hands with a completely rebuilt engine? I highly value understanding the condition of my machines before I entrust them to carry me at high speeds past trees or over jumps so assessing the heart of the machine whenever practical is valuable to me. I also get incredible satisfaction from working in my shop and resurrecting a machine that may have otherwise been slated for the parts section of eBay. What about you? What is your take on project bikes? If you’re looking to expand your arsenal of skills when it comes to wrenching so you can take on more challenging projects, take a look at our two and four-stroke dirt bike engine building handbooks! The dirt bike engine building handbooks are nearly 300 pages apiece and share a wealth of knowledge you won’t find in your service manual when it comes time to rebuild your engine. Check them out on our website or on Amazon .   Thanks for reading and have a great week! -Paul 

Paul Olesen

Paul Olesen

KETOGENIC DIET & INTERMITTENT FASTING: DO THEY WORK? - PODCAST #23

During this Coach Robb Podcast I shed some insight into how the Ketogenic Diet (a.k.a. Keto Diet) originated and how this suggested way of eating has some immediate benefits, but also long-term consequences. I also discussed the similarities of the Keto Diet and past “popular diets and systems” that focus on one element of nutrition, take it out of context, and market that element as a brand new idea that is revolutionizing the way humans should eat to shed body fat and improve performance. As they say, everything old becomes new again, and after listening, you will see how there is a much simpler and sustainable way to eat to drop those unwanted pounds of body fat without sacrificing your foundation of health and wellness. During the second half of the podcast, I explain what intermittent fasting is and how the body adjusts and adapts to short periods of complete fasting (eating no calories at all). In addition to the pros and cons of intermittent fasting, I explain that if you implement fasting, of any duration, at the wrong time, the consequences could be quite substantial. If you have read about fasting and wondered if this process is good for you, grab a piece of paper and jot down some notes. The decision to fast has many implications beyond what it does to the body during the fast. You also need to understand the timing of the fasting process to avoid detrimental long-term results. Listeners questions include: What do I do if eating prior to exercise and/or racing makes me sick to my stomach? Why does training in the heat makes it difficult to drop body fat? How does a warm-up and cool down improve performance? What are the hierarchy of needs relevant to overall health and performance? What can I do to reduce cholesterol levels naturally?
  http://www.coachrobbpodcast.com/
 

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

Road to Loretta's - History of MotoE Amateur Race Team

Follow Coach Robb on his way to Loretta's and learn about the history associated with the most successful amateur development program in the history of motocross. Watch MotoE riders Triangle Yamaha's Logan Best ripping on the new YZ65 to a pair of seconds (including some holeshots!); Dylan Greer and Josh Guffey in the Pro-Sport classes; Curtis Biorn in the C class; Bud Guthrie in the 40+ class and Colton Eigenmann in the 250B class where he landed on the podium in the last moto and went 4th overall. Coach Robb has had the privilege of working with riders such as Ryan Dungey, Adam C, Jeremy & Alex Martin, Jordan Bailey, Isaac Teasdale, Ian Trettel, Ashley Fiolek, Broc Tickle and many more as they have developed into national amateur champions and into professional stars. If you would like more information about Coach Robb's MotoE Performance and Nutritional Programs, please visit CompleteRacingSolutions.com.  

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

How Rest Improves Your Speed & Endurance

Exercise is a great habit to have within your daily life; however, when it becomes an obsession it can actually become counter-productive to your overall health.  Excessive training (in the form of volume and/or intensity) without adequate rest causes the body to become "numb" to external indicators of over training such as mood swings, simple sugar cravings, interrupted sleep, loss of sex drive, loss of body weight, suppressed appetite and an elevated resting heart rate. Research indicates that after 12 weeks of consistent training, Cytochome C (a mitochondrial enzyme involved in the production of energy at a cellular level), reaches a peak and then beings to decline. In addition to Cytochrome C levels, so does your maximum oxygen uptake (also known as your VO2 Max.).  At this point, the body must be allowed to rest and re-group for continued progress.
Give it a rest! Training creates adaptations within the body's various systems (muscular, cardio-pulmonary, lymphatic, nervous and connective) and needs to be supported with rest and food for positive adaptations.  Inadequate amounts (and quality) of sleep and food set the body up for a physical break down which leads to negative effects on the body (i.e. suppressed immune system and muscles with less power and endurance). In addition to adaptations within the body's systems, training causes changes at a cellular level - cell mitochondria swell, metabolic wastes accumulate, essential nutrients (particularly electrolytes and stored glycogen) deplete, and muscle tissue is torn.  This tearing is known as microtrauma of the cells, and torn muscle tissue doesn't work efficiently.  As popularly noted, it takes 48 hours for the body to recover from this micro-trauma and has to be supported with rest and food for proper recovery and improved overall health. If the body doesn't get the opportunity to rebuild from the "work phase" of training, overall health and associated performance begin to slow down (and in extreme circumstances, cease all together). The concept of hard training days followed with easy-active recovery days incorporated into your weekly training schedule establishes the balance necessary for maximum improvements in your overall health and ultimately your performance.  Consistent training without physical or mental setbacks provides the foundation for your body absorb your training volumes.  The larger the foundation (i.e. quality of overall health) the quicker you will recover from workouts and the quicker your body will progress to new levels of performance. The key to overcoming your fear of taking time off is to understand how much it will help, rather than hinder, your performance.  Think about it this way, if you are not fresh, you will not have the energy (or desire) to push to the next level of performance.  If your body doesn't experience the next level, you will begin to stagnate within your performance cycles. So, the next time you see a recovery workout on your schedule, don't ignore it! Remember, that rest allows your body to recover, rebuild, and ultimately become stronger.
Have a great holiday weekend and don't forget to tap that "follow" button!

Coach Robb Beams
Human Performance Expert
 

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

MX Jumping Fundamentals w/ Garrahan Off-Road Training

In this training video, I talk about and demonstrate the fundamental riding skills & techniques necessary to effectively and safely tackle the jumps you'll encounter on the MX track. It's geared toward developing riders, so if you're scrubbing the 120' step-up triple at your local track, this video isn't for you. 🤜🤛 Brian Garrahan
Garrahan Off-Road Training
http://garrahanoffroadtraining.com/

   

The Best Cure for Jetlag

Well, here goes my latest ride…I must say it was one of my favorites. Granted, when I started I was dreading it. I was coming off a knee injury that has kept me off a bike for about three months. In addition, I was arriving from the US to Cusco (11000 ft elevation) on the day the tour started. It was a bit different than a normal tour, as the guys were from the southern part of Peru. In fact, one of the riders was training for the 2019 Dakar that will take place in Peru next January.  The fellas knew I would be arriving and had planned on me not being there for the first day.
Cusco Peru - Home Sweet Home!
I hit the ground in Cusco and started feeling the urge to ride, then decided to go for it. The 20 some odd hours of flight that led up to me gearing up and heading out was tough, but I wanted to ride so bad.
Looks like a commercial for Husqvarna 2-strokes, huh? 
  I connected with the fellas and told them I was in and would meet up as soon as I could gear up. They put me in charge of the guiding job as we were in my backyard. I knew exactly what they wanted.   We hit some legendary trails. I got in three of the finest days of hard enduro that one can imagine. I am gonna let the pictures do the talking. When it was all said and done, we had hit every type of weather from sun to snow, altitudes from 8000ft to almost 16000ft and back all in the same day, got stopped with waist deep snow just 200 yds from the top of the pass, broke a few parts on the bikes, and snapped a million pictures. It was just another reminder as to why I love this sport! Riding in this place has been a privilege. I have filled my memory bank with some of the most incredible rides, scenery, and experiences that one can imagine. Enjoy the pictures!   On Another Note… Many of you have been following along with the Never Ride Alone film documentary project that I have been working on over the past few years. I am happy to announce that the film is complete and ready to show. The next step in the process is to enter into the film festival arena before the typical video on demand or DVD sales are available. The reason for this is that most film festivals will not allow you in if you have previously distributed the film. So, just hang in there a bit longer and then it will be available for purchase through various distribution options. Also, if you have not followed the official film page on Facebook, make sure to follow at Never Ride Alone Film. There you will be kept up to speed on the happenings, release dates, and film festival showings. There might just be one in your area. Check out the trailer below to get you excited for the movie.    

scottiedawg

scottiedawg

Coach Robb: "Who is your favorite rider you have worked with and why?"

I am super excited about this new series captured by Treehouse Creative Designs (TreehouseCreativeDesigns.com)! The vision of the series is to learn more about my background, my training methods, and my perspective on the motocross industry. In this first segment, I was asked "Who is your favorite rider you have worked with and why?" If you have a question on your mind, email us at Contact@CoachRobb.com and we will incorporate it into our next video series. #MotoE

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

Coach Robb Podcast: POST-RACE DEPRESSION & HOW TO AVOID THE NEGATIVE SIDE EFFECTS OF OVER TRAINING

Podcast #21 POST-RACE DEPRESSION – HOW TO AVOID THE NEGATIVE SIDE EFFECTS OF OVER TRAINING Over the last 34 years of coaching, I have has seen countless cases of post-race depression. This is not a subject that I take lightly and in this podcast I explain why it happens, as well as providing some very important steps you can take to help offset the symptoms. **Note: if you are dealing with depression, I strongly urges you to seek professional help immediately! ** I also outline what over training is, how to identify if you are on the path to over training, along with four specific questions you must answer to keep it from happening again. Grab a piece of paper and jot down the blueprint as I walk you the necessary steps to elevate your health, wellness and performance without having any future performance setbacks. Listeners questions include: What is the difference between electrolytes and calories in a sports drink; When should I resume training after muscle soreness, Tips to keeping Energy Fuel cold during long workouts, Can you drink Energy Fuel with dinner, and the fine line between being too technical and not technical enough. If you have any questions or frustrations, please post them below and we will address them directly here on TT!   Thanks for listening. Coach Robb
CompleteRacingSolutions.com 

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

Looking to enter your first race?

Thinking of entering your first race? Have no idea what you’re doing and don’t know where to start? Great! I have learned a few things that may help you prepare and enter your first race. The first step is gathering information on what you can expect. Second step is to get a dirt bike, third step is to learn to ride it really well so you don’t embarrass yourself,….At least, that’s what your probably thinking. I urge you to ignore step three, step one is a good idea and step two is kind on non-negotiable unless you want to make a statement by showing up at the line riding a pedal bike, though I think you may end up timing out and camping in the woods for the night. I just started riding dirt bikes last year and earlier this spring I went to my first Enduro race. I will tell you that entering a race is one of the best ways to up your game in very short amount of time. You may be confused on how it’s organized, you may fall, you may get beat by 12 year olds, you will have to get over yourself. Once you have it in your mind that you would like to enter a race, you better get your body and bike race ready. There are a lot of youtube videos out there to show you some great exercises to get in shape, and riding itself is a great way to become physically prepared. If you are entering as a novice there is most likely a shortened course. The shortened course can be anywhere from 2-4 hours of riding. It’s a good idea to ride 4-5 hours each practice standing the whole time in preparation.  I don’t want to get into too much detail on the physical and mechanical prep as there is a ton of info on Thumpertalk and various videos already. Very good idea! Make sure you bring gas, tools etc in case of last minute adjustments. Do not be that guy who sits there revving his engine in the prep area a hundred times to dial in the carb. Do this at home. Next you have to figure out what race is right for you. There are many styles of racing, and I will not detail each one as there are plenty of resources out there doing just this. I will tell you to choose one close to home, because you will be sore for the drive home. It’s also a good idea to look on youtube, there are plenty of people who post their gopro footage of the race. This will give you an idea of what the terrain and course looks like.  Also check out the area for camp sites, hotels or other places if you are spending the night. I spent the night in the prep area sleeping in the back of my car. I folded down the back seat and spend the rest of the night ensuring that I found every single metal bracket in the back of the seat with my back. Once I was sure I had the brackets fairly well mapped out I was able to get some sleep. In the morning a fellow racer told me he puts down a small piece of plywood in the back of his car for just this reason. Once you get to the race location you must sign in/sign up. Bring cash! Some locations require extra money on site for various fees, entry sign ins, race monitoring devices etc. Not everywhere is covered with cell signal so bring cash in case their machines do not receive signal to accept debit/credit cards. Once you have signed in and got your transponders (in enduro) you then go to the noise check station. This would be the guy who looks like he’s checking out guy’s butts as they rev their engine. No he is not some moto perv, well actually, he may be, but he is also checking to make sure your bike isn’t too damned loud to be on the course. This person has an actual decimeter, and is not using a phone app. I have tested these phone apps and they can be way off, do not rely on them. After the noise check you then have a while to wait before the pre-start meeting. Quite a few guys do not gear fully up until after the pre-start meeting as it can be a few hours from the start of sign ins to the pre-start meeting. After the meeting where they thank sponsors and lay out the rules for the gas stops etc then they start lining up for the race. Do not line up too early and congest the start area, hold back a bit and talk to other riders to see what line they are in and adjust yourself accordingly. There are a few things to take note of when starting the race. First is what position you want to start in. The lower the number the earlier you start. An earlier start can mean better trail conditions, however it also means that more people are behind you to pass you. It was my experience that I lost most of my time from moving out of the way to let other riders pass. The later the start the less people there are to pass you, however the track may not be in a very good condition. Remember when you looked for youtube videos from previous racers? See if they commented on what row they were and look at the track conditions. I started at row 30 out of 50 and found that to be perfect. Race pace is also very important, and there are a variety of resources online that speak about this as well. Basically you do not want to go too fast you burn yourself out. When I was racing I had to move over quite a few times. If you practice your balance you will be able to ride slow on the side of the trail allowing others to pass. If you don’t have very good balance you may have to stop and put a foot down, loosing quite a bit of time. In reality the first race will be a race against yourself. This is the time where you need to figure out the process of entry and dynamics of how the race structure works. Don’t be hard on yourself if you place last, just work on learning how to race and its an accomplishment just to finish. If you can, buddy up with someone when you get there who has done a few races and get them to show you the ropes. The guys we have in the off road community are usually great and don’t mind helping out someone new. One of the most important things to remember is not to take yourself too seriously. If you are afraid to enter because you’re afraid to come last or look like you don’t know what you are doing, you’re missing out on a huge part of off road riding!

Husquire

Husquire

Dirt Adventures on Manitoulin Island - Why You Should Carry A Repair Kit

Manitoulin Island is a beautiful place to ride, unfortunately, the entire thing is privately owned, this means as dirt riders we are stuck to the roads, which means we are driving an unregistered vehicle illegally or on trails we are trespassing on private property. Riding gravel roads is a good time, some fun wide open stretches, although my almost stock CRF230F falls flat on its face at high rpm, it is still fun to push the limits on this little bike. Luckily we did find snowmobile trails that did not have any no trespassing signs posted, how can we know it's trespassing without a sign, right? Manitoulin has a lot of rocky terrain, much like what you see around Muskoka and along highway 400, just a little more flat. If you look hard enough you'll find trails consisting of flat rock and patches of sand and clumps of grass, great for faster riding. If you want the more technical stuff, it is not a hard task to find some rocky hills (although they won't be too long), all you need to do is ride in a ditch for about a kilometre and you're almost guaranteed to hit something. I would not call this a destination for off-road riders, dual-sport riders, on the other hand, would love this, dirt road after dirt road. The scenery is amazing and you will likely enjoy just cruising through the countryside and maybe finding some rougher road allowances. In our case we have bikes that are not even green plated as of our time on the island, we weren't worried about getting stopped though, whenever we saw anybody we just wave at them, not that the residents know the difference of a plated bike, but everyone seemed to respond with a friendly wave. After searching google maps' satellite view, we went to check out what looked like a trail, we end up at a "no exit" road with a fairly wide, but bumpy, trail going straight back into the woods. Following this rail fence all the way back until a fork in the trail, with a cottage and no trespassing signs on our left, we gladly took a right, the direction of a major road we were looking to get to. Being fairly new to trail riding, and having never been on the trail before we proceeded quickly but cautiously. Zipping along the packed ATV trail with hunting stands passing by on our left and the same rail fence on our right, we figured we were right on the property line of two lots. Suddenly the packed dirt turned to cracked uneven rocks, working hard not to let my tire slip into a deep crevasse, I hit a steep hill, with some pretty tall rock steps. Not to worry the one thing the 230 can do reasonably well is low-end torque, trying hard to pop up that front tire and jump the ledges. A few more hills like this and we popped out on the road that connected us to our cousin's cottage on the other side of Lake Manitou. Not only was it the road we wanted, but the snowmobile trail we were on continued alongside this road, perfect. Fearing a gas shortage we turned the other way and made our way to the closest gas station. A couple days later we decide to take that awesome trail once more and pay a visit to the other side of the lake, we made our way through the same section as before without any problems, finally, we popped out on the road and were ready to test the new section. A variety of technical, rocky and flat, open trail, it was a lot of fun. We made it there without any problems, cooled off in the lake and chilled there for a few hours. Ready to make the trek back, we fire up the bikes as I turn my bike around I feel it break traction, didn't think much of it cause I was on the grass making a sharp pivot. Every turn I made after that I could feel my tire slipping. Finally, I recognized my tire was flat, we stopped and looked at it but we couldn't do much considering we had no tools or anything to fix this. The only option was to ride home on it, going slow as not to destroy my tire (although it is toast but I'm too cheap to replace it) and save my rim. Instead of 25 minutes, it took closer to an hour and 15 minutes.  This is where it comes to mind that maybe an Emergency/Repair Kit wouldn't be such a bad idea, not only can we avoid unnecessarily long trips in the future but changing a tire on the side of the road might even be a fun experience/story to tell. We quickly hopped on Fortnine (formerly the Canadian Motorcycle Co.) and started adding things to the cart, referencing the Fortnine youtube channel and Frickin Jim as well, both of whose opinions we trust. Our Kit now consists of: 1  80/100/21 STI Heavy Duty Tube  1  100/100/18 STI Heavy Duty Tube 1  Stop and Go, Patch Kit 3 Tire spoons we already owned 1 handheld air pump we already owned 1 Adventure Medical Kits Ultralight Watertight Kit 0.3 And we didn't have a small bag or a small container so, for the time being, we threw a litre of conventional oil in there, which will probably be reduced to 500mls or less. Tubes obviously as a backup, patch kit was cheap and is extra insurance. Spoons to actually make a tube change possible, pump to pump it up although it will take a while. Med Kit in case of an emergency on the trail, and Oil for topping up the bike if need be, or lubing a chain, or some cables, possibilities are endless. watch part of this Manitoulin Dirt Biking Adventure Below  

seatbounce MX Jumping: How to Seat Bounce with Garrahan Off-Road Training

The seat bounce is a fundamental MX jumping technique and in this video I cover how to seat bounce, when, and why. Are you using the seat bounce? How's your technique? Struggling with anything? Hit me up in the comments section below! I'm here to help you improve your riding skills so you can be a more effective racer or simply have more fun & ride more safely. Oh, if you want to be notified when I post new content to this blog, be sure to tap that "follow" button. Brian Garrahan
Garrahan Off-Road Training
http://garrahanoffroadtraining.com/
 

I CAN SEE THE CHECKERED FLAG

Thumpertalk member Mark McMillan sporting a cool new jersey Congrats to Mark McMillan on the cool new Motomission Peru jersey! Mark submitted his opinion on our latest Never Ride Alone film contest and he was picked as the winner. Thanks to all of those that sent in their opinions and votes for the official movie poster. Here is the poster with the most votes! THE WINNING POSTER The Never Ride Alone film is moving forward toward the finish line. I am excited as ever to finally see this thing on a big screen. The final touches are being completed and this thing should be ready to hit the film festival circuit. Make sure to stay connected via the official Never Ride Alone film page on Facebook. Also, I will continue to post information and distribution dates on this blog as it comes available. Below is a self interview about the film. My hope is that you can gain a bit of insight into whats to come on the screen. Hope you enjoy. Also, make sure to watch the official trailer if you want to see what the film might be like. THE OFFICIAL NEVER RIDE ALONE FILM TRAILER   What motivated me to make this movie? Originally, the idea was to take a group of guys( and dear friends)  that raced in the 2007 Baja 1000 and do a ten year reunion ride from the Amazon Jungle, from one side of the Andes to the other, and reach the beach of the Pacific Ocean on the western coast of Peru. For various reasons, that project had to be postponed. The current Never Ride Alone project is actually the backup project that was mostly filmed during the time that was set aside for the original project. I love making film. It started back when I was in grade school decades ago. I had a media class where we experimented with video equipment and I just got hooked. I also love to tell stories. What better way to match up my passions for film, storytelling, exploring, and dirtbike riding?   A COMMON BACKDROP IN THE ANDES OF PERU How long have you been working on this project? It began with an idea about three years ago. From there, the dream never stopped. It sure brought out the naysayers. When you dream big, it draws negativity like a magnet. I had to decide if I wanted to listen to it or make my dream a reality. I am still up to my neck in this thing. ANOTHER PERFECT TRAIL   What have you learned along the process of making the film? Most of all, I learned about Scott Englund. It was like a gym. Each day I would work out to make myself stronger, faster, and better. Not just in physical strength, but in mental endurance, technical riding ability, filmmaking, and problem solving.  When you watch the film, there is a profound theme that follows a "never give up" attitude that one must have to reach a goal. There have been hundreds of valid reasons to give up. The value of finishing the project is more than throwing in the towel. Why is Peru the stage for the film? I live here. I ride these mountains daily. I know what a treasure and privilege it is to do what I do. I am like a kid that just received the coolest present for Christmas and has nobody with whom to share. Of the hundreds of thousands of hard core dirtbikers in the world, only a fraction ever have the opportunity to ride in these mountains. I love showing off my back yard to other riders. I am hoping that you come and ride with me some day. It's perfectly beautiful. Don't get me wrong, there are other beautiful places in the world, but this is as exotic as it gets. Millions of acres to myself. Its hard to wrap your mind around, but literally millions of acres without another dirtbike out there. They don't make rules to keep dirtbikes out. They would have to make the law just for me.  The trails are endless. I have hundreds of routes that I have yet to tackle. No way in my lifetime will be able to explore each one. There are hundreds of trails that have never seen the tires of a dirtbike.  When you put the landscape and the mystique of the Andes together with trails that  dirtbikers can only dream about, you get a perfect stage for a film. What's the theme of the movie? The perfect movie stage It's a solo project. I chose to build a film without the help of a crew to see if it was possible. I carried all the equipment in my pockets and backpack, I set up each shot, rode through many of them,  and edited and developed the story along the way. My goal was to create a visually pleasing film that would trick the viewer into thinking that there was a crew that helped in the process, but it was just me(with the exception of a few parts outside of my riding story). It's a dirtbiking film. The riding is real... no stunt people, no special effects, just me and my bike. However the story is universal. It's about choosing and challenging oneself with an impossible journey, preparing to tackle it, and then stacking up a bunch of obstacles on top of the impossible just to push myself even further. My goal is to show an ordinary dude in a real life dirtbike story facing eminent failure, but giving 100% anyways.  If I can motivate one person to think differently and go a bit further without giving up, then the film was a success. I also wanted to create a film that makes you want to ride. I am pretty sure this will do it. MY TRAINING GROUND When will the film be ready for purchase by the general public? I am currently finishing up the final editing touches in order to be ready to enter a number of film festivals. Generally, films become available for distribution at the end of the festival circuit.  There are a number of variables in the mix. If it is well received by the festival world, then the distribution will have a much wider spread. That is my hope.   Make sure to follow along by liking the Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/neverridealonemovie/   Big things to come, Scottiedawg Scott Englund and his family run a high end dirtbike adventure operation in Cusco, Peru called MotoMission Peru. They operate the business as a social enterprise and donate 100% of the profits from the business to support local social projects in the Cusco area. Check it out at www.MotoMissionperu.com. .

MotoE - Fueling for Performance Bundle Now Available!

Frustrated with trying to figure out what or when to eat and drink during your athletic training and racing? Cramping? Bonking? Feeling tired all the time? Whether you’re a national champion or weekend warrior, this workshop is designed for every type of racer. MotoE founder, Coach Robb applies his 34 years of experience as a nutrition and performance coach to provide proven solutions to the most common nutrition and hydration frustrations. You will walk away with: ▶ Customized nutritional & hydration strategy for improved strength to weight ratios, speed & endurance ▶ Proven process for determining what you need to eat & drink (and how often) during training and racing ▶ Clear understanding of what foods aid in muscle recovery and support your adrenal and immune systems Order Here - CLICK HERE Get a sneak peek of the presentation here:      

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

5 Key Steps to Training & Racing Well in Heat & Humidity (Pod Cast)

During this Podcast (#18), I outline How to Train and Race in Hot and Humid Conditions for Optimum Performance.  I walk you through 5 key steps to take prior to, during and following training and/or racing to ensure that you perform well in these difficult situations, along with how to correctly recover in the shortest amount of time.  During the first segment, I also outline how to identify and offset a heat stroke. During segment #2, I  address the Role of Carbohydrates, Protein and Fat as it Relates to Performance.  This includes how each of these plays a significant role in your energy levels, performance levels, and your ability to recover.  You might be surprised to learn what it takes to become both lean and strong! Finally, I answers listener’s questions about eating enough to off-set weight gain associated with stress; how to lose fat and not muscle; why eggs are important in a meal plan; and why do I train faster than I race? If you have any questions that you would like me and/or my staff to research and discuss, please don’t hesitate to drop me an email to: Contact@CoachRobb.com Regards, Coach Robb
 

C'mon Dad!

Over the course of my time operating MotoMission Peru, I have had various opportunities to host/guide dirt bike adventures with other riders. I have a special place in my heart for father/son adventures. I guess it must have something to do with the sentiment I have with my dad.   Official MotoMission Tour Video...Check the others on our Youtube Channel   Dirtbikes and Dads go together When Tony and Joran contacted me about doing a tour, my excitement level rose. A father/son combo with limited dirt bike experience would be a challenge, but a welcome one. I normally cater to seasoned riders, but his one would put a different pressure on me as the guide. I needed to push these guys to their limits, while completing a route within our time frame of four days. The terrain needed to fit both the skill level and the distance we needed to cover each day. The fellas wanted to roll their tires over some amazing parts of Peru, get some mind blowing pics,  and live to tell about it. A face with a smile tells a story My work was cut out for me. I put Joran on a crf 230 because of his size and experience. Dad, Tony, was on the Husky 300, I rode a Honda 450x. I figured I could swap out with one of them if I needed. Bike selection worked out perfectly. The route itself was ideal. It was a mix of single track, some rough two track, and some free ride(go where ever you want) type of stuff. It was perfect to try a hand at hill climbs, scare oneself silly on rock fixtures, and put the tires on the edge of mountain ledges to make the heart flutter a bit. The ride was fantastic. Tony and Joran both expanded their riding level to new heights. In fact, I was able to coach the guys on various little riding tricks that someone showed me along my journey.  Stand up more, focus eyes on where you want to go,  as well as some mechanics of body positioning and how it relates to traction and control. It was a bit of a seminar/riding school/test day. No doubt that the guys are better riders now. I thoroughly enjoyed that part of the tour.

The view they wanted to see!
  When it all boils down, we had a fantastic four days of riding. Each were pushed to the limit various times each day. When the heads hit the pillows each night, it took no time for the sleep to begin.  Smiles were abundant, and there were no shortages of whoops, hollars, and high fives.

Certainly another successful tour!   MotoMission Peru is a social enterprise operated by Scott Englund. If you want to see the Andes via dirtbike, this is how to do it. High quality in every aspect. Service, guide, routes, equipment, and overall experience cannot be beat. Contact Scott via Thumpertalk messaging or at scott@motomissionperu.com for more information.

5 Food Buzz Words That Make You Think You're Eating Healthy (but you're not!)

What looks like a healthy choice on the outside (and marketed accordingly) isn't always what it's wrapped up to be on the inside. Here's 5 food marketing buzz words that sound oh so good until you peel back the covers for a better look: Made with real fruit Reality: there are no regulations around this claim, according to Joy Dubost, PhD (spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics).  She provides a simple example.  Consider Kellogg's Nutri-Grain Cereal Bars Mixed Berry.  Sounds like a relatively healthy snack.  But the "made-with-real-fruit" filling contains puree concentrate (made with sugar) of blueberries, strawberries, apples and raspberries. Solution: the lower a fruit is listed in the ingredient panel, the less the product contains.  If you want to reap the benefits (vitamins, minerals, anti-oxidants, water, electrolytes) of eating fruit, consume a piece of in season fruit every time you sit down to snack and/or have a meal.  Lightly Sweetened Reality: Unlike “sugar-free” and “no added sugars”, this claim isn’t regulated by the FDA.  It is easy to be fooled.  A simple example is Wheaties Fuel, a cereal that is marketed specifically to athletes and carries the lightly sweetened label; however, it contains more sugar per ¾ cup serving than the same amount of Froot Loops. Solution: again, read the nutritional panels.  Avoid products that have sugar within the first five ingredients (Note: also look for words ending in –ose (sucralose, fructose), these are all sugars and should be avoided because they are synthetic sugars).  Gluten Free Reality: To make this claim, a product must be made without wheat, barley or rye.  But there have been reports of cross-contamination with gluten-containing grains during growing or manufacturing says Pamela Cureton, RD at the Center for Celiac Research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Solution: look for a seal from the Gluten-Free Certification Organization, the Celiac Sprue Association or the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness which test products to ensure they have not gluten.  Added Fiber Reality: though products with this claim do actually pack additional fiber – often listed as polydextrose, inulin (derived from chicory root), or maltodextrin – it’s unknown whether consuming them has the same benefits, such as lowering cholesterol, as the fiber found naturally in whole foods.  Solution: it is okay to consume added fiber (often found in cereal, yogurt and energy bars), but too much can cause a derailing bellyache.  Strive to consume 14 grams per 1,000 calories as a general rule of thumb. Wild Rice Reality: “True wild rice comes from a plant that’s indigenous to certain lakes and rivers in the Midwest and Canada,” says Peter David, wildlife biologist at the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission in Wisconsin.  “Most people eat the kind produced out of California, which may be treated with chemicals. Solution: look for the plant name Zizania palustris on the ingredient panel.  It packs four times the amount of protein, 73 times the potassium, and 12 times the fiber per serving as its impostor. Learning what to look for in your food for optimum health, wellness and ultimately performance…another piece to help you Work Smart, Not Hard!
Yours in sport & health, -Coach Robb, Coaches and Staff CompleteRacingSolutions.com

 

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

Taking Care of Business

Hello ThumperTalk readers! Been a while, I’m going to go ahead and bring you up to speed on where I’ve been and where I am headed. After numerous crashes and a bit of luck I managed to gain my Road To Supercross points by making the main events at both the Greensboro and Florence Pro Arenacross races in both the AX and AX Lites classes, as well as top 5 finishes in the 250A class at the Tampa and Atlanta Amateur Supercross rounds, winning the Atlanta round. I have to say that my experience with Arenacross was a bit different than the first time I had jumped into it. While I really only had about a week’s worth of prep in total for my Arenacross races, I at least had a good idea of what the entire day is like and what to expect as far as the track goes, the racing, and the strategy. I definitely was able to be more deliberate about my actions on the track and that allowed me to advance into the main events. Whether it was knowing the spot to get aggressive in an LCQ, or knowing that the two guys in front of me were going to take each other out and where it was going to happen in order to set myself up to pass both of them when they hit. Moral of the story for Arenacross racing, was that I had to be calculated and smart to achieve the outcome that I wanted consistently. Loretta Lynn's Regional Championship at WW Ranch, photo by Maine Event Photography (MEPMX) Since getting my Road to Supercross points, the focus has been going through the process of  qualifying for Loretta’s… which is something I am way too familiar with at this point! Both of my area qualifiers had something interesting in store for me. For my Southeast region, I had the chance to race against Tony Archer! It was definitely a cool experience, even though I managed to screw up my lead on the last lap by overshooting the inside line with my front tire by just enough to go down and then not being able to catch back up. Definitely learned a bit about being confident in my speed and staying forward-focused to keep me in front of someone that has a lot of experience and a lot of speed. It’s definitely different having someone behind you that is very well-versed with racing at the highest level and has the ability to read someone and their next choices like a book, compared to most amateurs (myself included) that still have a bit of that gusto to just try to use brute force or drag racing someone to the inside line. My Mideast qualifier… well that was a bit muddy to say the least, starting the weekend with a backhoe pulling us into a spot to pit. Having less than an hour of ride time on my 350, as well as about 20-30 minutes of ride time on my Twisted Development 250 created a little bit of uncertainty, but also excitement in the race! I’ll have a review on the performance of my Twisted Development motor up soon. 2018 Loretta Lynn's Regional Championship at Redbud MX, photo by Diffysmooth Then came the regionals. Feeling like I had a point to prove a point, along with the next level of confidence of being on some very competitive equipment… it didn’t exactly mesh well for me for the conditions of the track. While there was some back luck I could not control in terms of other riders and a freak cross-rut on one of the faster jumps, I was in the positions to qualify, but my problem was that I did not want to settle and could not put my bravado of believing in myself aside to just do what needed to be done. When Redbud came around, however, the mindset had changed. While it rained every single day and at some points it would’ve been better to have a jet ski on the track… I relied on my knowledge of putting myself in a good position and being more mindful of my ability and what the track conditions allowed me to do. Until it was all set and done, I had finished 11-2-2 for 4th overall in Open Pro Sport and 5-3-11 in 250A for 5th overall, both positions that get tickets to the big show! Definitely not going to talk about both of my 11th place finishes… let’s just say it was the kick in the rear I needed to get a set of acorns and not be intimidated by the mud (which also came from a talk from mom). 2018 Loretta Lynn's Regional Championship at WW Ranch, photo by David Lando From there, it’s on to Loretta’s! From Loretta’s, we’ll see how things shape up. Until next time, keep the dirt churned up. I’ll see you out there. Thanks for reading! Huge thanks to everyone who sticks behind me. Husqvarna, Xtreme Powersports, Race Tech, MPR Suspension, Boyesen, Fly, X Brand, RoostMX, Acerbis, Dunlop, Twisted Development, Twin Air, Mika Metals, Wiseco, EVS, Tamer Holeshot Hookup
 

What Do You Love and Hate about Today's Machines?

Today I want to shift gears, open the floor for discussion, and talk about the state of dirt biking as it relates to the bikes we buy, ride, and maintain. In my relatively short existence, a number of things have happened in the industry which has been interesting to see. A few examples, which are not by any means exhaustive of all that has gone on, include the emergence of the four-stroke power plant, electronic fuel injection, improved tire technology, electric bikes, and the development of air forks. On a more micro-level we’ve seen improvements to materials, new manufacturing processes, and coating processes which have allowed ever increasing performance. As a fellow rider and someone who has no bias or stake when it comes to manufacturers and product offerings, I’d like to hear your thoughts as they relate to today’s machines. My question to you is a simple one, are your needs as a consumer being met by today’s manufacturers and bikes?  What aspects of today’s machines do you love and what are pain points for you?  If you could do things your way, what would you change? Are there machine variants that aren’t being offered?  Leave a comment below that addresses these questions or share your historical perspective! I look forward to your responses. Thanks and have a great week!

- Paul
https://www.diymotofix.com/ 
 

Don't Ride Naked

Want one of these cool jerseys? We need your help picking out the best film poster. My last post highlighted a moto documentary film that will be coming out soon. Its called Never Ride Alone. Make sure to follow the official Facebook movie page at Never Ride Alone Film https://www.facebook.com/neverridealonemovie/ to stay up to speed on the release dates and film festival showings.#neverridealonefilm s   As I am in the final stages of putting the finishing touches on the film project. I find myself in a spot where I need some help. So, I thought I would find some good old Thumpertalk advice. Instead of asking for opinions on which is the best oil, guaranteed to bring a thousand opinions,  I thought I would ask opinions on movie poster options. What better way to prod you for a response than to make it a contest. Here goes. I have an official MotoMission Peru jersey to give away to one of the TT members that cast their vote for the movie poster. All of the votes will be taken into account, a list will be made of each person that provides a vote, and one of the names will be randomly drawn. The winner gets a sweet jersey out of the deal, just like the one in the picture above.
  Option 1, 2 or 3...Pick your favorite and message me for a chance to win an official MotoMission jersey
  The Official Never Ride Alone Film Trailer I am not sure if you caught my last post, but I shared the official movie trailer with the TT community. Here it is again in case you missed it. It should get you excited for the film. The film is about exploring the Andes mountains of Peru on a dirtbike, and its filmed, directed, and produced by a dirtbiker.  I will let the trailer do the rest of the teasing. As for the film, many have asked about release dates. The film should be finished during the summer of 2018. It will be released in the film festival scene first. From there, it can take a few different paths, but it will be available for purchase after the film festival circuit is complete. Again, make sure to follow the official Facebook movie page at Never Ride Alone Film to stay tuned to festival schedule and showings near you. I am looking forward to tallying up your votes. Also, stay on the lookout for a sweet movie coming soon. Until the next one, Scottiedawg   Scott Englund is the owner/operator of MotoMission Peru, a social enterprise hard enduro operation nestled in the Andes Mountains of Cusco, Peru. Check out our website at www.motomissionperu.com or find us on Facebook at MotoMission Peru.  Feel free to follow along this blog for ride adventures in exotic places, with amazing people, and with some incredible experiences along the way. www.motomissionperu.com
https://www.facebook.com/neverridealonemovie/
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