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  • Paul Olesen

    What Spare Parts Do You Bring To The Track or Trail?

    By Paul Olesen

    With warmer weather and the riding season around the corner for many of us, I wanted to cover a topic that can either make or break an event. Whether you’re competing in a racing series or traveling to the track or trail, let's talk about event preparedness. More specifically, what spare parts should you keep on hand? Plus, what methods do you use to keep your spares organized?

    Honestly, I struggled with organization until I started working on this post. I had no method to my madness. Every time an event came up I’d do the same thing; throw a bunch of stuff in a box or the back of my van and head to the event. The sad part is I now realize this was a weakness of mine for quite some time, but didn’t do anything about it! Maybe you can relate?

    I finally said enough is enough. I don’t throw my tools in a cardboard box when I go to a race, leaving what I bring to the fate of my memory. So why would I do that with the spare parts I bring?

    I started solving this problem by compiling a spreadsheet detailing what spare parts I keep on hand for ice racing and hare scrambles. I realize that each discipline will differ and may have niche parts that should be kept. The goal here is not to definitively define what spares one should keep on hand, but to have a conversation and provide a resource that can be used to help people get set up based on their own needs.

    Once I took inventory of everything I felt I wanted to bring to a race, I went to Menards and went hunting for the perfect organized storage bin/toolbox. Here’s what I ended up with:



    Naturally, once I returned with the toolbox, my list grew and I probably need to go back for a bigger one. I intend to store a copy of the spreadsheet in the tote so I can keep tabs on inventory and know exactly what I have available.

    Should I get another bike, this system is easily replicable and my plan is to get another organized toolbox that goes with it.

    This system is how I went from being an unorganized “throw it in the van at the last minute” rider to a more relaxed well prepared rider. I’d love to hear how you handle event readiness, what you bring, and how you keep track of it. My hope is that by sharing our strategies we’ll save someone the misfortune of having a bad day at the track or trail. Perhaps I'll even end up with more things I need to add to my list.

    -Paul

    If enjoyed this post be sure to follow my blog and sign up for my newsletter!
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    • 16 comments
    • 1,177 views
  • Scott Meshey 141

    The Evergood Open Experience

    By Scott Meshey 141

    Hello ThumperTalk readers! I have to say that of all the things I write about, I enjoy writing about going to races that are put on by great companies to recognize the unrecognized talent. Recently, I made the trip to such a race in Iowa, called the Evergood Open at Oak Ridge MX, and I’m here to tell you about it. I will admit, I have a certain level of bias when it comes to races like the Evergood Open or the MX Reunion races, because it was through the Vurb Classic in 2012 at Echeconnee that I was recognized for my never-quit pursuit of a W against some stiff competition. Through the help I received from Race Tech because of the recognition and my performances at other Vurb Classic events and amateur nationals, I’ve brought myself to where I am now, and that’s not something I take lightly. Being brutally honest, the top level of support in the motocross industry is a tight nit group and it is hard to break into without solid results. These events give those who truly need the help the opportunity to get the help they need to make their journey to the top a possibility. Hats off to the companies who participate in these events that are giving deserving riders the opportunity to succeed, because that’s truly what you’re doing. 2013 Vurb Classic @ MX207 The staff at Evergood Co truly put on a great event that I will not soon forget. Not only did some great riders get recognized, but the event was held at possibly the coolest track I’ve ever been on. Also, the event was just plain fun! It wasn’t super high stakes, and instead was laid back and all about everyone having a good time. Everything from the track, to the people, environment, and activities after racing made the event feel like the drive was paid back in spades. Evergood Open @ Oak Ridge MX, photo by Jordan Hoover at Evergood Co Whether we realize it or not, if you’re a racer who competes for money or the goal of making a career of it, we get so sucked into the winning mindset that we forget that there’s more fun in motocross (or whatever you race) than just winning. One thing that I found super fun about the Evergood Open was the holeshot competition! It was intense… and I was genuinely concerned when I saw a 1200cc BMW flat-track bike pull up. However, I did end up winning on the 250f! If winning it wasn’t cool enough, interviews and popping a champagne bottle is icing on the cake to top off a good day of racing on a great track! I also think it’s great for the spectators, being able to see more than just racing, and it creates a great atmosphere for everyone. I mean, who doesn’t love watching people bang bars off a start for $100 all while playing some AC/DC? Evergood Open @ Oak Ridge MX, photo by Jordan Hoover at Evergood Co Another great thing about the Evergood Open was being able to meet different people, including those that we look up to. Over the weekend I got to meet Jeff Emig and Jason Anderson… not during a schedule; just walk up and started talking. Being able to chat a bit to people you look up to and get their perspectives and simply listen to what they have to say about a track is priceless. Being able to talk to Emig one-on-one about his ideology towards racing and explaining why he maneuvers the track like he does creates a new perspective that can be utilized if implemented correctly into your own personal riding style. Evergood Open @ Oak Ridge MX, photo by Jordan Hoover at Evergood Co Overall, great time at a great track that will have me coming back next year! Hats off to the whole Evergood Co crew, as well as everyone at Oak Ridge MX, y’all killed it!   Be sure to stay tuned to the blog series and click/tap the “follow” button to stay updated on any new entries! You can also click the “follow” button on my profile to stay updated with anything I post on ThumperTalk. Thanks for following along, I’ll see you at the races!
    • 2 comments
    • 1,432 views
  • Paul Olesen

    Three Easy Ways to Improve Engine Cooling

    By Paul Olesen

    This month I want to discuss three easy ways to improve engine cooling for your dirt bike or ATV and explain why they are effective. As improvements are made to an engine that increase its power, the amount of heat the engine will create will also increase. Effectively removing heat from the engine and cooling it is very important as the power output of the engine goes up. The cooler an engine runs, the more power it can produce. There are three ways that the aftermarket attempts to improve the cooling system of a particular engine. 1. Increase flow through the cooling system. 2. Increase the cooling capacity of the radiators. 3. Increase the pressure of the cooling system. Let's dive in. 1. Increase flow through the cooling system
    The flow through the cooling system can be increased by installing a water pump impeller designed to increase the flow rate of the coolant. The reason increasing the flow rate of coolant works is because the rate of heat transfer from the engine to the cooling system is directly proportional to the mass flow rate of coolant. This is thermodynamics jargon, but there are two key parts to consider. First, how much coolant is flowing, and second, at what speed the coolant is flowing. The more coolant that flows and the faster it flows will reduce the temperature difference between the point where the coolant enters into the engine and where it exits. This next part is not quite as intuitive. When the temperature difference between the inlet and outlet is reduced, the average coolant temperature is lowered. When the average coolant temperature is lowered the engine will run cooler. This is why fitting a water pump, which increases the flow of coolant through the engine, improves cooling. 2. Increase the cooling capacity of the radiators
    Radiators consist of a series of tubes and fins which run from the top to the bottom of the radiator. These are often referred to as the radiator’s cores. As coolant enters the radiator it moves through the series of tubes and heat is transferred from the coolant to the fins. Air passes over the fins and heat is transferred from the fins to the air. This transfer of heat from coolant to air is how radiators reduce the temperature of the coolant. Coolant temperatures can be reduced by upgrading radiators in three ways, by increasing the frontal area of the radiators, by making the radiators thicker, or by using materials with better heat transfer properties for the cores. For all practical purposes, increasing the radiators’ frontal area and improving the core materials is rarely a viable option for dirt bike applications. This is because there is little room for the radiators to begin with and they are susceptible to damage, making the use of expensive core materials a risky affair. Unfortunately, both of these options are better improvements to make before resorting to increasing the thickness of the radiators. Increasing the thickness of a radiator is not as efficient of an improvement as increasing the frontal area of the radiator. In order for thicker radiators to cool more effectively than their stock counterparts, airflow past the radiators is key. When the thickness of a radiator is increased, air must travel a greater distance through the radiator before exiting. The speed the air is traveling plays a big role in determining how quickly the air heats up as it moves through the radiator. If the air is not traveling fast enough through the radiator, the air temperature will rise and equal the coolant temperature before reaching the end of the radiator. Once this happens, heat transfer stops and whatever portion of the radiator remains will not help with cooling. In order for a thicker radiator to be effective, air must flow quickly enough through it so that the exiting air temperature is at, or better yet, below the coolant temperature. In conclusion, benefits from adding thicker radiators will be more prominent in applications where speeds are relatively high. Whereas in applications where the bike is hardly moving, improved cooling may not be noticeable. 3. Increase the pressure of the cooling system
    The last alteration to the cooling system that can be made is to install a high pressure radiator cap. As coolant temperature increases, pressure increases inside the cooling system. The radiator cap is designed to be the pressure release point in the cooling system in the event that too much pressure builds up. This can occur as a result of overheating or a blown head gasket for example. By designing the radiator cap to be the weak link in the system, other parts of the system, such as seals, don’t end up getting damaged from being over pressurized. The radiator cap features a plug and spring on its underside. The spring is designed to compress once a certain pressure is reached, at which point the plug will move upwards and uncover a pressure release hole where excess pressure will be vented.



    The coolant’s boiling point and ability to conduct heat are necessary factors in understanding why a high pressure radiator cap can help improve engine cooling. Water alone boils at 212°F (100°C) while a 50/50 mix of water and antifreeze boils at 223°F (106.1C). Radiator cap pressure designations are usually advertised in bar, with most stock radiator caps designed to withstand pressures up to 1.1 bar (16psi). The more pressure a fluid is under, the more difficult it becomes for the fluid to vaporize, and the higher its boiling point becomes. When water is under 1.1 bar of pressure, the temperature water will boil at is 260°F (127°C) while a 50/50 antifreeze mix will boil at 271°F (133°C). By installing a radiator cap designed to withstand higher pressures, an additional increase in the coolant’s boiling point will be seen. High pressure caps are usually designed to withstand 1.3 bar (19psi) of pressure. This 0.2 bar (3psi) increase in pressure over the stock system will increase the boiling point of water or antifreeze by 8.7°F (4.83°C). This will then bring the boiling point of pure water or a 50/50 antifreeze mix to approximately 269°F (132°C) and 280°F (138°C) respectively. While this small temperature increase alone won’t do a lot for your engine, coupling a high pressure cap and using coolants with better heat transfer properties can do wonders. Antifreeze (ethylene glycol) alone is not an inherently good conductor of heat. In fact, pure antifreeze conducts heat about half as well as water, while a 50/50 mix of antifreeze and water conducts heat approximately three quarters as efficiently as pure water. This means a cooling system using a 50/50 mix of antifreeze would have to flow faster than a cooling system filled with pure distilled water in order to achieve the same cooling efficiency. What this means for you is significant cooling gains can be made by using distilled water and an additive called “Water Wetter” in place of an antifreeze-water mix. Water Wetter is an additive that improves water’s “wetting” abilities (another whole subject), adds corrosion resistance, and slightly increases the boiling point of water. A high pressure radiator cap in conjunction with distilled water and Water Wetter as the coolant is by far the best route to go for high performance applications where freezing is not an issue. For applications which must still be resistant to freezing, the antifreeze-water ratio can be altered in favor of mixtures incorporating more water than antifreeze so that the cooling efficiency of the mixture is improved. Just bear in mind the freezing point of the mixture as it is thinned with water will be reduced, so you will need to pay close attention to the environment you are operating in so that the coolant is never susceptible to freezing. A frozen coolant system can ruin an engine and makes for a very bad day! I hope you enjoyed this post on three easy ways to improve your engine’s cooling.  One more thing before I wrap up! April is Autism Awareness month, and here at DIY Moto Fix we couldn't be more excited to announce that we will be donating 15% of all profits made in April to AutismMX. If you haven't heard of AutismMX, this amazing non-profit brings Autism awareness to the motorcross community. Founder, Matthew Dalton, created this non-profit after finding that motorcross was an amazing way to connect with his autistic son. At DIY Moto Fix this non-profit also touches a chord with us. Our filmmaker and photographer, Kelsey Jorissen, loved dirt biking with her autistic brother throughout their childhood. The Autism MX Project focuses on four areas: Autism MX Day Camps are days for ASD kids and families to have the chance to ride AMX’s little dirt bikes and quads and enjoy the sport of motocross. Team Autism MX Sponsoring amateur MX racers, riders as well as sponsoring AMA pro racers. Through doing so, they are getting out the word on Autism Awareness to millions. AMX Puzzle Piece Apparel from shirts, graphics, goggles, to help stand out and support Autism Awareness. AMX Ride Days for Autism Awareness AMX celebrates Autism Awareness and is a fundraiser for The Autism MX Project. So for the entire month of April - if you buy a book, a video, even a poster - 15% of that purchase will go towards AutismMX and their amazing cause. Thanks for reading and have a great rest of your week!
    • 12 comments
    • 2,944 views
  • Coach Robb

    Natural Alternatives to Performance Enhancing Drugs

    By Coach Robb

    It has been a few years now since Lance Armstrong appeared on TV and admitted to his, and his teams, use of performance enhancing drugs (PEDS).  To say that there was an awareness of PEDS influencing the race results of the Tour de France is an understatement; however, to the extent that past racers and champions have admitted to using PEDS (both regarding the type and amounts) is frightening.  In this article, I thought I would provide a recap of the most popular PEDS and how you can get the same performance results in a healthy and natural way.  Note: Your body produces these substances naturally in the body, the key to optimum health and performance is to maintain a high quality & quantity of healthy blood through clean eating and controlled training efforts (volume, intensity and frequency). Drug: Erythropoietin (pronounced, ah-rith-ro-poy-tin, and abbreviated, EPO) What EPO Does Within the Body Erythropoietin (pronounced, ah-rith-ro-poy-tin, and abbreviated, EPO) is a relatively recent entry into the deceitful pursuit of glory. EPO is a protein hormone produced by the kidney. After being released into the blood stream it binds with receptors in the bone marrow, where it stimulates the production of red blood cells (erythrocytes). Medically, EPO is used to treat certain forms of anemia (e.g., due to chronic kidney failure). Logically, since EPO accelerates erythrocyte production it also increases oxygen carrying capacity. Side Effects of EPO: Death In the 1990s, there was a spate of sudden deaths associated within the cycling world associated with EPO: Marco Ceriani (16 years old), Johan Sermon (21 YO), Fabrice Salanson (23 YO), Marco Rusconi (24 YO), Jose Maria Jimenez (32), Denis Zanette (32 YO), Marco Pantani (34 YO), Michel Zanoli (35 YO).  This negative publicity was at least part of the reason for the clamping down on EPO use, which was rampant at the time.  The reason that EPO, and transfusion blood doping, is dangerous is because of increased blood viscosity. Basically, whole blood consists of red blood cells and plasma (water, proteins, etc.). The percentage of whole blood that is occupied by the red blood cells is referred to as, the hematocrit. A low hematocrit means dilute (thin) blood, and a high hematocrit mean concentrated (thick) blood. Above a certain hematocrit level whole blood can sludge and clog capillaries. If this happens in the brain it results in a stroke. In the heart, a heart attack. Unfortunately, this has happened to several elite athletes who have used EPO. EPO use is especially dangerous to athletes who exercise over prolonged periods. A well-conditioned endurance athlete is more dehydration resistant than a sedentary individual. The body accomplishes this by several methods, but one key component is to “hold on” to more water at rest. Circulating whole blood is one location in which this occurs and, thus, can function as a water reservoir. During demanding exercise, as fluid losses mount, water is shifted out of the blood stream (hematocrit rises). If one is already starting with an artificially elevated hematocrit then you can begin to see the problem -- it is a short trip to the critical “sludge zone”.

    Additional dangers of EPO include sudden death during sleep, which has killed approximately 18 pro cyclists in the past fifteen years, and the development of antibodies directed against EPO. In this later circumstance, the individual develops anemia as a result of the body’s reaction against repeated EPO injections. There are some other reasons why cyclists might be predisposed to sudden death - riding at high intensities when carrying viral infections (as pro athletes tend to do) is one of them. And, as Ryan Shay, and a number of other high-profile cases have shown recently, sudden death is a tragic, but not completely uncommon event. There are reports that Nolf’s cardiogram was normal, but even that are not a guarantee of health, because those tests can often miss the quite rare conditions that cause sudden death in athletes. Source: click here How to improve the quality & production of red blood cells naturally With a balanced diet of fresh fruits, vegetables and lean protein sources, your body will produce the blood chemistry necessary to perform at an elite level.  Determining the optimal amount of protein, carbohydrates and fats that an individual need for optimal health and performance is beyond the scope of this article; however, I want you to know how to create healthy red blood cells.  Natural Eating Solution: eat high quality protein along with high quality brown bread with real butter.  The protein will provide your body with iron (helps form hemoglobin which carries oxygen in the bloodstream from the lungs to the muscles & brain) and the brown bread will provide you B vitamins (also referred to as Energy Vitamins).  An additional benefit of eating protein and brown bread is that the bread with improve your absorption of the iron.  Drug: Human Growth Hormone (hGH) What HGH Does Within the Body hGH is stored in a pea sized ball called the pituitary gland and is the primary stimulus to muscle & muscle strength, bone growth & bone strength, tendon growth & tendon strength, injury repair and mobilization of body fat for use as energy.    Warning: this gets technical, but necessary to fully understand this process.  The key to overall health and performance is to stimulate your own production of growth hormone and you accomplish this by stimulating the pituitary gland correctly.  The pituitary is stimulated to release growth hormone by another hormone circulation in the brain called somatocrinin.  Levels of somatocrinin can be increased by increasing levels of brain neurotransmitters.  These neurotransmitters are the chemicals that carry information from one nerve to another.  Their activity constitutes your mind, your consciousness and dreams.  To increase neurotransmitters, you have to get the amino acids that influence them past what is called the blood-brain barrier.  This concept is beyond the scope of this article, but what needs to be discussed here is an amino acid, Tryptophan, which is a precursor of the neurotransmitter serotonin.  Serotonin is a compound that slows down brain activity during rest & sleep.  Shortly after you fall asleep, your pituitary gland releases a burst of growth hormone.   Source: Optimum Sports Nutrition, Dr. Michael Colgan. Side Effects of Synthetic hGH External side effects of synthetic hGH include: intense wrist nerve pain, diabetes, overgrowth of the facial bones, gaps between the teeth as the jawbone widens, development of a fatter nose, thickened bone above the eyes resembling an ape and excessive hair growth.  Internal side effects include stressed liver, thyroid & pancreas symptoms, diabetes and historically die prior to the age of 60.  How to improve the production of hGH naturally As mentioned above, the largest growth homone release occurs 30-60 minutes after falling asleep along with high intensity exercise (within moderate volume levels).  To take advantage of these normal physiological functions, racers need to increase the duration and quality of sleep and monitor exercise durations and intensity levels.  Ideally, racers should train twice daily, mid morning and early afternoon and take a nap immediately after training.  Remember, each time you rest, your body receives a burst of growth hormone naturally.  Natural Eating Solution: consume a high-quality smoothie that contains a high quality whey protein prior to sleeping and napping.  Research has shown that the production of hGH can improve by up to 300% when high quality whey protein is consumed before resting.  Drug: Testosterone What Testosterone Does Within the Body Testosterone has two distinct modes of action, androgenic (masculinizing) and anabolic (tissue building).  Up to a certain level of testosterone in your body, a level that varies widely with biochemical individuality, the androgenic action produces more maleness, broader features, more hair, deeper voice, and larger sex organs.  Along with it, the anabolic action produces larger muscles and greater strength. 

    Side Effects of Synthetic or Excessive Testosterone If you take synthetic or excessive testosterone, the androgenic action turns nasty (aggression, violent anxiety, paranoia, and manic-depressive reactions).  Additional negative side effects are irreversible baldness, overgrowth of the prostate, (which chokes the bladder and requires a catheter in order to urinate), acne (the blood fails to contain the excess hormone and overloads the sebaceous glands), impotence, shrinkage of testicles, cardiovascular disease and cancer.  How to improve the production of testosterone naturally Sleep 8-10 hours; eat high quality fruits, vegetables and high-quality protein.  Control your exercise intensity & volume to avoid over stressing your body.  Natural Eating Solution: eat foods that are high in boron, zinc, vitamin C, branched chain amino acids and maximize the release of growth hormone.    If you have any questions, comments, or suggestion for a future article, hit me up on the comments section below. I enjoy hearing from you. Oh, and don't forget to tap that "Follow" button so that you're notified when I post new tips on reaching your highest potential. Coach Robb Beams
    Complete Racing Solutions
             
    • 2 comments
    • 2,748 views
  • scottiedawg

    The Eighth Wonder

    By scottiedawg

    "While at Machu Picchu, one of the seven wonders of the world, Ryan was counting down the days for our dirtbike tour." Todd explained just moments before heading out on the trail.
    It's hard to look down upon the Andes as you fly into the Cusco valley, and not have your mind blown with the enormity and vastness of the terrain below the wings. If you are crazy passionate about dirtbikes, it's even more mind blowing to imagine riding it on two wheels. Todd and Ryan joined up with Scott Englund of MotoMission Peru for a custom three day hard enduro ride. The ride catered to their skill levels, journeyed across the type of terrain that the boys wanted to ride, and filled their minds with hundreds of unforgettable images of Peru. Each teetered on the edge of comfort as Scott managed to push them beyond their norms of riding in Colorado. The official tour video...Check it out!   Toothbrush anyone? "There is something special about leading a father son duo into the back country." Englund said as he explained how his own father bred a bit of adventure in his own heart. "I get people from every corner of the planet. They are all awesome peeps, but to share this experience with Todd and Ryan, that's a thrill."

    Three days of exotic dirtbiking. Beginning at Englund's home, the trail begins just minutes from the garage. "No trailers, you'll see what I am talking about. You won't even have time to warm up before we hit the trail." Englund explained.

    What goes on inside of Motomission is nothing short of a dream. Scott has been running MotoMission Peru for a number of years. He is a social entrepreneur who gives 100% of the profits of the business to charity. His family is supported by a number of people and/or businesses who believe in his mission. Sponsors have supported MotoMission with equipment and gear. The marketing arm of the business are happy customers that tell others about the experience and share the included tour video via social media.

    Scott does what he loves to do. Riding dirtbikes, exploring new areas, cinematography, adventure, travel, serving others, business...It all fits his lifestyle. You can see it in his smile when he hands over the bike to you at the beginning of the tour. So many views! "I've got the coolest gig on the planet!" Englund states. "In my wildest of thoughts, I couldn't have dreamt up a better situation. I live here with my amazing family, all who ride, and I get to do what I love to do, while giving it all away."

    It's not all happy and easy.  "It really sucks when you have to haul a bike out of a canyon in backpacks."  recalled Englund of a time when a customer launched a bike off a ledge so steep and deep he couldn't see where the bike had landed. Good times with Dad! Todd and Ryan got the full package. Englund was able to lead the men into an unforgettable riding experience like they had never imagined. Beyond tired, they had to make it to the next town for the night. They rode a section that is typically a two day ride, all in the scope of one day and a little bit of night. "My hand is so tired I can't squeeze the clutch anymore."  Ryan said as the cramping in his forearm curled up his hand.

    When it comes to an exotic dirt bike adventure, MotoMission Peru has the holeshot.  With countless untouched routes, an epic landscape, and a personable and capable guide, you owe it to yourself to check out this little gem in the Andes. You can reach Scott at Scott@motomissionperu.com to find out more about tours and riding in the Andes. He is always ready to talk shop! Also, don't forget to "FOLLOW" this blog if you want to have access to MotoMission Peru's new posts and videos. 
    • 1 comment
    • 2,557 views

Our community blogs

  1. Hello ThumperTalk readers! Been a while, I’m going to go ahead and bring you up to speed on where I’ve been and where I am headed.

    After numerous crashes and a bit of luck I managed to gain my Road To Supercross points by making the main events at both the Greensboro and Florence Pro Arenacross races in both the AX and AX Lites classes, as well as top 5 finishes in the 250A class at the Tampa and Atlanta Amateur Supercross rounds, winning the Atlanta round. I have to say that my experience with Arenacross was a bit different than the first time I had jumped into it. While I really only had about a week’s worth of prep in total for my Arenacross races, I at least had a good idea of what the entire day is like and what to expect as far as the track goes, the racing, and the strategy. I definitely was able to be more deliberate about my actions on the track and that allowed me to advance into the main events. Whether it was knowing the spot to get aggressive in an LCQ, or knowing that the two guys in front of me were going to take each other out and where it was going to happen in order to set myself up to pass both of them when they hit. Moral of the story for Arenacross racing, was that I had to be calculated and smart to achieve the outcome that I wanted consistently.

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    Loretta Lynn's Regional Championship at WW Ranch, photo by Maine Event Photography (MEPMX)

    Since getting my Road to Supercross points, the focus has been going through the process of  qualifying for Loretta’s… which is something I am way too familiar with at this point! Both of my area qualifiers had something interesting in store for me. For my Southeast region, I had the chance to race against Tony Archer! It was definitely a cool experience, even though I managed to screw up my lead on the last lap by overshooting the inside line with my front tire by just enough to go down and then not being able to catch back up. Definitely learned a bit about being confident in my speed and staying forward-focused to keep me in front of someone that has a lot of experience and a lot of speed. It’s definitely different having someone behind you that is very well-versed with racing at the highest level and has the ability to read someone and their next choices like a book, compared to most amateurs (myself included) that still have a bit of that gusto to just try to use brute force or drag racing someone to the inside line. My Mideast qualifier… well that was a bit muddy to say the least, starting the weekend with a backhoe pulling us into a spot to pit. Having less than an hour of ride time on my 350, as well as about 20-30 minutes of ride time on my Twisted Development 250 created a little bit of uncertainty, but also excitement in the race! I’ll have a review on the performance of my Twisted Development motor up soon.

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    2018 Loretta Lynn's Regional Championship at Redbud MX, photo by Diffysmooth

    Then came the regionals. Feeling like I had a point to prove a point, along with the next level of confidence of being on some very competitive equipment… it didn’t exactly mesh well for me for the conditions of the track. While there was some back luck I could not control in terms of other riders and a freak cross-rut on one of the faster jumps, I was in the positions to qualify, but my problem was that I did not want to settle and could not put my bravado of believing in myself aside to just do what needed to be done. When Redbud came around, however, the mindset had changed. While it rained every single day and at some points it would’ve been better to have a jet ski on the track… I relied on my knowledge of putting myself in a good position and being more mindful of my ability and what the track conditions allowed me to do. Until it was all set and done, I had finished 11-2-2 for 4th overall in Open Pro Sport and 5-3-11 in 250A for 5th overall, both positions that get tickets to the big show! Definitely not going to talk about both of my 11th place finishes… let’s just say it was the kick in the rear I needed to get a set of acorns and not be intimidated by the mud (which also came from a talk from mom).

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    2018 Loretta Lynn's Regional Championship at WW Ranch, photo by David Lando

    From there, it’s on to Loretta’s! From Loretta’s, we’ll see how things shape up. Until next time, keep the dirt churned up. I’ll see you out there. Thanks for reading!

    Huge thanks to everyone who sticks behind me. Husqvarna, Xtreme Powersports, Race Tech, MPR Suspension, Boyesen, Fly, X Brand, RoostMX, Acerbis, Dunlop, Twisted Development, Twin Air, Mika Metals, Wiseco, EVS, Tamer Holeshot Hookup

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  2. 5b0e9287e75ae_whatdoyouloveandhateabouttodaysmachines.png.fd3a4a04bbe50174e7a53a22bda788f9.png

    Today I want to shift gears, open the floor for discussion, and talk about the state of dirt biking as it relates to the bikes we buy, ride, and maintain. In my relatively short existence, a number of things have happened in the industry which has been interesting to see. A few examples, which are not by any means exhaustive of all that has gone on, include the emergence of the four-stroke power plant, electronic fuel injection, improved tire technology, electric bikes, and the development of air forks. On a more micro-level we’ve seen improvements to materials, new manufacturing processes, and coating processes which have allowed ever increasing performance.

    As a fellow rider and someone who has no bias or stake when it comes to manufacturers and product offerings, I’d like to hear your thoughts as they relate to today’s machines.

    • My question to you is a simple one, are your needs as a consumer being met by today’s manufacturers and bikes? 
    • What aspects of today’s machines do you love and what are pain points for you? 
    • If you could do things your way, what would you change?
    • Are there machine variants that aren’t being offered? 

    Leave a comment below that addresses these questions or share your historical perspective! I look forward to your responses.

    Thanks and have a great week!

    - Paul
    https://www.diymotofix.com/ 

  3. Want one of these cool jerseys? We need your help picking out the best film poster.

    My last post highlighted a moto documentary film that will be coming out soon. Its called Never Ride Alone. Make sure to follow the official Facebook movie page at Never Ride Alone Film https://www.facebook.com/neverridealonemovie/ to stay up to speed on the release dates and film festival showings.#neverridealonefilm

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    As I am in the final stages of putting the finishing touches on the film project. I find myself in a spot where I need some help. So, I thought I would find some good old Thumpertalk advice. Instead of asking for opinions on which is the best oil, guaranteed to bring a thousand opinions,  I thought I would ask opinions on movie poster options. What better way to prod you for a response than to make it a contest.

    Here goes. I have an official MotoMission Peru jersey to give away to one of the TT members that cast their vote for the movie poster. All of the votes will be taken into account, a list will be made of each person that provides a vote, and one of the names will be randomly drawn. The winner gets a sweet jersey out of the deal, just like the one in the picture above.
     

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    Option 1, 2 or 3...Pick your favorite and message me for a chance to win an official MotoMission jersey
     

    The Official Never Ride Alone Film Trailer

    I am not sure if you caught my last post, but I shared the official movie trailer with the TT community. Here it is again in case you missed it. It should get you excited for the film. The film is about exploring the Andes mountains of Peru on a dirtbike, and its filmed, directed, and produced by a dirtbiker.  I will let the trailer do the rest of the teasing.

    As for the film, many have asked about release dates. The film should be finished during the summer of 2018. It will be released in the film festival scene first. From there, it can take a few different paths, but it will be available for purchase after the film festival circuit is complete. Again, make sure to follow the official Facebook movie page at Never Ride Alone Film to stay tuned to festival schedule and showings near you.

    I am looking forward to tallying up your votes. Also, stay on the lookout for a sweet movie coming soon.

    Until the next one,

    Scottiedawg

     

    Scott Englund is the owner/operator of MotoMission Peru, a social enterprise hard enduro operation nestled in the Andes Mountains of Cusco, Peru. Check out our website at www.motomissionperu.com or find us on Facebook at MotoMission Peru.  Feel free to follow along this blog for ride adventures in exotic places, with amazing people, and with some incredible experiences along the way.

    www.motomissionperu.com
    https://www.facebook.com/neverridealonemovie/

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    Do you struggle with building a nutrition and training program that doesn’t leave you exhausted and flat on race day?

    During Podcast #13, Coach Robb walks you through the four stages necessary for optimum strength, speed and endurance specific to anything endurance (triathlon, running, mountain biking, road cycling, adventure racing, long distance open water swimming, hiking and climbing, off road motorcycle racing (2 plus hours like BAJA & GNCC).

    Before listening to this podcast, make sure you have a pen and paper to take some notes.  Coach Robb outlines the three main components associated with performance then walks you through four stages associated with building the perfect endurance program: Creating an Athlete Performance Profile, Creating an Athlete’s Foundation for Performance, Performance Evaluation and Performance Development.  After listening to this podcast, you will have the ultimate template for optimized endurance specific performance.

    And as the people’s podcast, Coach Robb answers listeners questions about the benefits of massage, how to control intensity for weight loss and cycling, how to recover from a snowboarding session, benefits of energy gels and blocks during a half marathon and when to review biofeedback indicators.

    Click the play button below to to listen to the podcast. If you want to be notified of future podcasts & blog entries, be sure to tap the "Follow" button right here on ThumperTalk.

  5. Had a great day of riding Saturday with my buddy @Bryan Bosch in the Withlacoochee National Forrest just north of Dade City, Fl. It's still pretty wet from the summer rains and Hurricane Irma didn't help! But, like always, the 701 took everything in stride, even with worn Continental TKC80 tires. Well, "almost" everything...

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    Unfortunately, the trail riding portion of the day got cut short because of a little mishap that resulted in my clutch perch letting go of the handlebars...

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    As we left the sandy trails, turning onto a damp, hard-packed clay road, just a tiny little goose of the throttle caused the bike to walk sideways into an unrecoverable low-speed drop...

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    Since the fall seemed so minor, I was surprised to see that the pinch bolt for the clutch perch had pulled out the threads! Uhhhhh, this is the "Enduro" model, not the wimpy SM version or even more girly-man KTM 690 Enduro R! IT'S a HUSKY!!!!! ;)

    Fortunately my riding partner is a zip tie junkie, so we patched things up enough to get 'er home.

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    When I got it home, I noticed that the threads went quite a bit deeper than the factory installed bolt was taking advantage of, so I was able to thread it back together using a longer bolt. Clearly this is a bit of a weak spot on the big girl, so I'll be installing REAL hand guards shortly.

    What hand guards do you guys like? Hit me up in the comments section below and don't be afraid to share your pictures. I'd love your help in picking out a pair of hand guards. Time to replace the stock wannbe  "bug guards" er, huh... "hand guards". 
     

    Bryan Bosch
    Steve Claus
    #dualsportduo

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    Moto the big girls? Thought about it!!!! ;) - Dade City MX park on the way home. At least the KTM comes with full wrap around hand guards.

  6. Tired of your ride and want to try something new? Bike too big or too small and think you need a size adjustment? Here are a few pointers on how to trade what you have now for that perfect bike you’ve been dreaming of at little to no cost! If you are thinking of swapping dirt bikes there are a few strategies that you must be familiar with to be successful.  

    The first strategy and the hardest part of trading off road motorcycles is getting one in the first place if you do not already have one. Riders do like to swap bikes, however it is uncommon that they want to trade it for something other than another dirt bike. The only people who are usually looking to get out of the sport are those that either have been injured or those who have a new family and no longer have the time to ride. In either case both those types of people are usually looking to maximize their profits to help out with their respective causes. If you do not already have a bike I found that there are two main items people usually swap one for. The first are ATV’s. People who have dirt bikes tend to be hooked to off road riding, though some find dirt bikes too hard to too risky. These are the types of people that want to swap for an ATV. It’s been my experience that most people prefer 4X4 ATV’s instead of the race ATV. I find this I mostly due to again race ATVs being too fast and higher risk. Also some people prefer them because you can have a passenger and is cheaper to ride 2 up on an ATV then have 2 bikes. If you don’t have an ATV to trade the second most popular trade item sought are boats. The most popular boats accepted as trades seem to be bow riders. After contacting a few of these people, it seems that they no longer have the time for both their fishing and biking past times and they chose fishing as their primary activity. Lastly if you have neither an ATV nor boat to trade you can try household items such as riding lawn mowers, snow blowers, hunting equipment etc. I was able to secure a 1984 Honda CR 125 by trading some camping equipment I had just sitting in my basement. I did have to drive over 6 hours but seeing as how I was looking for trades for a few months at that point I jumped at the chance.

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    The second strategy of trading is if you have a two stroke then trade it for a four stroke or vice versa. We all know the two vs four stroke debate. Some people just prefer to ride the one style vs another. This is your opportunity to profit by finding someone who just rode their buddy’s horse from a different pasture and trading with them. Nobody likes to lose out in a deal but you can turn that feeling of joy they felt in riding the other style bike into value in your bike. What I mean is people will trade their newer bikes for ones a few years older simply because they feel that style is better for them. This may take some convincing by reminding them how great that snappy responsive two stroke is vs their heavy slow four stroke, or how much smoother and more neighbor friendly your four stroke is vs their two stroke. The main point here is find out why are coveting their neighbor’s goods and play on that. Most of the time people are willing to sacrifice to trade for your bike that’s a few model years older to get what they want.

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    The third way to trade up bikes is to trade one in perfect running condition for one that is not. The purpose for this would be to trade from an older model of either stroke to a newer one. For this you will need some mechanical prowess and a few dollars depending on what needs to be done. I wouldn’t really recommend trading a fully functional bike for a nonfunctioning one unless the nonfunctioning one is significantly newer. One of the main points here is that the newer bike should have a greater value when running then your old bike plus the amount of money you’re going to sink into the new one to get it running. This is how I was able to get from my 1984 Honda CR125 to a 2005 Yamaha 250F. The owner could not start it and just wanted a bike that ran. As it turns out all the bike needed was a valve shim (At this point in my riding career I was just starting to work on bikes and made a fatal error in placing the new shim causing a catastrophic failure but none the less the bike was able to start and run. Had I done the work correctly I would have been well ahead but more on this in a later blog) Beware of people who claim it just needs a carb clean, as this is almost never the reason it’s not running. Be prepared to replace the whole valve train.

    Another way of trading and the fourth on this list is trading from a motocross style bike to a trail riding model or vice versa. Often times a racer will want to give up on the motocross scene and get into the relaxed world of trail riding. This may be your opportunity to trade your slightly older comfortable Cadillac cruising trail bike for their newer high revving beast. On the contrary others may opt to want to get into the fast paced world of mx racing and give up their newer modded trail riding pony for your motocross bike. I personally traded my 2005 Yamaha 250F for a 2004 Yamaha WR250F for the reasons stated above. The race bike was all I could trade for at the time, but it gave me leverage to get into the WR. A fellow in my town build a new mx track so I was able to capitalize on someone trading in their trail bike to get onto the track. Most people are wary to get a bike that has been raced, but if you’ve taken care of it, have a log of the work that’s been done and can show receipts of work you will have a much easier time. I tend to trust racers who know their bikes inside and out more than I do the backyard trail riders who have never checked their shims or cleaned their oil screen. There are however some racers who bag the crap out of their bikes then dump them, and trail riders who meticulously care for their princesses so you have to ask the questions. What have you done, when and how many hours.

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    Lastly the fifth method of trading is for power. There are plenty of people out there who bite off more than they can chew and are looking to trade their 450 four stroke or 250 two stroke for the next smaller size down. This also works in reverse for people who have outgrown their bikes and are looking to trade up. Many times they are willing to sacrifice a couple of model years to achieve this, or go from a more expensive brand to a less expensive brand to get what they want.

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    Some other points when it comes to trading are to be patient. Frequent all of the different online used sites. Some people include a willingness to trade in their ad, others don’t, I would ask everyone who has an online ad regardless on if they say they will trade or not as often times they have just never thought of it. Never trust anyone at their word on what the bike needs to be repaired unless it’s backed up by a repair shops written opinion. Be willing to travel and check your neighboring town’s ads as well. Its rare, but you may also benefit by trading your bike for something not necessarily what you wanted, but something that is more trade-able or more desirable then what you have as a mid-step to trade for what you want.

    Do you have a good trade story? Share it in the comments below!

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  7. In this training video I cover cornering line selection on the motocross track and the advantages & disadvantages of each.  As always, if you have any questions, hit me up in the comments section below. I look forward to hearing from you.


    Brian Garrahan
    Garrahan Off-Road Training
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    Sure, it's fun to put some laps in on a motocross track. But, you'll fall short of your potential if you're not using this key practice law of practicing important techniques separately. This is true for motocross cornering skills as well as motocross jumping skills. Did you know that riding really well requires mastering as many as 55 separate techniques, all laced seamlessly together? Find them all in the popular Motocross Practice Manual! blog-0894440001474291336.thumb.jpg.a96590e7f91f982e1fcf1eab446c083c.jpg

     

     

    If you'd like more of my riding tips, browse my blog here on ThumperTalk or my website. If you'd like to be notified when I post new riding tips, subscribe by clicking the "follow" button (upper right). :thumbsup: