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  • Coach Robb

    4 Rest Day Tips That Fast Riders Follow

    By Coach Robb

    Between riders riding and racing every weekend, a frequent question is how to recover properly.  If you have followed me for any period of time, you know that I am an advocate for one day of rest per week and to pull back the overall volume and intensity every six weeks to allow your body to rejuvenate both mentally and physically (at a blood chemistry level). What does that look like? 1. Rest Means Rest: this is not the day to go to a theme park,run errands that have you outside and in the heat and humidity, etc. Anything that is stressful on your body should be avoided. Note doing a sport specific event “easy” is not the idea of a rest day. Instead schedule a massage, read a book, go to a movie or go to lunch with an old friend. 2. Take a Nap: when your body gets into REM (rapid eye movement) level 3, it releases hGH (human growth hormone) which make you both lean and facilitates recovery. Make the room dark and cold, eat a quality snack and consume 5-8 ounces of cold water prior to lying down. 3. Contrast Therapy: the goal here is to expose the muscle tissue to the largest temperature deviation that you can tolerate; the bigger the temperature spread between hot and cold the better. If you complete in the shower, strive for 2 minutes hot – 30 seconds cold. If you utilize a bath, strive for 4 minutes hot, 1 minute cold). Repeat 2 to 4 times. 4. Loosen your muscles up: go for a therapeutic massage or take a yoga class the night prior to your rest day. Spend 20 minutes both in the morning and the evening foam rolling and working on trigger points. Gotta' slow down sometimes to go fast!
    If you have any questions, comments, or suggestion for a future article, hit me up on the comments section below. I enjoy hearing from you. Oh, and don't forget to tap that "Follow" button so that you're notified when I post new tips on reaching your highest potential. Coach Robb Beams
    Complete Racing Solutions About Coach Robb  
    • 2 comments
    • 882 views
  • Coach Robb

    4 Reason (and solutions) Why Your Training is Making You Fat and Slow!

    By Coach Robb

    Mistake #1: Not knowing YOUR sport specific heart rate training zone Your maximum heart rate number changes specific to the sport that you are training and racing.  For example, your maximum heart rate on the motorcycle will be higher than on a bicycle (because of the amount of muscle you are using).  A frequent mistake athletes make is completing a maximum heart rate assessment within one discipline and then use the established heart rate training zones across all forms of training and racing.  An additional mistake is using the generic algorithms that are programed into heart rate monitors.  When you plug in your age, height, body weight and activity level, the watch is programmed to provide you GENERIC heart rate zones.  The most accurate assessment of your maximum heart rate is to complete field testing every 6 – 8 weeks. Solution #1: Complete Sport Specific Time Trials and Determine Your Maximum Heart Rate [Note: your maximum heart rate varies from sport to sport – the more muscle you utilize, the higher your heart rate] Your maximum heart rate changes as your aerobic engine improves.  The stronger your aerobic base, the lower your resting heart rate.  With this being said, your maximum heart rate will come down as well because the heart can pump the necessary amounts of oxygenated blood to the working muscles at a lower number because it is “stronger” and pumps more volume of blood with each beat.  Over the duration of my career, I have found the following field tests as a solid indicator of maximum heart rate along with muscular endurance: Swimming: 500 yards (capture your interval at each 100 yard interval) Cycling: 10 miles (capture your elapsed time and heart rate at the five mile and ten mile mark) Running: 3 miles (capture your elapsed time and heart rate at each mile marker) For physical strength, I have a customized Plyometric routine that I feel tests your lactate tolerance and anaerobic thresholds.  This test is EXTREMELY difficult and requires a doctor’s approval.  If you have your doctor’s approval and would like a copy of this Plyometric Assessment, please email me directly.   Mistake #2: Not Testing and Evaluating Your Training Efforts Correctly When you complete your maximum heart rate assessments through time trials, you want to make sure that you are not fatiguing the muscles too quickly which keep you from accurately testing the strength of your heart (specifically oxygen volume as it fuels your working muscles with oxygenated blood). Keep in mind that there is a difference between muscular endurance and muscular power.  If you muscles fatigue due to excessive load or exertion, you will not push your heart into its upper limits.  The key is knowing how to evaluate your time trial results.  Below mistake number three, I will outline testing protocols along with how to evaluate them correctly.  Solution #2: Allow for an Adequate Warm Up When you are attempting to test your aerobic engine, you need to make sure that you don’t increase your intensity too quickly for two reasons. First: the muscles need adequate time to warm up (usually 20-30 minutes) so that you don’t use the first half of your assessment as your “warm up”.  Second: trying to hit maximum effort too early.  The idea is to see what your maximum is over the entire duration, not the first five minutes.    Mistake #3: Following a Generic Training Plan Following a generic training plan that doesn’t take into consideration your training background, physical abilities and availability of time to train will lead to performance plateaus, illness and injuries. Within our performance programs, we factor in your testing results, physical limiters (see Mistake #2), goals and objectives as we develop your training program.  Too frequently I interview new clients who are frustrated with their last year of training and racing because they don’t see any improvements despite the consistency in their training.  The reason for this is that the efforts are not being quantified and the athlete spends too much time in the “grey zone” that yields little to no improvements in performance.  Solution #3: Begin Following a Scientifically Backed Training Program If you would like to begin maximizing your training efforts, please email me and let’s get a nutrition & performance program built for you ASAP!  I guarantee that you will burn body fat, build muscle and improve both your speed and endurance in as little as 12 weeks.  Stop the insanity of training without a plan and email me today.   Mistake #4: Not Eating Enough Fat, Protein and Raw Fruits & Vegetables Many athletes become fat and protein phobic because of the misinformation that is floating around on the internet and morning shows.  The truth of the matter is that the body needs more protein and fat than you can even begin to imagine. Simply put, lean protein re-builds torn down muscle.  If you want to build more muscle you have to eat protein.  Lean protein also supports your immune system which helps protect you against viruses and being down and out being sick. Clean fat will help your body recover from the oxidative stress of aerobic exercise (at all intensity levels).  Eating raw fruits and vegetables will provide your body with the necessary vitamins and minerals to both produce energy as well as recover from your daily training.   Solution #4: Begin Eating More Protein, Fat and Raw Vegetables & Fruits to Burn Body Fat and Improve Your Speed & Endurance The only two things that satisfy appetite is fat and protein – NOTHING ELSE.  If you are on a low fat, low protein diet, you will never experience the true feeling of being full.  This will negatively affect your ability to sleep (which makes you gain weight because your body doesn’t have the chance to release human growth hormone (hGH) which is responsible for making you lean).  The key to burning fat and building muscle is to satisfy your appetite so that you can sleep deeply (REM patter three).  When you get to REM pattern three your body rejuvenates from the inside out and allows your body to release human growth hormone naturally – you will wake up both refreshed and leaner.  However, it starts with real, raw fruits, vegetables, high quality fats and lean protein. You can now see that by training with a scientific, yet simplistic approach will yield the long-term results that you have been always wanting.  I look forward to hearing from each of you and how me and my staff can help you and your program. Until next time, Train Smart-Not Hard! -Coach Robb   About Coach Robb and MotoE (CompleteRacingSolutions.com)  Coach Robb has been working with riders and racers since 1987 and is the founder of the Complete Racing Solutions Performance System, the Mental Blueprint of Success, the MotoE Amateur Development Program, the MotoE Educational Series and a nutritional consultant to Nutritionally Green Supplements based out of Orlando Florida. CompleteRacingSolutions.com is a premium resource center for motocross, supercross and GNCC riders of all abilities and ages.  Visit CompleteRacingSolutions.com & subscribe to his monthly newsletter that outlines the training solutions used by Factory KTM/Red Bull Ryan Dungey, Geico Honda's Jeremy Martin, Factory KTM/Red Bulll Alix Martin, Factory Kawasaki/Pro-Circuit Adam Cianciarulo, multi-time Loretta Lynn & Mini O Amateur Champion Jordan Bailey (Factory Rockstar/Husqvarna), Factory KTM/Red Bull Broc Tickle, Factory Kawasaki/Pro-Circuit Stilez Robertson, off road riders Charlie Mullins (Factory KTM/Red Bull), Chris Bach and Ryan Overton along with quad racer Roman Brown (Factory Yamaha) along with thousands of riders all around the world who have families, hold full time jobs and just love to ride and race motorcycles.   Instructional videos with Coach Robb can be found on the Coach Robb’s YouTube Channel addressing rider’s questions about speed, endurance, strength, nutrition, biomechanics, stretching, and soft tissue maintenance. You can also find articles and videos at CompleteRacingSolutions.com relevant to riders of all abilities.  If you are into social media, you can find him on Twitter: @MotoCoachRobb, Instagram: CoachRobbBeams and Facebook: Coach Robb.  If you are into podcasts, CLICK HERE for his first three shows where he outlined: How to Eat Healthy on $10 a Day; Importance of Sleep and It's Influence on Weight Loss; The Dangers of Over-Hydrating.    
    • 1 comment
    • 3,070 views
  • Scott Meshey 141

    The Evergood Open Experience

    By Scott Meshey 141

    Hello ThumperTalk readers! I have to say that of all the things I write about, I enjoy writing about going to races that are put on by great companies to recognize the unrecognized talent. Recently, I made the trip to such a race in Iowa, called the Evergood Open at Oak Ridge MX, and I’m here to tell you about it. I will admit, I have a certain level of bias when it comes to races like the Evergood Open or the MX Reunion races, because it was through the Vurb Classic in 2012 at Echeconnee that I was recognized for my never-quit pursuit of a W against some stiff competition. Through the help I received from Race Tech because of the recognition and my performances at other Vurb Classic events and amateur nationals, I’ve brought myself to where I am now, and that’s not something I take lightly. Being brutally honest, the top level of support in the motocross industry is a tight nit group and it is hard to break into without solid results. These events give those who truly need the help the opportunity to get the help they need to make their journey to the top a possibility. Hats off to the companies who participate in these events that are giving deserving riders the opportunity to succeed, because that’s truly what you’re doing. 2013 Vurb Classic @ MX207 The staff at Evergood Co truly put on a great event that I will not soon forget. Not only did some great riders get recognized, but the event was held at possibly the coolest track I’ve ever been on. Also, the event was just plain fun! It wasn’t super high stakes, and instead was laid back and all about everyone having a good time. Everything from the track, to the people, environment, and activities after racing made the event feel like the drive was paid back in spades. Evergood Open @ Oak Ridge MX, photo by Jordan Hoover at Evergood Co Whether we realize it or not, if you’re a racer who competes for money or the goal of making a career of it, we get so sucked into the winning mindset that we forget that there’s more fun in motocross (or whatever you race) than just winning. One thing that I found super fun about the Evergood Open was the holeshot competition! It was intense… and I was genuinely concerned when I saw a 1200cc BMW flat-track bike pull up. However, I did end up winning on the 250f! If winning it wasn’t cool enough, interviews and popping a champagne bottle is icing on the cake to top off a good day of racing on a great track! I also think it’s great for the spectators, being able to see more than just racing, and it creates a great atmosphere for everyone. I mean, who doesn’t love watching people bang bars off a start for $100 all while playing some AC/DC? Evergood Open @ Oak Ridge MX, photo by Jordan Hoover at Evergood Co Another great thing about the Evergood Open was being able to meet different people, including those that we look up to. Over the weekend I got to meet Jeff Emig and Jason Anderson… not during a schedule; just walk up and started talking. Being able to chat a bit to people you look up to and get their perspectives and simply listen to what they have to say about a track is priceless. Being able to talk to Emig one-on-one about his ideology towards racing and explaining why he maneuvers the track like he does creates a new perspective that can be utilized if implemented correctly into your own personal riding style. Evergood Open @ Oak Ridge MX, photo by Jordan Hoover at Evergood Co Overall, great time at a great track that will have me coming back next year! Hats off to the whole Evergood Co crew, as well as everyone at Oak Ridge MX, y’all killed it!   Be sure to stay tuned to the blog series and click/tap the “follow” button to stay updated on any new entries! You can also click the “follow” button on my profile to stay updated with anything I post on ThumperTalk. Thanks for following along, I’ll see you at the races!
    • 2 comments
    • 1,111 views
  • Garrahan Off-Road Training

    Video Riding Tip: Stand Up Cornering Techniques

    By Garrahan Off-Road Training

    Often times, stand up cornering is the best body positioning. In this training video I walk you through the correct techniques for stand up cornering and why they are important. Give it a watch and see how you're doing.  Thanks for watching! Brian Garrahan
    Garrahan Off-Road Training
    • 9 comments
    • 7,533 views
  • scottiedawg

    Alpacas in the Crosswalk

    By scottiedawg

    Guiding groups of dirtbikers through the Andes of Peru is surreal. First of all, it is a huge privilege to be able to do what I do. I love riding dirtbikes as much as anybody possibly can. Combine that with serving others by leading groups on various trails, providing communication support such as translating a menu, or taking a picture or video to help recall the memory at a later date, these are the things that I do. There are many other tasks as well, but to simplify things, my job isn't much of a job. It's pure joy!
        I always love it when people take a daring step towards something adventurous; Quitting a job to travel, starting a business, becoming a volunteer, adopting a child. This seems to be where life really gets exciting. Most of the people that join me on dirt bike tours are just that...They take the steps that most won't.  I love hanging out with these kinds of peeps.
    Recently, a couple of guys got in touch with me about doing a three day ride. One of the guys had a lot of dirtbike experience, but it was a couple of years back. The other, had experience, but it was 25 years back. This poses a challenge for a guy like me who has a duty to my customers to provide a legendary motorcycle experience. How can I mix these two friends up, show them some amazing back country of Peru, and somehow keep them safe, cover the necessary ground to complete the route, and assure them a plethora of smiles? It was a tall order, but I was willing to give it a go.

    I asked a lot of questions in order to get to know these guys a bit. Each customer is different and will respond to risk, thrill, fatigue, and stress in various ways. I put a plan together to cover a route that had all the elements to satisfy the more experienced rider, but also have easier options in case anyone was overwhelmed with the trail level. These guys put it all out there. We made it. I pushed their limits, gave them the thrill they were looking for, and had an amazing time getting to know a couple of great fellas.

    The whole experience is one that I give to my customers, but I also reap the benefit of the adventure. I often receive the privilege of lighting a flame of dirtbike passion in someone who may have lost it a while back. A few days after the trip, one of the guys let me know he was in the market for a new dirtbike...That's music to my ears.

    It's always a tough one to match skills in a group so that everyone can ride at the same level. In fact, it is almost impossible. However, I often deal with the differences. In this case, I used a smaller bike, had various route options, allowed the faster rider the freedom to freeride, and used a lot of flexibility in the plan. By the end of the first day, the lack of the past 25 years of riding became a non issue. A few tips, some verbal encouragement, and a reassurance that our team will make it to the other side was all that was needed. What a thrill it is for me to assist a customer to overcome obstacles on the trail!

    Do yourself and another rider a favor by opening up and being that mentor to help a newbie learn what someone taught you. We are all recipients of someone else's experiences. It costs little to share, but opens up a world to those who want to experience what we have.

    Make sure to check out the video to see what it's like to ride in the Andes of Peru! Until the next time, keep the wheels down!

    Scottiedawg Scott Englund is a seasoned hard enduro guide, explorer, and social entrepreneur living and operating MotoMission Peru in the heart of the Andes of Peru. MotoMission puts together a high end hard enduro tour filled with every kind of amazing you can think of. Contact Scott at Scott@motomissionperu.com to find out more about riding in the Andes.    
    • 1 comment
    • 349 views

Our community blogs

  1. To help you get the most from your daily efforts, here are some reminders on how to optimize your training & racing efforts.

    Eat Prior to Working Out

    If you eat too soon before you head out, you could be plagued with G.I. (gastro-intestinal) issues. But if your last snack or meal was more than three hours ago, you could run out of energy. The goal is to time your meals & snacks to provide a stabilized blood sugar level throughout your training sessions specific to your intensity levels. Accomplish this by eating every 2 hours after you wake up in the morning.

    Allow 2 hours after eating a complete meal before exercising – this allows for complete absorption and proper purging avoiding cramping. If you are tight on time, consume 8-10 ounces of Energy Fuel just prior to provide your brain and muscles the easily absorbable carbohydrates and electrolytes necessary for optimum muscle contraction and sweating.

     

    Foam Rolling (please use these videos)

    Use a foam roller before your workout and/or before working out. The direct pressure helps vasodilate (open up) the tissue bringing fresh blood to the muscles about to be used. When you foam roll prior to stretching, you will reduce the activation of the Stretch Reflex, reducing your risk of a pulled muscle.

    Chronic aches and pains like Achilles tendinitis, planter fascia, etc. benefit from direct pressure before exercise because it increases blood flow & muscle elasticity. Training is more productive when tender/sore spots are warm. Start by rolling with a tennis ball move to a lacrosse ball then manual massage then sport specific exercise.

     

    Warm Up

    Your warm up is an activity that allows the body to transition from inactivity to activity and to distribute the blood flow into the extremities. This distribution of blood warms up the muscles, tendons, cartilage and ligaments avoiding any cramping or tearing.

     

    Refuel

    Immediately after training, your muscles and liver are looking for simple sugar to replenish your storage levels for the next workout. Your window of opportunity is 20-30 minutes after you finish because of an enzyme (glycogen synthase) that is at its highest activity level immediately following exercise. By consuming real food that is easily digestible is the key to optimum replenishment and recovery.

    By implementing these non sweating performance elements on a daily basis, just adds more tools to help you Work Smart, Not Hard!

    Yours in health & sport,

    -Coach Robb 

     

  2. Guiding groups of dirtbikers through the Andes of Peru is surreal. First of all, it is a huge privilege to be able to do what I do. I love riding dirtbikes as much as anybody possibly can. Combine that with serving others by leading groups on various trails, providing communication support such as translating a menu, or taking a picture or video to help recall the memory at a later date, these are the things that I do. There are many other tasks as well, but to simplify things, my job isn't much of a job. It's pure joy!
     

     

    20171113_115447.jpg.fcff54e15e91067732d73815d6a34ec0.jpg20171113_163112.jpg.7f62af5f8e03e5b33ec4da096183a654.jpg

    I always love it when people take a daring step towards something adventurous; Quitting a job to travel, starting a business, becoming a volunteer, adopting a child. This seems to be where life really gets exciting. Most of the people that join me on dirt bike tours are just that...They take the steps that most won't.  I love hanging out with these kinds of peeps.
    Recently, a couple of guys got in touch with me about doing a three day ride. One of the guys had a lot of dirtbike experience, but it was a couple of years back. The other, had experience, but it was 25 years back. This poses a challenge for a guy like me who has a duty to my customers to provide a legendary motorcycle experience. How can I mix these two friends up, show them some amazing back country of Peru, and somehow keep them safe, cover the necessary ground to complete the route, and assure them a plethora of smiles? It was a tall order, but I was willing to give it a go.

    20171114_124800.jpg.e099cc15b8b8e1661a04caa1857d1817.jpg20171114_102936.jpg.b83cd444cd85e51e9f9f98c64acb4f57.jpg

    I asked a lot of questions in order to get to know these guys a bit. Each customer is different and will respond to risk, thrill, fatigue, and stress in various ways. I put a plan together to cover a route that had all the elements to satisfy the more experienced rider, but also have easier options in case anyone was overwhelmed with the trail level. These guys put it all out there. We made it. I pushed their limits, gave them the thrill they were looking for, and had an amazing time getting to know a couple of great fellas.

    The whole experience is one that I give to my customers, but I also reap the benefit of the adventure. I often receive the privilege of lighting a flame of dirtbike passion in someone who may have lost it a while back. A few days after the trip, one of the guys let me know he was in the market for a new dirtbike...That's music to my ears.

    20171114_131021.jpg.367b844f7548c43171ee0deade776e59.jpg20171115_174852.jpg.74d5d5538306e7ecf78b9dbf8c17b714.jpg

    It's always a tough one to match skills in a group so that everyone can ride at the same level. In fact, it is almost impossible. However, I often deal with the differences. In this case, I used a smaller bike, had various route options, allowed the faster rider the freedom to freeride, and used a lot of flexibility in the plan. By the end of the first day, the lack of the past 25 years of riding became a non issue. A few tips, some verbal encouragement, and a reassurance that our team will make it to the other side was all that was needed. What a thrill it is for me to assist a customer to overcome obstacles on the trail!

    20171115_130608.jpg.e0292b8ab9c66caaad147a7142b05a64.jpg20171115_113836.jpg.de882d22da0fd55f21b27b6e241d78b1.jpg20171115_141629.jpg.a00953e9ff2f395f48573cfab720d201.jpg

    Do yourself and another rider a favor by opening up and being that mentor to help a newbie learn what someone taught you. We are all recipients of someone else's experiences. It costs little to share, but opens up a world to those who want to experience what we have.

    Make sure to check out the video to see what it's like to ride in the Andes of Peru!

    Until the next time, keep the wheels down!

    Scottiedawg

    Scott Englund is a seasoned hard enduro guide, explorer, and social entrepreneur living and operating MotoMission Peru in the heart of the Andes of Peru. MotoMission puts together a high end hard enduro tour filled with every kind of amazing you can think of. Contact Scott at Scott@motomissionperu.com to find out more about riding in the Andes.

    20171114_143335.jpg.0722a94e59b01ac2fa1d0d1e261f51d8.jpg

     

     

  3. 5a148ebd8fed2_TheTwoStrokeDirtBikeEngineBuildingHandbookeBookandPrintBookversionsavailable.png.24be2b2d960fcbfa4a6aeb29d47355ad.png

    In today's post, I'm very excited to share details about my new book,The Two Stroke Dirt Bike Engine Building Handbook. As with all of my blogs and technical resources, my goal has been to bring riders clear and concise technical information. My two-stroke book exemplifies this and puts nearly 300 pages of engine building knowledge at your fingertips.

    5a148ff205690_TwoStrokeHandbookPhotograph2.png.36116de30c3ce7a15001cf0940c2d10a.png

    I wroteThe Two Stroke Dirt Bike Engine Building Handbook to be an all-encompassing guide on engine building. From the moment there is doubt about the engine's overall condition to the time the rebuilt engine is broken in, I give you a step-by-step guide to help you work towards a successful build. My aim was to create a definitive resource that hit on all the relevant topics you'll encounter as you proceed through an engine build and take any guesswork out of the equation.

    Throughout the book, engineering knowledge and practical experience are fused together to detail the how and why behind the way procedures are performed, parts are designed, and engine performance is affected. This is the most important and valuable aspect of the book, and it's something you won't find in a service manual. The book doesn't just tell you to bolt part A to part B, it teaches and explains the correct way assembly procedures should be performed and why it is necessary to do so. It also explains the intricate relationship between parts, where to look for wear patterns, and shows examples of worn and damaged components.

    5a148ff9c7cce_TwoStrokeHandbookPhotograph3.png.bdbe69b7bc8db0b22a3ae58570d545f9.png

    If you're interested in making modifications to your engine or if you're curious about how certain modifications affect performance, I wrote an entire chapter dedicated to the subject. Within this chapter a discussion on how performance parts such as expansion chambers, port timing modifications, and cylinder heads alter overall engine performance is included and helpful suggestions are provided to aid you in choosing the correct components for your build, depending on your specific riding needs.

    5a148fe90ab6b_TwoStrokeHandbookPhotograph1.png.c038d7e3de5d8972f580f0778454149b.png

    If you have a thirst to learn more about how your engine works and a desire to correctly disassemble or assemble an engine to professional standards, you will benefit greatly from this book. Whether a complete beginner or a seasoned builder, with nearly 300 pages and 250 images worth of information, there is fresh and useful knowledge for everyone. There is also valuable material packed into this handbook that doesn't just pertain to the act of building the engine. I include instruction on diagnosing engine problems, sourcing and determining which parts to replace, using precision measuring tools, setting up your workshop, and additional tests and inspections that should be performed when preparing racing engines. If you just want to build your engine back up to stock spec, you are covered. If you want to go the extra mile and prepare a racing engine, you are also covered. In a way, this book allows you to choose your own ending by giving you all the tools and knowledge you need to complete your build at whatever level you decide.

    As a way to thank you for your support, we're offering TT members 15% off during a special TT pre-sale which runs from now until December 5th (when the book officially launches). Simply follow this link to learn more and order: ThumperTalk Pre-Sale

    Thanks again for all your support as we've grown DIY Moto Fix from an idea to a thriving community of riders who are passionate about making their machines perform better through their own hard work.

    Thanks for reading and have a great week.

    -Paul

     

     

  4. Hello ThumperTalk readers! I have to say that of all the things I write about, I enjoy writing about going to races that are put on by great companies to recognize the unrecognized talent. Recently, I made the trip to such a race in Iowa, called the Evergood Open at Oak Ridge MX, and I’m here to tell you about it.

    I will admit, I have a certain level of bias when it comes to races like the Evergood Open or the MX Reunion races, because it was through the Vurb Classic in 2012 at Echeconnee that I was recognized for my never-quit pursuit of a W against some stiff competition. Through the help I received from Race Tech because of the recognition and my performances at other Vurb Classic events and amateur nationals, I’ve brought myself to where I am now, and that’s not something I take lightly. Being brutally honest, the top level of support in the motocross industry is a tight nit group and it is hard to break into without solid results. These events give those who truly need the help the opportunity to get the help they need to make their journey to the top a possibility. Hats off to the companies who participate in these events that are giving deserving riders the opportunity to succeed, because that’s truly what you’re doing.

    vc.jpe.c741488ef270b2a55bacc727c34f456c.jpe

    2013 Vurb Classic @ MX207

    The staff at Evergood Co truly put on a great event that I will not soon forget. Not only did some great riders get recognized, but the event was held at possibly the coolest track I’ve ever been on. Also, the event was just plain fun! It wasn’t super high stakes, and instead was laid back and all about everyone having a good time. Everything from the track, to the people, environment, and activities after racing made the event feel like the drive was paid back in spades.

    IMG_1243.JPG.477a1abe608bbd98764aee3c3ebfb350.JPG

    Evergood Open @ Oak Ridge MX, photo by Jordan Hoover at Evergood Co

    Whether we realize it or not, if you’re a racer who competes for money or the goal of making a career of it, we get so sucked into the winning mindset that we forget that there’s more fun in motocross (or whatever you race) than just winning. One thing that I found super fun about the Evergood Open was the holeshot competition! It was intense… and I was genuinely concerned when I saw a 1200cc BMW flat-track bike pull up. However, I did end up winning on the 250f! If winning it wasn’t cool enough, interviews and popping a champagne bottle is icing on the cake to top off a good day of racing on a great track! I also think it’s great for the spectators, being able to see more than just racing, and it creates a great atmosphere for everyone. I mean, who doesn’t love watching people bang bars off a start for $100 all while playing some AC/DC?

    IMG_1239.thumb.JPG.8c29a5f83b20f3afaf6460fb321dc565.JPG

    Evergood Open @ Oak Ridge MX, photo by Jordan Hoover at Evergood Co

    Another great thing about the Evergood Open was being able to meet different people, including those that we look up to. Over the weekend I got to meet Jeff Emig and Jason Anderson… not during a schedule; just walk up and started talking. Being able to chat a bit to people you look up to and get their perspectives and simply listen to what they have to say about a track is priceless. Being able to talk to Emig one-on-one about his ideology towards racing and explaining why he maneuvers the track like he does creates a new perspective that can be utilized if implemented correctly into your own personal riding style.

    IMG_1242.JPG.bd683ca683dd79f79ed2a3a29d5817b5.JPG

    Evergood Open @ Oak Ridge MX, photo by Jordan Hoover at Evergood Co

    Overall, great time at a great track that will have me coming back next year! Hats off to the whole Evergood Co crew, as well as everyone at Oak Ridge MX, y’all killed it!

     

    Be sure to stay tuned to the blog series and click/tap the “follow” button to stay updated on any new entries! You can also click the “follow” button on my profile to stay updated with anything I post on ThumperTalk. Thanks for following along, I’ll see you at the races!

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  5. Had a great day of riding Saturday with my buddy @Bryan Bosch in the Withlacoochee National Forrest just north of Dade City, Fl. It's still pretty wet from the summer rains and Hurricane Irma didn't help! But, like always, the 701 took everything in stride, even with worn Continental TKC80 tires. Well, "almost" everything...

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    Unfortunately, the trail riding portion of the day got cut short because of a little mishap that resulted in my clutch perch letting go of the handlebars...

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    As we left the sandy trails, turning onto a damp, hard-packed clay road, just a tiny little goose of the throttle caused the bike to walk sideways into an unrecoverable low-speed drop...

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    Since the fall seemed so minor, I was surprised to see that the pinch bolt for the clutch perch had pulled out the threads! Uhhhhh, this is the "Enduro" model, not the wimpy SM version or even more girly-man KTM 690 Enduro R! IT'S a HUSKY!!!!! ;)

    Fortunately my riding partner is a zip tie junkie, so we patched things up enough to get 'er home.

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    When I got it home, I noticed that the threads went quite a bit deeper than the factory installed bolt was taking advantage of, so I was able to thread it back together using a longer bolt. Clearly this is a bit of a weak spot on the big girl, so I'll be installing REAL hand guards shortly.

    What hand guards do you guys like? Hit me up in the comments section below and don't be afraid to share your pictures. I'd love your help in picking out a pair of hand guards. Time to replace the stock wannbe  "bug guards" er, huh... "hand guards". 
     

    Bryan Bosch
    Steve Claus
    #dualsportduo

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    Moto the big girls? Thought about it!!!! ;) - Dade City MX park on the way home. At least the KTM comes with full wrap around hand guards.

  6. Often times, stand up cornering is the best body positioning. In this training video I walk you through the correct techniques for stand up cornering and why they are important. Give it a watch and see how you're doing. 

    Thanks for watching!

    Brian Garrahan
    Garrahan Off-Road Training
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  7. UNLV Rebel MX Club
    Latest Entry

    What is the Rebel MX Club up to today?  We have a lot planned for this upcoming school year and we are excited to tell you about it.  Our purpose is to grow the dirt bike community and that is what we plan to do! In Las Vegas, Nevada, our riding season is from October until March so of course we will be doing lots of riding and camping and having a good time but we also plan to expand the dirt bike community! In the spring of our last school year we held our first ride day where we taught 3 brand new individuals how to ride a dirt bike! We started the students out on a CRF 50 to learn some throttle control and shifting up into the next gears and coming to a stop. Once the students felt more comfortable we moved them on up to a CR 85 or a CR 125 depending on their size.  We put together a short little video of our first ride day on our youtube page if you'd like to go check it out at this link:

    For this upcoming Fall semester we have six Learn How to Ride Days planned and we are stoked to teach some new people how to ride a dirt bike but we need the dirt bike community's help!!  Our awesome student government called the Consolidated Students of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (CSUN) has granted us $1000 to buy a dirt bike to teach our students on.  We are currently searching for a dirt bike to purchase for our club. If you or someone you know is in the surrounding area of Las Vegas, Nevada and have a dirt bike that you would like to sell please let us know! We are also looking for some possible donor bikes that might need a little work that anyone would like to donate to our club.  The more bikes that we have means more students and community members we can have learning.  If there are any vendors or reps out there that would like to sponsor some gear to keep people protected we would greatly appreciate it and would be proud to represent your brand. The same goes for gear as it goes for the dirt bikes, we would greatly appreciate some old donor gear or hand me downs that you would like to donate.  If you would like to help the Rebel MX Club achieve our goals you can contact us on our Facebook Page: UNLV Rebel MX Club or through our email at rebelmx.unlv@gmail.com or leave us a comment in the bottom of our blog! Our general meeting and first ride day will occur on September 6th and 9th. We will post more about the details on our Facebook Page. Anyone is welcome to come, you don't have to be a UNLV Student.  Thanks for reading. We will post an update on our first ride day after it occurs.  Keep on braaaaping.

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    Sure, it's fun to put some laps in on a motocross track. But, you'll fall short of your potential if you're not using this key practice law of practicing important techniques separately. This is true for motocross cornering skills as well as motocross jumping skills. Did you know that riding really well requires mastering as many as 55 separate techniques, all laced seamlessly together?

     

     

    If you'd like more of my riding tips, browse my blog here on ThumperTalk or my website. If you'd like to be notified when I post new riding tips, subscribe by clicking the "follow" button (upper right). :thumbsup: