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  • Coach Robb

    Simple Components of Success That You Can Do Today!

    By Coach Robb

    To help you get the most from your daily efforts, here are some reminders on how to optimize your training & racing efforts. Eat Prior to Working Out If you eat too soon before you head out, you could be plagued with G.I. (gastro-intestinal) issues. But if your last snack or meal was more than three hours ago, you could run out of energy. The goal is to time your meals & snacks to provide a stabilized blood sugar level throughout your training sessions specific to your intensity levels. Accomplish this by eating every 2 hours after you wake up in the morning. Allow 2 hours after eating a complete meal before exercising – this allows for complete absorption and proper purging avoiding cramping. If you are tight on time, consume 8-10 ounces of Energy Fuel just prior to provide your brain and muscles the easily absorbable carbohydrates and electrolytes necessary for optimum muscle contraction and sweating.   Foam Rolling (please use these videos) Use a foam roller before your workout and/or before working out. The direct pressure helps vasodilate (open up) the tissue bringing fresh blood to the muscles about to be used. When you foam roll prior to stretching, you will reduce the activation of the Stretch Reflex, reducing your risk of a pulled muscle. Chronic aches and pains like Achilles tendinitis, planter fascia, etc. benefit from direct pressure before exercise because it increases blood flow & muscle elasticity. Training is more productive when tender/sore spots are warm. Start by rolling with a tennis ball move to a lacrosse ball then manual massage then sport specific exercise.   Warm Up Your warm up is an activity that allows the body to transition from inactivity to activity and to distribute the blood flow into the extremities. This distribution of blood warms up the muscles, tendons, cartilage and ligaments avoiding any cramping or tearing.   Refuel Immediately after training, your muscles and liver are looking for simple sugar to replenish your storage levels for the next workout. Your window of opportunity is 20-30 minutes after you finish because of an enzyme (glycogen synthase) that is at its highest activity level immediately following exercise. By consuming real food that is easily digestible is the key to optimum replenishment and recovery. By implementing these non sweating performance elements on a daily basis, just adds more tools to help you Work Smart, Not Hard! Yours in health & sport, -Coach Robb     
    • 0 comments
    • 1,802 views
  • scottiedawg

    C'mon Dad!

    By scottiedawg

    Over the course of my time operating MotoMission Peru, I have had various opportunities to host/guide dirt bike adventures with other riders. I have a special place in my heart for father/son adventures. I guess it must have something to do with the sentiment I have with my dad.   Official MotoMission Tour Video...Check the others on our Youtube Channel   Dirtbikes and Dads go together When Tony and Joran contacted me about doing a tour, my excitement level rose. A father/son combo with limited dirt bike experience would be a challenge, but a welcome one. I normally cater to seasoned riders, but his one would put a different pressure on me as the guide. I needed to push these guys to their limits, while completing a route within our time frame of four days. The terrain needed to fit both the skill level and the distance we needed to cover each day. The fellas wanted to roll their tires over some amazing parts of Peru, get some mind blowing pics,  and live to tell about it. A face with a smile tells a story My work was cut out for me. I put Joran on a crf 230 because of his size and experience. Dad, Tony, was on the Husky 300, I rode a Honda 450x. I figured I could swap out with one of them if I needed. Bike selection worked out perfectly. The route itself was ideal. It was a mix of single track, some rough two track, and some free ride(go where ever you want) type of stuff. It was perfect to try a hand at hill climbs, scare oneself silly on rock fixtures, and put the tires on the edge of mountain ledges to make the heart flutter a bit. The ride was fantastic. Tony and Joran both expanded their riding level to new heights. In fact, I was able to coach the guys on various little riding tricks that someone showed me along my journey.  Stand up more, focus eyes on where you want to go,  as well as some mechanics of body positioning and how it relates to traction and control. It was a bit of a seminar/riding school/test day. No doubt that the guys are better riders now. I thoroughly enjoyed that part of the tour.

    The view they wanted to see!
      When it all boils down, we had a fantastic four days of riding. Each were pushed to the limit various times each day. When the heads hit the pillows each night, it took no time for the sleep to begin.  Smiles were abundant, and there were no shortages of whoops, hollars, and high fives.

    Certainly another successful tour!   MotoMission Peru is a social enterprise operated by Scott Englund. If you want to see the Andes via dirtbike, this is how to do it. High quality in every aspect. Service, guide, routes, equipment, and overall experience cannot be beat. Contact Scott via Thumpertalk messaging or at scott@motomissionperu.com for more information.
    • 3 comments
    • 1,980 views
  • Garrahan Off-Road Training

    Video Riding Tip: Stand Up Cornering Techniques

    By Garrahan Off-Road Training

    Often times, stand up cornering is the best body positioning. In this training video I walk you through the correct techniques for stand up cornering and why they are important. Give it a watch and see how you're doing.  Thanks for watching! Brian Garrahan
    Garrahan Off-Road Training
     
    • 12 comments
    • 10,482 views
  • Scott Meshey 141

    Preparation: The Effort

    By Scott Meshey 141

    Hello ThumperTalk readers! Welcome to the second entry of my blog series, following my journey exiting the amateur ranks into pro status. For more information about the blog series, check out the first entry, The Beginning of the Journey. For now, I’ll be taking a dip into my approach to the Loretta Lynn’s qualification process and preparing myself for regionals and forward.  In the past, I’ve had a bit of a “just wing it” approach to what I did as far as racing went. While it has garnered me some success, it does not yield what I am truly capable of. Before I was released by my doctor to come back to racing, my family and I made the decision that we would change things up a bit. Of course, changes in plans isn’t uncharacteristic in a sport where there isn’t a whole lot that is certain. Like any racer, sometimes we have to switch up our lines in order to achieve the same goal. 

    Wildwood MX, Picture by Bobby Bammann My approach is this… be as prepared as possible and do not rush the processes that take time. It wouldn’t be very wise to rush into the first regional event with semi-adequate preparation, not only in the sense of myself, but also my bike. Instead, I am giving myself plenty of time to continue riding, becoming faster on the bike and becoming stronger physically and mentally through gate drops and training with great people who know the process and know what it takes to reach where I want to go. Every time I am on the bike, I strive to learn something new about myself, the bike, push myself to try new things, and if I am unsure about something, be open to the advice given. With that being said, big thanks to those in my company that are making my journey to make myself great more possible than ever; Ricky Renner, RJ Hampshire, and DJ MacFarlane. I personally believe that the best form of training is to race. If you fall in a moto during training, you can rush to get up and get back going again to simulate a race. However, the environment of actually being in a race where everything you do has a real consequence can create a very different mindset. Gate drops are key in order to have your important race days on lock *insert key-and-lock emoji here*. Obviously, having A class payback is always a nice incentive to go racing… getting some gate drops in and make a couple bucks in the process. On the other hand, experience, and of course fun, is what it’s all about. If you can’t keep it fun, then it’s not worth pursuing. Dade City MX, Picture by Erwin Ziegler I’ve never lived at a training facility, so my efforts have required a different level of mental toughness where no one is forcing my hand at being “mentally tough”. My efforts are self-imposed and they require the want and drive in myself to achieve success. Most of my competitors at the top level of amateur racing have spent months and years at training facilities with the constant intensity of daily and hourly practice and training sessions, being pushed beyond what I have ever experienced, other than my few weeks here-and-there training with professionals. After a year off, my hunger and desire to get back and surpass my previous standing in the racing community pushes me to aggressively attack my riding and training time with a new level of determination and maturity to quickly reconcile mistakes, figure out why I goofed it, make necessary adjustments, and find the best course of action for me to be the best I can be. Lazy River MX Loretta Lynn's Area Qualifier, still shot from a video taken by Ricky Renner By this time next month, regionals will be finishing up and it’ll be time to prepare for the big show. Check in for content along the way and come along for the ride, tap/click the "Follow" button! I’ll see you at the races.  Scott Meshey #141
    • 1 comment
    • 768 views
  • Coach Robb

    MotoE - Fueling for Performance Bundle Now Available!

    By Coach Robb

    Frustrated with trying to figure out what or when to eat and drink during your athletic training and racing? Cramping? Bonking? Feeling tired all the time? Whether you’re a national champion or weekend warrior, this workshop is designed for every type of racer. MotoE founder, Coach Robb applies his 34 years of experience as a nutrition and performance coach to provide proven solutions to the most common nutrition and hydration frustrations. You will walk away with: ▶ Customized nutritional & hydration strategy for improved strength to weight ratios, speed & endurance ▶ Proven process for determining what you need to eat & drink (and how often) during training and racing ▶ Clear understanding of what foods aid in muscle recovery and support your adrenal and immune systems Order Here - CLICK HERE Get a sneak peek of the presentation here:      
    • 0 comments
    • 482 views
 

Ready! Camera! Action! Making Your Ride Video POP!

So many of us have one. We drag it around each ride. Some mount it to our helmets, some put it on a chest, and yet some use it with a tripod. The action camera has been a catalyst in the world of sports to bring all of its excitement to a screen near you. I remember back in college duct taping a big VHS camera around our bodies as we leapt off bridges. We loved to revisit the adventure later on. There is something captivating about sharing experiences with others. It's part of a visual storytelling phenomenon in which many have become addicted. I am one of them. Have you ever sat through a treacherous three minute ride video that your buddy put together? He was so stoked about it, but as you reached the 20 second mark you wanted to do something else? Was it all taken from the latest GoPro mounted on his helmet? The sound consisted of a wound out two stroke at blaring levels? Yeah, I've been there. In fact, that may have been one of my earlier videos. I ride dirtbikes in one of the coolest places on the planet. As I have been exploring the backcountry of Peru over the years, I have picked up some great ride shots via my handy little GoPro. Times have changed a bit with technology. Now, I capture 4k footage straight onto my phone, I can fly a drone above and beyond to bring even better footage back home to show the audience. The mount options are infinite as well as the gadgets for taking different shots. All of this technology has opened up a new passion for me. I have combined my longing to lay my tires on new tracks with the thrill of capturing the right shot. I also love to write and tell stories. Over the past decade, I have developed a pet peeve with bad videos. I certainly cannot claim to be top drawer when it comes to talent, but there are a few things that I have learned along the way that can help you put better videos together. I have included my latest ride video of a group of three guys and myself that hammered our way through some great riding in the Andes of Peru. It is more of a ride video and not much of a story video. My plan is to use it as an example. Whether you think it's good or bad is your opinion.  My hope is that you can improve the viewability of your videos with just a couple of practical and simple to use techniques. Besides, you want people to enjoy your work.
  Keep the camera still Whenever possible, use a tripod, a rock, a prop up device to keep the camera from moving while taking the shot. This goes for those that are using basic stuff. If you don't have a gimbal (most riders don't carry one around in their tool pouch) use creativity to figure out a way to place your camera on a solid spot. Personally I almost always use a flexible, three legged tripod to mount my Samsung S7. I can place it anywhere, I keep it in my pocket on my riding pants, and can set it up before the guys come around the corner and into the shot. Take short clips If you have ever spent much time editing, you understand. Large files have to be processed by your computer even if you only want a three second clip of a 45 minute file. Another reason to keep them short is for entertainment purposes. Mainstream movies change camera views and angles each few seconds. Its so you don't get bored with the film. Same thing goes for your ride video. Mix it up where possible. Many Points of View As I mentioned above, changing camera angles will make your video easier to watch. If you watch a 5 minute video of the same helmet mounted GoPro footage, you might die. It's boring for most everybody that wasn't on the bike. Its OK to use helmet mounts, but change the scene. Stop and film your buddies zipping by as they bang through the rocks. Pan around and take in some pretty scenes. Follow along on that gnarly section of trail. Get in your buddy's face and ask him about how he crashed. Film a high five or fist bump. Mix those in with your video and you will make it much more enjoyable to watch. Length of Video Keep your edits between two and three minutes preferably, and under five minutes for best audience gain. Many of the professionals on social media talk about how important it is to keep things short. People have little windows of time that they can sneak in a Youtube video. If you have a 45 minute movie, they probably won't be able to check it out while on their coffee break. They also won't run over to Charlie and say, "Hey, check this one out!"  In my experience, it's like pricing...Keep it under the minute markers...do a 2:59 second video instead of a 3:02 video. In general, the shorter the better. I try to keep ride videos to the three to four minute mark per day. Pack the best stuff in there and get rid of the rest. People will watch your videos much more often. In addition, there are limits on social media for file size and video quality. Last thing you want to do is make a cool video to find out the file is too big for your Facebook page. Keep Edits Simple You don't need to add a million crazy transitions or graphics. Unless it is done well, its more of a distraction. Transition from shot to shot with basic cuts. Is easier and works well with ride videos. The Rule of Thirds This is a time tested film and photo basic...Take your screen and divide it into thirds, up and down and side to side. Basically make a tic tac toe board on your screen. Place your subject in one of the corners of the middle square. If you have a full length subject that takes most of the height of the screen, place the subject on one of the up and down lines. It creates perspective and makes a better shot. Same goes with horizons and mountain backgrounds. Place them on one of the horizontal thirds to make your image more pleasing.

Subject is not centered in the middle of the frame...but rather on one of the 1/3 lines.   Sound If you don't record good sound with your video, don't put it in there. If you are making a sandwich and the bread is bad, it will make your whole sandwich bad, even if you have the best cheese and meat. Cover up with clear voice over or music. Smart phones usually have good sound recording for videos. Use the best you have available, and if you have little to work with, put in more music. Story You are trying to tell as story each time you make a video. Keep an eye out for things that stand out to make your story interesting. A wreck, funny things people say, beautiful scenery, obstacles and struggles, and anything else that stands out in your story. Highlight it with clips that you have taken and your video will be better for it. As for the video that I included in the post, look it over. I have put many of these principles into practice. It's not perfect, but imagine what it would be like to have only on point of view, or mumbled GoPro sound? Do yourself and your friends a favor and make those videos more entertaining to watch. Until the next time...keep the wheels down. Scottiedawg   Scott Englund is a social entrepreneur living in Cusco Peru. Scott operates MotoMission Peru, which offers super exotic hard enduro tours through the Andes. You can check out MotoMission Peru by visiting the website at www.Motomissionperu.com or find them on Facebook or check out other ride videos and media on the MotoMission Peru Dirtbike Adventures YouTube Channel. Feel free to contact Scott right here through TT if you have any questions about MotoMission Peru.
 

scottiedawg

scottiedawg

 

How to Separate Your Crankcases The Right Way

“Splitting the cases” is often referred to as a daunting or undesirable task, but if you are well prepared and properly equipped then it can be a straightforward job. To alleviate any concerns you may have with the task, I want to discuss best practices and share some tips that you may find useful when dealing with crank bearings that utilize an interference fit with the crankshaft. We’ll get started by discussing preparatory items and work through to completing the job. Preparation I always recommend prepping for crankcase separation by thoroughly reviewing the service manual. This is important in case any special instructions are present, such as guidance on how the crankcases should be positioned. Typically, it is advantageous to lift one half off the other in a certain orientation due to the way the gearbox or other components are installed. Secondly, a review of the manual may highlight any specific hardware that must be removed prior to attempting to split the cases. From a tools standpoint, a crankcase splitter tool is a worthy investment because it will help ensure the job goes smoothly. Case splitters are relatively inexpensive and widely available. Alternatively, for the budget conscious or lesser prepared, a case splitter is something that could be fabricated. Whether buying or making, ensure you pick up a model with a protective end cap for the crankshaft or fabricate one. We’ll discuss the end cap later. The other tools required are all fairly standard and include your typical sockets, wrenches, and soft mallets. Wooden blocks or other soft semi-malleable spacers should be selected which level and raise the crankcases off the tabletop. This allows the cases to be positioned so that the split line between the cases lies horizontally and subsequent splitting can be done vertically. This will help ensure evenness of separation as well as reduce the likelihood of components falling out of the cases unexpectedly. As much as shortcuts are desirable, just about everything external to the cases must be removed in order to successfully split the cases. Clutch, stator, crank gear, etc. must be removed prior to case splitting. Your service manual will provide further clarity as to what needs to come off. Technique & Tips Once you’re ready to separate the cases, the first thing we’ll need to do is remove all the crankcase bolts. The crankcase bolts should be removed via any prescribed patterns outlined in the service manual. Since the crankcase bolts are typically several different lengths, ensuring the location of each bolt is well documented is extremely important. As I discussed in my post on keeping track of bolts, the cardboard gasket method or any other you find suitable should be utilized so that the reassembly process is straightforward later on. After the crankcase bolts have been removed, the crankcases should be inspected one final time to ensure no hardware that should have been removed prior is hitchhiking. Trust me, trying to separate cases only to find there is one last forgotten bolt is quite frustrating! Once you’re confident all the necessary hardware has been removed, position the cases on the blocks with the correct half facing up. Next, install the protective cap over the crankshaft. I advise using the cap whether you own a two or four-stroke simply because in both cases it helps preserve the end of the crankshaft. This is of particular importance on four-stroke engines that utilize an oil feed that passes through the crank. Once the crank end is protected, proceed to install the crankcase splitter. Select threaded holes that are as close to equispaced from one another as possible to promote uniform loading of the case splitter. When threading the case splitter studs into the crankcase, make sure you engage at least 1.5 times the diameter of the stud diameter. For example, if the stud is 6mm in diameter make sure at least 9mm of thread engagement length is achieved. This will help ensure the threads are not stripped when you attempt to separate the crankcases. With the crankcase splitter installed begin tensioning the main bolt against the end of the protective cap. Proceed to tighten the bolt until the crankcases begin to separate about a 1/16” (1.5mm). Once separation has occurred, make sure that separation is even all the way around the cases. Due to the way the case splitter loads the cases, the area near the output sprocket tends to lag. Case separation needs to be even so that the dowel pins used to pair the cases together don’t bind. If the output sprocket end of the cases hasn’t separated, use a soft rubber or plastic mallet to gently tap in that area. Tap carefully and only on case areas that appear sturdy. Once you’ve created an even gap, proceed to tension the splitter bolt, tap when necessary, and fully remove the crankcase. Upon separation, make sure that no gearbox components, such as washers, have stuck to the case. What I’ve described is the ideal sequence of events for a successful case separation, however, occasionally the cases won’t be as cooperative. In the past, I’ve had to deal with crankcases where moisture has found its way into the dowel pin bores and corroded the dowel pins. This effectively seizes the dowel pins in their bores and makes the separation job more challenging. If the crankcases are being resilient to separation, stuck dowel pins may be a potential problem. Most dowel pins are located opposite one another and their exact position can often be referenced in the service manual or in the crankcase section of part microfiches. Once the location of the dowel pins has been confirmed, a torch can be used to lightly heat the dowel pin areas. Heat will expand the metal surrounding the dowel pin and aid in freeing up the stuck pin bore. Usually, a few careful rounds of heat, tension on the splitter, and well-placed tapping is enough to free up the pesky cases and get them separated. Alternatively, if the heat does not help, applying a penetrant to the pin bore areas is another option that may help free things up. If you find yourself dealing with stuck cases, the key is to be patient and think through all your options. In these types of situations, most mistakes are avoidable and are usually the result of rushed decisions.    Once the cases have been separated, the remaining tasks of removing the gearbox and pushing the crank out of the remaining case half can commence. I hope you’ve enjoyed this write up on crankcase separation and that it makes you more prepared for the job. If you’ve got additional crankcase separation tips that you want to share, please leave a comment below. For additional engine building information, whether two or four-stroke, check out my engine building handbooks. Each handbook is offered in print or digital form, contains over 250 color pictures, detailed instruction from start to finish on full rebuilds, and contains a wealth of information pertaining to diagnostic testing and precision measuring.
Thanks and have a great week! -Paul

Paul Olesen

Paul Olesen

 

Coach Robb Podcast #11 - Now Available!

Are you frustrated that your training and eating habits are not producing the results you are looking for? Coach Robb’s Podcast #11 drills down on the top six culprits that could be holding you back. Coach Robb taps into his 30+ years of working with clients, athletes and racers to outline how overlooking little things can create a domino effect that undermines your efforts and eventually your health without you seeing it until it is too late. He also explains why trying harder is not always the correct mindset when it comes to breaking through personal plateaus. If you are tired of being tired or ready to bust through performance glass ceilings, you don’t want to miss this podcast!  

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

The Arenacross Trials

Hello TT readers! I’ll be taking a little bit of a different approach to my entries. I’m looking to focus a little more on how my prep goes and things I learned from prep and my race, rather than on the race itself. Also, my entries may look different than they were before. Of course, if you’d like to see any more about the race itself, feel free to find me on social media! A few things I have learned recently: Keep up with the times Patience is key Don’t over jump and flat land a Supercross catapult _______________________________________________________________ Those who follow me on social media or race around the central Florida area know that I have switched from Kawasaki to Husqvarna. This decision came about after a few experiences where I felt that I was bested only by the power of the bikes I was racing against. Not that my bike wasn’t fast, but it was not a 6-hour motor like many of the pro-level bikes I line up against, and to make my bike that fast was going to cost a lot of money and lose a lot of reliability. When I had heard that Husqvarnas came stock with a substantial amount of power more accompanied with less weight, I was thoroughly shocked. After doing some research on different bike brands and the advancements in technology I felt like I had been living under a rock! Of course, once I got my FC250 I was even more blown away at the nimbleness of the bike and how well the stock suspension worked. Pay attention and keep up with the times! Before I was able to ride any Arenacross, I had less than 7 or 8 hours logged on my new bike and had been riding on stock suspension on outdoor tracks, a very different reality from what I needed to become accustomed to. I think that was good to learn the ergonomics of the bike, but also, I hadn’t ridden on stock suspension (especially on a place like Gatorback MX) in years because I have worked closely with Race Tech. Helped keep me humble and remind me how lucky I am to have some of the best suspension in the business!   Thankfully, I had the opportunity to train at the South of the Border training facility the week of the Greensboro Arenacross. When I showed up to the SOBMX Arenacross track on Monday, I really didn’t know what to expect out of myself, and I wasn’t entirely sure where to start. However, I did know that I did not have much time before the weekend and I needed to get myself situated and get down to business if I had any hopes of gaining my Road to SX points. While it took me a couple of laps, I quickly tapped into the skills I had gained from 2 years ago racing AX. I was quickly reminded, however, that in that type of tight riding and especially in the whoops needed to be taken with a bit of patience. It only took one “holy crap I’m about to eat dirt” moment on the AX track. In motocross, the motos may be longer and the tracks are bigger, but you have moments for rest and can usually keep it very smooth and not expend a ton of energy. In AX, this is not the case. It is constant setting up and adjusting and analyzation and awareness which can be both mentally and physically exhausting if you don’t learn how to make your moves less dramatic and set up correctly to fight the bike less. Patience is key, don’t rush it! 2018 Greensboro Arenacross, photo by MEPMX Now, onto the fails! After gaining some useful time on the AX track and relearning how to approach the obstacles and rework my thoughts, I decided to take a swing at the SX track for fun! Rhythm sections, no issue. Whoops, well I decided to avoid those on my first day (SX whoops are VERY different from AX whoops). Long story short, I WAY over estimated the catapult and ended up overshooting and flat landed… my wrists still feel it a week and a half later. Another awesome fail came when I was working on rhythms through the whoop section on the AX track because they had gotten too beat to consistently blitz every time. Like a typical guy I was getting it down pat, using a mixture of jumping and wheel tapping to make my way through with ease and a lot less energy. Then, I started coming into my first wheel tap with a bit more gusto because I was nailing the corner before. All went well until I started rushing the rhythm… and it was then that I had missed the second wheel tap because of a lapse of judgement and accidentally decided to try and ride a nose wheelie through the rest of the whoop section, which ended in me crashing. Had to walk if off, of course. That helped me learn that when I let “it” come naturally and didn’t rush the track, it allows me to think each step out and adjust in those fraction-of-a-second moments. This also helped me maintain focus and hammer out smooth, consistent laps. Patience is key! Ended up coming away from Greensboro Pro Arenacross with 13th in the AX class, and 15th in the AX Lites. Straight to the AX main event from the heat race, and through some rather determined racing in the AX Lites Last Chance Qualifier I worked my from 5th to 2nd for the last spot for the main. All while keeping these small lessons (along with others) in mind in the process. Not too bad for my first Pro Arenacross race in 2 years with a week of prep! Be sure to keep your eyes for the next entry where I will talk a little more about the mental game in prep and during race day. Click the follow button to get updated when I post new entries! I’ll see you at the races. 2018 Greensboro Arenacross, Lites LCQ, Photo by Mike Vizer Big thanks to Mike Burkeen and Taylor Futrell at SOBMX for having me at the facility and for the words of wisdom that were massively helpful in my prep. Looking forward to going back for the week of the Florence Arenacross and progressing even more and getting better and better! Also, big thanks to Hans and the crew at Xtreme Powersports for getting me in touch with the right people to make the Husqvarna deal happen! Lastly, big thanks to Jeff and his crew at MPR Suspension for getting my suspension set up and returned to me in a bit of a pinch. Thanks to Husqvarna, Xtreme Powersports, TMI Calibration, Race Tech, MPR Suspension, Boyesen, Twisted Development, Fly Racing, EKS Brand, Wiseco, EVS, RoostMX graphics, Acerbis, Dunlop, Bulletproof Threads, Mika Metals, DT1 Filters, MotoSeat, Tamer Billet MX, Evergood Co, and SOBMX. 2018 Greensboro Arenacross, Photo by MEPMX

Scott Meshey 141

Scott Meshey 141

 

Cheers to Cusco

Peter Weiss is a name in the Hard Enduro world that you have most likely heard of. This is the guy that gets contracted by race organizations to build hard enduro race tracks. Look him up sometime...He has a long list of great race courses under his belt. In addition he does enduro schools and exhibitions that usually accompany his travels to various parts of the world. While Peter was in Peru laying out the route for the El Inka Hard Enduro, he wanted to come out to Cusco and do some tourism stuff as well as pack a couple of good days of riding into his
schedule. It was ON! This is what its like to ride the Andes with a pro!

I don't always have the chance to ride with pro level riders like Peter. What I like about it most is that I get a chance to stretch my ability by trying new things. I can't take big risks when riding solo, which is what I do most of the time. So Peter shows up and my buddy Alex and I decide to show him some of what the Andes are all about. Big mountains that stretch up to the 16,000 ft mark just behind my house. He was stoked to give it a go. We rode for two days, covered a bunch of types of terrain, and returned home with huge smiles on our faces.  I will let the video do the talking. This guy likes the routes tight and crazy...He got what he wanted!   Keep your eyes out for Peter Weiss. He puts down some killer GPS tracks for a number of races in South America and other parts of the world.  Check out The El Inka Hard Enduro(ZICK is the race organization) in Peru which takes place around the beginning of December. Peter's route this past race left only a small handful to reach the finish line... Mario Roman took home the prize. I always look forward to riding with Peter.  If you get a chance to take part in an enduro school of his, you won't be disappointed. Enjoy the video and make sure to follow this blog so you can stay tuned to what's happening in the enduro world of Peru...   Wheels down,

Scottiedawg Scott Englund of MotoMission Peru is a social entrepreneur who puts together hard enduro tours in the Andes of Peru. Feel free to contact Scott via this blog, or catch up with him on Facebook at MotoMission Peru. Also, you can see all of his tour videos and more on the official MotoMission Peru Dirtbike Adventures channel on Youtube.
     

scottiedawg

scottiedawg

 

Coach Robb Podcast #8 is Now Available!

Do you want to understand why you are gaining weight even though you are training consistently and watching what you are eating? Want to understand why you feel exhausted all the time? Want to understand why waking up to an alarm is making you gain weight? If so, take a few minutes and listen to my latest podcast and stop the vicious cycle! Tap the "play" arrow below to listen to the podcast and be sure to tap the "Follow" button to be notified when I post new blog entries, right here on ThumperTalk.  

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

The Health & Performance Dangers of Becoming Hungry

Most nutritional and hydration errors occur because the food and water is not readily available. If you are hungry and you don’t have healthy snacks and meals to consume, you will inevitably end up going through a drive through to satisfy your hunger – this is completely different than eating fast food because you don’t care about your health. Speaking of being hungry, this is a sensation that you should NOT be experiencing on a daily basis. When it comes to nutrition for both your health and performance, there are two simple questions that you have to ask yourself: 1. Am I eating fresh fruit, vegetables and high quality fat every two (2) hours? 2. Am I getting hungry before the two (2) hour window of time has transpired? Think about this for a minute, if you are eating nutrient dense fruits, vegetables and protein every two hours (this stabilizes your blood sugar levels along with satisfies your appetite) and you are still getting hungry – YOU NEED TO EAT MORE FOOD! This sounds completely contrary to the mainstream mindset; however, being hungry will undermine your efforts at each workout. Think about your car, if you have a half a tank of gas and you want to drive 1000 miles, you can’t without filling up your gas tank. Your body is the same one but with one extra catch. To improve your workout quality, your brain and muscles need adequate sugar to complete the workout and raise its fitness to the next level. Without the new threshold of workload, the muscles will not be stimulated enough to create an adaptation – the result is a performance plateau. When it comes to determining how much protein, carbohydrates and fats you have to consume refrain from pulling out a scale and reading labels extensively. Instead, focus on your hunger levels (there shouldn’t be any), evaluate your performance results (consistency and improvement) and your biofeedback (quality of sleep, resting heart rate, personality characteristics). If these evaluation elements are not consistently positive, you need to eat more food. If you begin to eat too much (this rarely happens), you will get a clear notice: your clothes will begin to wear tight. Remember, stress comes in many forms: relationship, work, financial, workouts, hydration, hunger, etc. The value of your health and wellnexs is finding the correct balance of volume & intensity of training to maximize your training efforts and achieve your personal goals. Ironically, it all starts with consuming adequate amounts of high quality food, remember it is all about Working Smart, Not Hard! Yours in health and sport, -Coach Robb 

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

Simple Components of Success That You Can Do Today!

To help you get the most from your daily efforts, here are some reminders on how to optimize your training & racing efforts. Eat Prior to Working Out If you eat too soon before you head out, you could be plagued with G.I. (gastro-intestinal) issues. But if your last snack or meal was more than three hours ago, you could run out of energy. The goal is to time your meals & snacks to provide a stabilized blood sugar level throughout your training sessions specific to your intensity levels. Accomplish this by eating every 2 hours after you wake up in the morning. Allow 2 hours after eating a complete meal before exercising – this allows for complete absorption and proper purging avoiding cramping. If you are tight on time, consume 8-10 ounces of Energy Fuel just prior to provide your brain and muscles the easily absorbable carbohydrates and electrolytes necessary for optimum muscle contraction and sweating.   Foam Rolling (please use these videos) Use a foam roller before your workout and/or before working out. The direct pressure helps vasodilate (open up) the tissue bringing fresh blood to the muscles about to be used. When you foam roll prior to stretching, you will reduce the activation of the Stretch Reflex, reducing your risk of a pulled muscle. Chronic aches and pains like Achilles tendinitis, planter fascia, etc. benefit from direct pressure before exercise because it increases blood flow & muscle elasticity. Training is more productive when tender/sore spots are warm. Start by rolling with a tennis ball move to a lacrosse ball then manual massage then sport specific exercise.   Warm Up Your warm up is an activity that allows the body to transition from inactivity to activity and to distribute the blood flow into the extremities. This distribution of blood warms up the muscles, tendons, cartilage and ligaments avoiding any cramping or tearing.   Refuel Immediately after training, your muscles and liver are looking for simple sugar to replenish your storage levels for the next workout. Your window of opportunity is 20-30 minutes after you finish because of an enzyme (glycogen synthase) that is at its highest activity level immediately following exercise. By consuming real food that is easily digestible is the key to optimum replenishment and recovery. By implementing these non sweating performance elements on a daily basis, just adds more tools to help you Work Smart, Not Hard! Yours in health & sport, -Coach Robb     

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

Alpacas in the Crosswalk

Guiding groups of dirtbikers through the Andes of Peru is surreal. First of all, it is a huge privilege to be able to do what I do. I love riding dirtbikes as much as anybody possibly can. Combine that with serving others by leading groups on various trails, providing communication support such as translating a menu, or taking a picture or video to help recall the memory at a later date, these are the things that I do. There are many other tasks as well, but to simplify things, my job isn't much of a job. It's pure joy!
    I always love it when people take a daring step towards something adventurous; Quitting a job to travel, starting a business, becoming a volunteer, adopting a child. This seems to be where life really gets exciting. Most of the people that join me on dirt bike tours are just that...They take the steps that most won't.  I love hanging out with these kinds of peeps.
Recently, a couple of guys got in touch with me about doing a three day ride. One of the guys had a lot of dirtbike experience, but it was a couple of years back. The other, had experience, but it was 25 years back. This poses a challenge for a guy like me who has a duty to my customers to provide a legendary motorcycle experience. How can I mix these two friends up, show them some amazing back country of Peru, and somehow keep them safe, cover the necessary ground to complete the route, and assure them a plethora of smiles? It was a tall order, but I was willing to give it a go.

I asked a lot of questions in order to get to know these guys a bit. Each customer is different and will respond to risk, thrill, fatigue, and stress in various ways. I put a plan together to cover a route that had all the elements to satisfy the more experienced rider, but also have easier options in case anyone was overwhelmed with the trail level. These guys put it all out there. We made it. I pushed their limits, gave them the thrill they were looking for, and had an amazing time getting to know a couple of great fellas.

The whole experience is one that I give to my customers, but I also reap the benefit of the adventure. I often receive the privilege of lighting a flame of dirtbike passion in someone who may have lost it a while back. A few days after the trip, one of the guys let me know he was in the market for a new dirtbike...That's music to my ears.

It's always a tough one to match skills in a group so that everyone can ride at the same level. In fact, it is almost impossible. However, I often deal with the differences. In this case, I used a smaller bike, had various route options, allowed the faster rider the freedom to freeride, and used a lot of flexibility in the plan. By the end of the first day, the lack of the past 25 years of riding became a non issue. A few tips, some verbal encouragement, and a reassurance that our team will make it to the other side was all that was needed. What a thrill it is for me to assist a customer to overcome obstacles on the trail!

Do yourself and another rider a favor by opening up and being that mentor to help a newbie learn what someone taught you. We are all recipients of someone else's experiences. It costs little to share, but opens up a world to those who want to experience what we have.

Make sure to check out the video to see what it's like to ride in the Andes of Peru! Until the next time, keep the wheels down!

Scottiedawg Scott Englund is a seasoned hard enduro guide, explorer, and social entrepreneur living and operating MotoMission Peru in the heart of the Andes of Peru. MotoMission puts together a high end hard enduro tour filled with every kind of amazing you can think of. Contact Scott at Scott@motomissionperu.com to find out more about riding in the Andes.    

scottiedawg

scottiedawg

 

Which of These 3 Things Are Making You Slow?

When it comes to halting a rider’s progress both on and off of the track, nothing will stop you quicker than an injury.  Unfortunately, for many rider’s, we have either become complacent to injuries and have adopted the mindset that “it is just part of the sport” or assumed that the injury is a result of overusing a particular muscle or group of muscles.  With the exception of trauma associated with direct impact, injuries are an imbalance within your performance variables: sleep, food, hydration, training (volume & intensity) and your ability to “absorb” the daily workloads that you subject your body to in an attempt to improve.  As surmised by Dr. Maffetone, injuries fall into three categories: mechanical, chemical & mental.  Let’s review how each of these categories influence the status of your performance.  #1 - Mechanical Injuries Let’s create a scenario. You wake up one morning and when you step out of bed you feel a “slight pull” in the arch of your right foot.  You notice it, but you don’t think much more about it because within a few minutes of walking around the “slight pull” dissipates.  For the next week, every morning when you take your first few steps, you feel the tenderness in your foot lasting progressively longer and instead of being a “slight pull” it is actually becoming painful to walk on it.  This pain is now lasting throughout the day and is beginning to negatively affect your workouts.  As you train, your body senses the pain in the arch of your right foot and counterbalances this pain by shifting the way that you walk, stand and land when you run or walk. You know that you should run on your mid-foot, but it hurts too much, so you begin running by landing on your heel (mechanical mistake) and your body adjusts more of your weight to your left leg, this causes increased load levels on your left side and a domino effect of issues.  Keep in mind, this entire chain of events wasn’t a byproduct of a high impact injury, instead it is your body compensating to some soft tissue issue that resulted in a loss of biomechanics.  The key to avoiding a mechanical injury is a three step process: identify how the problem started, properly address the associated symptoms & implement a system to keep the issue from arising again.  Step One: Identify the Difference between the Pain Site & Pain Source If we continue to use the illustration of your right arch in your foot, let’s say that you purchased a new pair of shoes and they didn’t fit properly for the type of training you are doing.  Your left foot (notice the opposite side of the foot that hurts) gets tweaked during exercise which results in micro trauma (small tears in the muscle & connective tissue).  While there are no symptoms (swelling, hot to the touch, etc.), this micro trauma is sensed by the brain and is immediately addressed with compensation – you shift your body weight from being equally distributed with both feet, to more weight being distributed to your right foot (the eventual site of your pain, but not source of the problem). This distribution of more body weight to the right side of the body puts more loads on the bones and muscles which creates a “secondary compensation”; an excessive amount of load that has to be distributed to keep you upright and able to walk.  This excessive load eventually weakens (because of fatigue) both the primary and secondary muscles become so tight (part of the compensation process), flexibility is limited and movement is creating micro tears in the tissue that your brain picks up as pain.  When this point of the process is achieved, the muscles are like a tight guitar string and the slightest movement ends up being the “action” that you feel – a muscle tear or chronic tenderness.  Solution: find an experienced human performance coach or physical therapist who understands movement associated with your specific sport to help you identify the source of your pain. If you can’t move without pain, you will never be able to achieve your full potential. Step Two: address the symptoms.  It is not a rational thought to think that you can correct pain by acting as if it isn’t there – sometimes this means taking some time off!  The therapy needed for dealing with symptoms needs to begin with the cause of the pain in the first place.  In the illustration of your right foot, you need to source the problem all the way back to a poor fitting shoe that didn’t support your training efforts.  Once you are put into the correct shoes, the body will cease making adaptations and compensations – this is the critical step to dealing with the painful symptoms.   The body has an incredible natural ability to heal itself once the cause of the problem is properly addressed.  As a general rule of thumb, if the injury is acute (you have felt the pain for the first time within the last 48 hours), then apply ice for 10 minutes and then air temperature and manual massage for 10 minutes.  If the symptom has persisted for more than 48 hours, apply ice for 10 minutes, moist heat for 10 minutes and air temperature/massage for 10 minutes.  Repeat as many times as logistically possible.   Step Three: Prevent the Cycle of Pain Before it begins Most racers are able to narrow down the source of an injury quite quickly when questioned.  For example, if I ask an athlete how old their shoes are, they are able to tell me that they are 8 months old and not very comfortable to wear.  They have literally narrowed down the source of the problem with just a few questions.  The problem arises when racers ignore their body’s feedback relevant to pain and not make the necessary (usually easy) adjustments to keep the symptoms from getting worse.  When your body provides you an obvious signal – tenderness in your foot for example, stop and ask yourself what is actually going on.  If you don’t stop, rest and evaluate what conditions have led to this situation, you will be eventually forced to stop resulting in more down time from riding & racing.    #2 Chemical Injuries – Epstein Barr/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome The typical racer spends most of his or her spare time riding, cross training, working/school and spending time with your family & friends.  Riding & cross training is as common as eating lunch each day.  However, you may notice that it is getting progressively harder to get through a workout or a race feeling strong.  Additional symptoms may include irritability, weight gain, craving simple sugar, not sleeping well and getting ill frequently.  Though this may not be as “painful” as a mechanical injury, you are chemically injured.  Although some chemical injuries may provide symptoms of inflammation, which can be painful, the most common characteristic of a chemical problem is that you feel tired and fatigue quickly when training and/or racing. To properly address chemical injuries, you must first rule out more serous conditions such as anemia (low red blood cell levels), infections or other disorders.  To help narrow this condition quickly, a full panel blood test, evaluation of family history and a physical exam by a professional should be performed every three months. A personal schedule that is spread too thin creates an environment where the ability to recover completely is hindered and the stress level placed on your adrenal system becomes excessive.  Your adrenal system is designed to adapt and compensate for all the stress that you subject your body to on a daily and weekly basis.  With your adrenals not being able to sustain your stress levels, your bodily functions begin to decline.  Symptoms include: Ø  Blood sugar becomes unstable leading to fatigue Ø  The brain is deprived of the necessary sugar it needs, cravings & increased hunger follows.  Ø  Irritability - because the brain is sensitive to relatively small changes in blood sugar Ø  Weight Gain – stress slows down your metabolism which causes your body to shift from using more sugar and less fat for fuel which leads weight gains Ø  Suppressed immune system – this leads to frequent illness and lingering sickness Ø  Allergies become more common & severe Solution: clean up your personal schedule so that you are doing exactly what you have outlined in your personal schedule to maximize your mental focus and overall productivity.  Additionally, add more high quality fat to satisfy your appetite and fuel your body with high quality MCT (medium chain triglycerides) for energy.    #3 - Mental Injuries As stated by Dr. Maffetone, “a chemical may trigger impairment on a mental or emotional level.” If the brain becomes distorted from a chemical effect of diet, nutrition, excessive training volume or intensity, a mental injury can occur.   Symptoms include: Depression Low desire to train Fearing competition High levels of anxiety Personal life and balance becoming stressful Decreased performance results (even with more effort being put into training) A functional imbalance in the brain’s chemistry is a change in two neurotransmitters: Serotonin & Norepinephrine.  The brain’s imbalance may be caused by a mismatched diet, lack of nutrients, or training too hard, too long or too often.  Serotonin has a calming, sedative, or depressing effect in the brain.  A high carbohydrate (high glycemic) meal, results in more serotonin production.  Norepinephrine has a stimulating effect on the brain.  A racer who is depressed could benefit from more of this brain chemical. Overtraining frequently is preceded by too much anaerobic work.  Anaerobic work creates excessive lactic acid which has been shown to create depression, anxiety and phobias amongst racers.  The catalyst for this is an overstimulation of the adrenal glands, and occurs with the release of endorphins. 
  Conclusion The key to optimum performance is to think through how the problems were created and implement a specific process to pull you out of the negative environment and into an environment that yields optimum health, wellness and ultimately performance.  Each injury needs to be seen as part of the racer and each racer must be approached individually based on age, experience, status of the injury, how the body responds to therapy and overall goals.  Finally, step back and review this entire process.  It has taken weeks, maybe months, for your injury to get to the point where you stop and address the issue with therapy.  And all along this process, your body has not been healthy and your performance has been negatively affected.   Next issue we will discuss: The Anatomy of an Injury: Knees & Ankles.  If you have any questions or need anything clarified, please email me directly.  Until next time, Train Smart-Not Hard! -Coach Robb

About MotoE and Complete Racing Solutions MotoE-CompleteRacingSolutions.com (the world’s largest and most successful moto specific Human Performance Company) is a complete Motocross Performance Training company with a vision of developing good racers into championship level racers through proven nutrition, mental, fitness and performance programs. MotoE currently manages the nutrition, mental, speed, strength and endurance programs for Ricky Carmichael’s GOAT Farm, the Georgia Training Facility (GPF) and WildwoodMX - with more partnerships to be announced in 2018. Led by Head Coach and Founder, Robb Beams, MotoE offers 33 years of success including four-time supercross and three-time motocross champion Ryan Dungey, and current pro riders Jeremy Martin, Adam Ciancirulio, Alex Martin, Isaac Teasdale, Tristan Charboneau and Mitchell Harrison.  Current top amateur riders developed by MotoE’s Performance & Nutritional Program include Jordan Bailey, Lance Kobush, Jake Pinhancos, Stilez Robertson, Joshua Guffey and Dylan Greer.   If you are frustrated with "gusessing" what to do or why your performance levels are below your expectations, contact MotoE's Customer Service department and request a FREE 20 minute consultation with Coach Robb to see what can be done to get you to that next level of fitness and performance.      

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

The Two Stroke Dirt Bike Engine Building Handbook is Here!

In today's post, I'm very excited to share details about my new book,The Two Stroke Dirt Bike Engine Building Handbook. As with all of my blogs and technical resources, my goal has been to bring riders clear and concise technical information. My two-stroke book exemplifies this and puts nearly 300 pages of engine building knowledge at your fingertips.

I wroteThe Two Stroke Dirt Bike Engine Building Handbook to be an all-encompassing guide on engine building. From the moment there is doubt about the engine's overall condition to the time the rebuilt engine is broken in, I give you a step-by-step guide to help you work towards a successful build. My aim was to create a definitive resource that hit on all the relevant topics you'll encounter as you proceed through an engine build and take any guesswork out of the equation.

Throughout the book, engineering knowledge and practical experience are fused together to detail the how and why behind the way procedures are performed, parts are designed, and engine performance is affected. This is the most important and valuable aspect of the book, and it's something you won't find in a service manual. The book doesn't just tell you to bolt part A to part B, it teaches and explains the correct way assembly procedures should be performed and why it is necessary to do so. It also explains the intricate relationship between parts, where to look for wear patterns, and shows examples of worn and damaged components.



If you're interested in making modifications to your engine or if you're curious about how certain modifications affect performance, I wrote an entire chapter dedicated to the subject. Within this chapter a discussion on how performance parts such as expansion chambers, port timing modifications, and cylinder heads alter overall engine performance is included and helpful suggestions are provided to aid you in choosing the correct components for your build, depending on your specific riding needs.

If you have a thirst to learn more about how your engine works and a desire to correctly disassemble or assemble an engine to professional standards, you will benefit greatly from this book. Whether a complete beginner or a seasoned builder, with nearly 300 pages and 250 images worth of information, there is fresh and useful knowledge for everyone. There is also valuable material packed into this handbook that doesn't just pertain to the act of building the engine. I include instruction on diagnosing engine problems, sourcing and determining which parts to replace, using precision measuring tools, setting up your workshop, and additional tests and inspections that should be performed when preparing racing engines. If you just want to build your engine back up to stock spec, you are covered. If you want to go the extra mile and prepare a racing engine, you are also covered. In a way, this book allows you to choose your own ending by giving you all the tools and knowledge you need to complete your build at whatever level you decide. As a way to thank you for your support, we're offering TT members 15% off during a special TT pre-sale which runs from now until December 5th (when the book officially launches). Simply follow this link to learn more and order: ThumperTalk Pre-Sale

Thanks again for all your support as we've grown DIY Moto Fix from an idea to a thriving community of riders who are passionate about making their machines perform better through their own hard work. Thanks for reading and have a great week. -Paul    

Paul Olesen

Paul Olesen

 

MOTOE IS EXPANDING AND HAS $156,000 IN SPONSORSHIP AVAILABLE FOR THE 2018 AMATEUR RACING SEASON!

MotoE is once again opening and expanding its amateur racing sponsorship program for the 2018 race season beginning November 20th2017.   Due to the success of both the MotoE Factory and Co-Factory Teams experienced in 2017, the 2018 sponsorship program will double in size and continue to consist of two levels of sponsorship: Full Factory & Co-Factory. Each rider chosen for the MotoE Factory Team (total of 6 riders) will receive 100% of their coaching fees covered (a $10,000 annual value) along with significant discounts on Coach Robb’s Nutritionally Green performance nutrition products including his extremely popular Energy Fuel.  MotoE Co-Factory Team members (total of 20 riders) will receive 80% off their coaching fees covered (a $4,800 annual value), as well as discounts on Coach Robb’s nutrition products. Both Factory and Co-Factory Teams are being doubled in size for the 2018 season.  “Last season we received just over 2200 resumes for our Co-Factory Team so we wanted to expand our sponsorship level to provide more riders the opportunity to gain access to our championship proven nutritional, performance and mental programs used by some of today’s top professionals and amateur national champions,” states MotoE Founder and Director of Human Performance Services, Robb Beams.  "In 2017 the MotoE Factory team consisting of Jake Pinhancos, Joshua Gibbs and Stilez Robertson who dedicated themselves to the program resulted in multiple championships, as well as performances that were far above what we had projected for the 2017 race season,” commented Beams. "Our Co-Factory Team development vision was to improve the rider’s strength, endurance and overall speed to make them eligible for the MotoE Factory Team and ultimately a factory ride with a reputable team,” he added.  This vison became reality when long time team member Isaac Teasdale was recently signed to the Babbitt’s/Monster Kawasaki AX Lites Team for the 2018 season. “Our focus again in 2018 is to provide amateur riders all over the world access to the same MotoE Blueprint of Success Performance Program that was created and implemented with our top amateurs and professionals over the last 33 years. Improving the rider’s speed, strength, endurance, flexibility, lean body mass and mental preparation to handle the physical and mental demands of high profile amateur racing will continue to be our focus,” says Beams. Applications will be reviewed and accepted thru December 29th 2017. Riders will be notified of their sponsorship level by January 5th2018 and will begin receiving their MotoE Blueprint for Success Performance Program the week of January 8th 2018. If you are dedicated to doing what is necessary to be a top amateur racer and possibly an amateur national champion (in any class), submit your updated race resume and 2018 race schedule for review to Contact@CoachRobb.com. No matter what class you race, where you race, or your past results, all resumes will be reviewed! MotoE (the world’s largest and most successful Human Performance Company) is a complete Motocross Performance Training company with a vision of developing good racers into championship level racers through proven nutrition, mental, fitness and performance programs. Led by Head Coach and Founder, Robb Beams, MotoE offers 33 years of success including four-time supercross and three-time motocross champion Ryan Dungey, and current pro riders Jeremy Martin, Adam Ciancirulio, Alex Martin, Isaac Teasdale, Tristan Charboneau and Mitchell Harrison.  Current top amateur riders developed by MotoE’s Performance & Nutritional Program include Jordan Bailey, Lance Kobush, Jake Pinhancos, Stilez Robertson, Joshua Guffey and Dylan Greer. For more information, visit www.CompleteRacingSolutions.com

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

Coach Robb Podcast #6 - Now Available!

During this show I answered the frequently debated question – “Should my maximum heart rate go up or down as I become fitter?” I also outlined what an Energy Matrix is and how training with a heart rate monitor will make you leaner, stronger and faster in the shortest amount of time. In addition to answering more listener questions, I also explained why strength training is a key component to improving your ability to burn fat, increase speed and reduce muscular fatigue. When you get a moment, make sure to follow me over on Youtube at Robb Beams to hear your questions answered in video format! Click here to download: https://www.dmxsradio.com/ Yours in health and sport, -Coach Robb 

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

The Evergood Open Experience

Hello ThumperTalk readers! I have to say that of all the things I write about, I enjoy writing about going to races that are put on by great companies to recognize the unrecognized talent. Recently, I made the trip to such a race in Iowa, called the Evergood Open at Oak Ridge MX, and I’m here to tell you about it. I will admit, I have a certain level of bias when it comes to races like the Evergood Open or the MX Reunion races, because it was through the Vurb Classic in 2012 at Echeconnee that I was recognized for my never-quit pursuit of a W against some stiff competition. Through the help I received from Race Tech because of the recognition and my performances at other Vurb Classic events and amateur nationals, I’ve brought myself to where I am now, and that’s not something I take lightly. Being brutally honest, the top level of support in the motocross industry is a tight nit group and it is hard to break into without solid results. These events give those who truly need the help the opportunity to get the help they need to make their journey to the top a possibility. Hats off to the companies who participate in these events that are giving deserving riders the opportunity to succeed, because that’s truly what you’re doing. 2013 Vurb Classic @ MX207 The staff at Evergood Co truly put on a great event that I will not soon forget. Not only did some great riders get recognized, but the event was held at possibly the coolest track I’ve ever been on. Also, the event was just plain fun! It wasn’t super high stakes, and instead was laid back and all about everyone having a good time. Everything from the track, to the people, environment, and activities after racing made the event feel like the drive was paid back in spades. Evergood Open @ Oak Ridge MX, photo by Jordan Hoover at Evergood Co Whether we realize it or not, if you’re a racer who competes for money or the goal of making a career of it, we get so sucked into the winning mindset that we forget that there’s more fun in motocross (or whatever you race) than just winning. One thing that I found super fun about the Evergood Open was the holeshot competition! It was intense… and I was genuinely concerned when I saw a 1200cc BMW flat-track bike pull up. However, I did end up winning on the 250f! If winning it wasn’t cool enough, interviews and popping a champagne bottle is icing on the cake to top off a good day of racing on a great track! I also think it’s great for the spectators, being able to see more than just racing, and it creates a great atmosphere for everyone. I mean, who doesn’t love watching people bang bars off a start for $100 all while playing some AC/DC? Evergood Open @ Oak Ridge MX, photo by Jordan Hoover at Evergood Co Another great thing about the Evergood Open was being able to meet different people, including those that we look up to. Over the weekend I got to meet Jeff Emig and Jason Anderson… not during a schedule; just walk up and started talking. Being able to chat a bit to people you look up to and get their perspectives and simply listen to what they have to say about a track is priceless. Being able to talk to Emig one-on-one about his ideology towards racing and explaining why he maneuvers the track like he does creates a new perspective that can be utilized if implemented correctly into your own personal riding style. Evergood Open @ Oak Ridge MX, photo by Jordan Hoover at Evergood Co Overall, great time at a great track that will have me coming back next year! Hats off to the whole Evergood Co crew, as well as everyone at Oak Ridge MX, y’all killed it!   Be sure to stay tuned to the blog series and click/tap the “follow” button to stay updated on any new entries! You can also click the “follow” button on my profile to stay updated with anything I post on ThumperTalk. Thanks for following along, I’ll see you at the races!

Scott Meshey 141

Scott Meshey 141

 

Are You Absorbing Your Workouts or Wearing Yourself Out?

As you capture more and more historical data, you are able to catch any deviations in your body’s ability to adapt to the stress of training. By consistently tracking your daily resting heart rate you are able to “catch” signs of fatigue, stress and even illness early and adjust your training accordingly to minimize the grip of the virus or stress. As a general rule of thumb, if your resting heart rate is up 3-5 beats over last week’s average, you need to keep your workouts strictly aerobic (this means NO weight lifting – it is anaerobic) and the duration to less than a hour. If your heart rate is up 6 beats or more over last week’s average, you need to go back to bed (if logistically possible) and use your normal “training time” as “recovery time”. Use this “recovery time” for eating, stretching and mental development – the non-sweating performance elements of your program. It is always better to give up one or two days of training then to “push through the stress or virus” only to be set back 7-10 days. Please keep in mind that an elevated heart rate associated with high intensity/volume training is normal and is part of the adaptation process when supported with proper amounts of food & sleep. The key is to evaluate how your body “absorbs” such a workout. By listening to your body and following your bio-feedback (resting heart rate, body weight and quality of sleep) provides you direct feedback that what you are doing (training and recovery wise) is working. Remember, Work Smart - Not Hard! -Coach Robb

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

How The Two-Stroke Exhaust System Works

In my last post, I shared details about how the two-stroke cylinder works, in today's post I want to provide an overview of how a performance two-stroke engine's exhaust system works.
 
Adding a performance exhaust system can be a great way to increase power and/or alter the power delivery of an engine. I would also argue that optimizing a two-stroke engine’s exhaust system is equally as important as ensuring the cylinder’s ports are correctly designed for the given application. Not all exhaust systems are designed to do the same things, and much like cylinder port design, exhaust designs are intended to alter power in specific ways. Having a basic understanding of how an exhaust system works can go a long way when it comes to selecting the right exhaust pipe for your engine.

Two-stroke exhaust design is complicated and there are many different variables that must be considered when designing a pipe. I don’t intend to go into all of them, but I will share a few of the most critical.
  Each time the exhaust port opens to release spent combustion gases, pressure pulses are created. Modern pipe designs harness this pulse energy and use it to help scavenge and fill the cylinder. The process starts when a positive pressure pulse is created once the exhaust port opens and combustion gases leave the cylinder. The positive pulse travels down the pipe until it reaches the diffuser, at which point part of the pulse is inverted and reflected back towards the cylinder as a negative wave. This negative wave is very beneficial in pulling spent exhaust gases out of the cylinder and fresh mixture up through the transfer ports. The remaining positive pulse continues on its journey towards the end of the pipe where it encounters the reflector. The reflector acts as the name implies and forces the positive pulse back towards the exhaust port. Once reflected back, the pulse remains positive and, if the pipe is designed correctly, will reach the exhaust port just as the piston is about to close off the port on the compression stroke at the desired RPM for maximum power. Any fresh mixture which has escaped out the cylinder will be forced back in by the positive pressure pulse.

The tuned length of the pipe is dictated by the exhaust port timing, RPM of max power, and the speed of sound. Pulse length and amplitude are governed by the angles of the diffuser and reflector. Generally, steeper cone angles create pulses with more amplitude but shorter duration. Shallower angles generate pulses with less amplitude but longer duration. Given these variables, it is easy to see how a pipe could be tailored for specific applications. An engine converted for road racing may utilize a pipe designed for peak power which incorporates steep diffuser and reflector cone angles so that pulse amplitude is not sacrificed. This peak power would likely come at the expense of a narrowed range of power. An engine tailored for woods riding may feature a pipe with shallower cone angles, resulting in less pulse amplitude, but a broader spread of power.  

The last parameter I want to touch on is how the tailpipe, which is sometimes referred to as the stinger, influences the pipe. The tailpipe creates a flow restriction in the pipe which allows the pipe to have a certain amount of back pressure. Enlarge the tailpipe and the back pressure decreases, make it smaller and the back pressure increases. As back pressure increases or decreases, so does temperature and ultimately the speed of sound. As the speed of sound changes, so does the resonance RPM of the pipe. If the tailpipe is sized too small, cylinder scavenging will be inhibited. When this happens, the cylinder, fresh mixture, and piston will all be overheated.

While engineers and tuners can estimate starting pipe dimensions and tuned lengths, a great deal of trial and error testing is usually still necessary to fine tune the exhaust pipe and optimize the design. Unless you intend on building your own exhausts, this work will have already been done for you. When selecting an exhaust system, you need to focus on how the exhaust alters the power curve. Exhaust systems are tailored to deliver more bottom end performance, top-end performance, or performance throughout the power curve. Selecting which system is right for you will depend on how you want your engine to perform. If you’ve chosen to modify your cylinder ports, installing an exhaust system that compliments the porting can be very beneficial. You might be wondering about slip-on mufflers. If you’ve followed along with my explanation of how exhaust pipes work, you’ll notice I made no mention of the muffler. While the muffler can have a small effect on performance, it is not the primary factor. Upgrading a muffler is a good way to reduce weight, but there won’t be a slip-on out there which significantly increases power, in the same way, a properly designed expansion chamber can. I hope you enjoyed this write-up on key features affecting the performance of two-stroke cylinders. As for Two Stroke Handbook news, we received our first printed proof of the book this week! Needless to say, we are inching closer and closer to an official release date. To stay updated on The Two Stroke Dirt Bike Engine Building Handbook we created an email sign up for our readers. Click this link to sign up, see the new cover, the Table of Contents, and some sneak peek pages right from the book. Thanks for reading and have a great rest of your week! -Paul

Paul Olesen

Paul Olesen

 

Should You Workout Hard This Weekend or Take Some Down Time?

Over Training Indicators include: mood swings; craving of simple sugar; interrupted sleep; loss of libido; loss of body weight; suppressed appetite & elevated resting heart rate. Once you have reached the point of over training and are experiencing associated symptoms, your satisfaction associated with training becomes less rewarding and ultimately affects other elements in your life (relationships, work, etc.) along with having a negative effect on your performance (which ironically makes you think you need to do more or work harder!). Training creates adaptations within the body's various systems (muscular, cardio-pulmonary, lymphatic, nervous and connective) and needs to be supported with rest and food for positive adaptations. Inadequate amounts (and quality) of sleep and food set the body up for a physical break down which leads to negative effects on the body (i.e. suppressed immune system and muscles with less power and endurance). In addition to adaptations within the body's systems, training causes changes at a cellular level. Dr. Sandler notes that cell mitochondria swell, metabolic wastes accumulate, essential nutrients (particularly electrolytes and stored glycogen) deplete, and muscle tissue is torn. This tearing is known as micro trauma of the cells, and torn muscle tissue doesn't work efficiently. As popularly noted, it takes 48 hours for the body to recover from this micro-trauma and has to be supported with rest and food for proper recovery and improved overall health. If your body doesn't get the opportunity to rebuild from the "work phase" of training, overall health and associated performance begin to slow down (and in extreme circumstances, cease all together). The concept of hard training days followed with easy-active recovery days incorporated into your weekly training schedule establishes the balance necessary for incremental improvements in your overall health and ultimately your performance. Consistent training without physical or mental setbacks provides the foundation for your body to absorb larger volumes of training. The larger the foundation (i.e. quality of overall health) the quicker you will recover from workouts and the quicker your body will progress to the next level of health & ultimately performance. Think about it this way, if you are not fresh, you will not have the energy (or desire) to push to the next level of performance. If your body doesn't experience the next level you will begin to stagnate within your performance cycles. So what will it be this weekend - big workout or some down time to recover? Yours in sport and health, -Coach Robb  

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

Anybody wanna race hard enduro in Peru?

Hard enduro has really developed rapidly here in Peru. In fact, it was just a few years ago when the first, what I would call legit race was held. The El Inka Hard Enduro entered the stage with a bang. After Jorge Nieto and Branko Bozovich of Lima, spent some time traveling around the world to participate in some of the hard enduro favorites like Romaniacs, Sea to Sky, Avandarocks, Ukupacha and so on, they decided to take a shot and organize the first hard enduro race in Peru under the umbrella of ZICK, a company founded with the purpose of developing hard enduro in Peru. This is the 2016 Race Video...Check it out!   The courage to chase down the idea came after some big names like Cyril Despres, Gio Sala, Chris Birch and Martin Freinademetz came to Peru and stated what Jorge and Branko had known for a while: Peru has some of the most amazing terrain for hard enduro in the world.

In order to obtain a world class track for El Inka Hard Enduro they contacted Peter Weiss, a popular name in Hard Enduro, he came out and developed the route along with the local knowledge provided by Zick. This guy knows how to build a race course! The race was held in San Bartolo, which is a cool desert riding area just south of Peru's capital city of Lima. The race brought in some good talent. An entourage of riders from Lima wanted to give it a go. In addition, a handful of guys from Mexico came down and if I recall, a rider from Equator. A Spaniard living in Peru, throw me in there to represent the US, and there you have it...the birth of an amazing international hard enduro race event. There were about 85 racers if I recall. The race was as organized as anything I have ever seen in Peru. I was pleasantly surprised as it exceeded my expectations. The prologue was a fun obstacle riddled course on the beach in Lima. Great for the spectators to enjoy, a challenge for the riders to make it around especially as the tide came in, and a convenient place for an event to bring the new sport to light. Fast forward one year to the second El Inka and we found the likes of Kyle Redmond and Cory Graffunder. The reigning champ from Mexico, Didier "Frodo" Goirand also came back to defend his title. This time Jorge and Branko developed a track that was basically drawn out in Google Earth and supported by their "weekend warrior" knowledge of the area. For year two, they brought Peter Weiss and his buddy Mike Skinner to put the final touches on the route. They spent countless hours marking trails and figuring out ways to destroy the riders...It was perfect. Just what we were all wanting...another impossible route with a super slim chance of making it to the finish.
The prologue was bigger, better, and devoured a few more riders this time. Each rider got to take two separate laps to qualify for the semi, then the top eight of the sixteen in the semis raced for a cash prize and choice of starting position for the following day.  Again, the prologue was a fantastic spectator event that is just fun for anyone to watch, let alone someone that likes motorcycles.
The second day was a three lap time trial. The course was intermediate in level and about 15 miles. Each rider took at least one lap. If satisfied with their time, they could bow out. If not, there were two more chances to better their position. Day two's results determined the starting line-up for the final day.
Day three was the big race. The first dozen positions started seconds apart, then paired up two at a time until all the riders were on the course. The course was laid out in four sections. The first was Iron/Acero which was the easiest level. Some of the riders had it in mind to reach the end of the Iron/Acero section and that would be a success. Then came the Bronze/Bronce section. The technical level went up and began to create some traffic and chaos on the course. After the Bronze/Bronce section was the Silver/Plata section. This was the part that took out most of the field. Many good riders threw in the towel during this phase or at the final silver checkpoint. Gold/Oro, was a hideous mix of obstacles intended to test the best of the riders. Only a handful made it into this section. An even smaller number made it to the end. Of course, the winner was the one who reached the finish line first after completing all the stages. Cory Graffunder came out on top. It was another successful year for the El Inka Hard Enduro.   Year three is coming up. December 1-2 will be the 3rd annual El Inka Hard Enduro. Sounds like Kyle Redmond is coming back, Cory Graffunder will be defending his title and another name from the States will show up: Mitch Carvolth. Mario Roman will take a shot at the El Inka Hard Enduro if Sherco manages to get a bike in Peru. Still waiting on some other big names, but I am sure this race is here to stay. The World Hard Enduro Series has put the El Inka as their final race of the series this year. That alone, should draw some more riders from around the world. Peter Weiss will be managing the course once again. He also puts on a great enduro school during the few weeks prior to the race.
The whole thing seems to be building a lot of momentum. The riders in Peru are moving up in the ranks of hard enduro. Nine riders from Peru went to Romaniacs this year. Thats a huge number! It's really cool to see the sport taking off like it is in a place like Peru. I am convinced there is no better place to ride than the Andes. Keep your eyes out for more big news from Peru...It's certainly worthy of being put on the international enduro map. If you are interested in the El Inka Hard Enduro, check out the organization  ZICK on Facebook as well as the El Enka Hard Enduro Facebook page. I can't wait to tackle this beast again!   Now I gotta go out and train! Scottiedawg
  About Scottie
Scott Englund is a social entrepreneur operating hard enduro tours in the Andes of Peru. All of the profits from the business are used to support a number of social projects in the Cusco region of the country. You can best find him on the MotoMission Peru Facebook page or email at Scott@motomissionperu.com. Also, check out the Youtube channel at MotoMission Peru Dirtbike Adventures to see what  tour in the Andes looks like.    

scottiedawg

scottiedawg

 

MotoE-Coach Robb Newsletter

The October MotoE-Coach Robb Newsletter is now available for download.  CLICK HERE and learn: 1. Planning for the 2018 season of riding and racing. 2. How much fluid should you consume on a daily basis? 3. How to build lean muscle mass? 4. Why you are exercising but still gaining weight?  5 How to deal with post race depression. 6. Difference between a pain site and a pain source.  7. The importance of building an aerobic base. If you would like to receive Coach Robb's newsletter monthly in your email, please visit CompleteRacingSolutions.com and subscribe at the top of the landing page.   Yours in sport and health, -Coach Robb Note: If the link above doesn't work for you, please copy and paste the following into your browser: http://conta.cc/2gkBdVZ  

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

hydration Hydration Relevant to Performance

Frequently I discuss the importance of proper hydration and nutrition as it relates to building and repairing muscle tissue, burning unwanted body fat and consuming enough water, sugar and electrolytes to perform optimally every day when you head out the door. With this in mind, I want you to begin keeping a very detailed analysis of your sweat rate. Nutrition as it relates to performance is an interesting subject; we look at the quality and quantity of your food intake and evaluate if you have enough energy to finish your workouts feeling strong throughout the duration of the workout. If you begin to fatigue, we know that we need to adjust the quantity (we assume that the quality is there at this point). Now let’s take a detailed look at your hydration as it relates to your performance. Proper hydration is going to affect your body in two ways: one, it helps you regulate your core body temperature. The cooler you are from the inside out, the better you will perform. The second benefit to proper hydration is that your muscles (and brain) are receiving enough water, electrolytes and sugar to perform properly: good mental clarity and strong muscle contractions. To improve your confidence on race day, you need to know what your sweat/replenishment rate is specific to your intensity with the factor of temperature & humidity. Though it sounds tedious during the week, it is invaluable on race day – you will know exactly what your hydration strategy to implement to race up to your fullest potential. Until next time, work smart - not hard! -Coach Robb

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

Riding Rutted Corners

Hey ThumperTalkers, checkout my latest off-road motorcycle riding video tip on the proper techniques necessary to navigate rutted corners with speed, control, and confidence. Of course, if you have any questions, hit me up in the comment section below and I'll do my best to answer. Please be patient, I'm at the track and events a lot, but I'll do what I can! How would you rate your skills in tackling rutted corners? What's giving you the most trouble?   Brian Garrahan
http://garrahanoffroadtraining.com/


 
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