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  • Coach Robb

    Simple Components of Success That You Can Do Today!

    By Coach Robb

    To help you get the most from your daily efforts, here are some reminders on how to optimize your training & racing efforts. Eat Prior to Working Out If you eat too soon before you head out, you could be plagued with G.I. (gastro-intestinal) issues. But if your last snack or meal was more than three hours ago, you could run out of energy. The goal is to time your meals & snacks to provide a stabilized blood sugar level throughout your training sessions specific to your intensity levels. Accomplish this by eating every 2 hours after you wake up in the morning. Allow 2 hours after eating a complete meal before exercising – this allows for complete absorption and proper purging avoiding cramping. If you are tight on time, consume 8-10 ounces of Energy Fuel just prior to provide your brain and muscles the easily absorbable carbohydrates and electrolytes necessary for optimum muscle contraction and sweating.   Foam Rolling (please use these videos) Use a foam roller before your workout and/or before working out. The direct pressure helps vasodilate (open up) the tissue bringing fresh blood to the muscles about to be used. When you foam roll prior to stretching, you will reduce the activation of the Stretch Reflex, reducing your risk of a pulled muscle. Chronic aches and pains like Achilles tendinitis, planter fascia, etc. benefit from direct pressure before exercise because it increases blood flow & muscle elasticity. Training is more productive when tender/sore spots are warm. Start by rolling with a tennis ball move to a lacrosse ball then manual massage then sport specific exercise.   Warm Up Your warm up is an activity that allows the body to transition from inactivity to activity and to distribute the blood flow into the extremities. This distribution of blood warms up the muscles, tendons, cartilage and ligaments avoiding any cramping or tearing.   Refuel Immediately after training, your muscles and liver are looking for simple sugar to replenish your storage levels for the next workout. Your window of opportunity is 20-30 minutes after you finish because of an enzyme (glycogen synthase) that is at its highest activity level immediately following exercise. By consuming real food that is easily digestible is the key to optimum replenishment and recovery. By implementing these non sweating performance elements on a daily basis, just adds more tools to help you Work Smart, Not Hard! Yours in health & sport, -Coach Robb     
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    • 1,802 views
  • scottiedawg

    C'mon Dad!

    By scottiedawg

    Over the course of my time operating MotoMission Peru, I have had various opportunities to host/guide dirt bike adventures with other riders. I have a special place in my heart for father/son adventures. I guess it must have something to do with the sentiment I have with my dad.   Official MotoMission Tour Video...Check the others on our Youtube Channel   Dirtbikes and Dads go together When Tony and Joran contacted me about doing a tour, my excitement level rose. A father/son combo with limited dirt bike experience would be a challenge, but a welcome one. I normally cater to seasoned riders, but his one would put a different pressure on me as the guide. I needed to push these guys to their limits, while completing a route within our time frame of four days. The terrain needed to fit both the skill level and the distance we needed to cover each day. The fellas wanted to roll their tires over some amazing parts of Peru, get some mind blowing pics,  and live to tell about it. A face with a smile tells a story My work was cut out for me. I put Joran on a crf 230 because of his size and experience. Dad, Tony, was on the Husky 300, I rode a Honda 450x. I figured I could swap out with one of them if I needed. Bike selection worked out perfectly. The route itself was ideal. It was a mix of single track, some rough two track, and some free ride(go where ever you want) type of stuff. It was perfect to try a hand at hill climbs, scare oneself silly on rock fixtures, and put the tires on the edge of mountain ledges to make the heart flutter a bit. The ride was fantastic. Tony and Joran both expanded their riding level to new heights. In fact, I was able to coach the guys on various little riding tricks that someone showed me along my journey.  Stand up more, focus eyes on where you want to go,  as well as some mechanics of body positioning and how it relates to traction and control. It was a bit of a seminar/riding school/test day. No doubt that the guys are better riders now. I thoroughly enjoyed that part of the tour.

    The view they wanted to see!
      When it all boils down, we had a fantastic four days of riding. Each were pushed to the limit various times each day. When the heads hit the pillows each night, it took no time for the sleep to begin.  Smiles were abundant, and there were no shortages of whoops, hollars, and high fives.

    Certainly another successful tour!   MotoMission Peru is a social enterprise operated by Scott Englund. If you want to see the Andes via dirtbike, this is how to do it. High quality in every aspect. Service, guide, routes, equipment, and overall experience cannot be beat. Contact Scott via Thumpertalk messaging or at scott@motomissionperu.com for more information.
    • 3 comments
    • 1,980 views
  • Garrahan Off-Road Training

    Video Riding Tip: Stand Up Cornering Techniques

    By Garrahan Off-Road Training

    Often times, stand up cornering is the best body positioning. In this training video I walk you through the correct techniques for stand up cornering and why they are important. Give it a watch and see how you're doing.  Thanks for watching! Brian Garrahan
    Garrahan Off-Road Training
     
    • 12 comments
    • 10,482 views
  • Scott Meshey 141

    Preparation: The Effort

    By Scott Meshey 141

    Hello ThumperTalk readers! Welcome to the second entry of my blog series, following my journey exiting the amateur ranks into pro status. For more information about the blog series, check out the first entry, The Beginning of the Journey. For now, I’ll be taking a dip into my approach to the Loretta Lynn’s qualification process and preparing myself for regionals and forward.  In the past, I’ve had a bit of a “just wing it” approach to what I did as far as racing went. While it has garnered me some success, it does not yield what I am truly capable of. Before I was released by my doctor to come back to racing, my family and I made the decision that we would change things up a bit. Of course, changes in plans isn’t uncharacteristic in a sport where there isn’t a whole lot that is certain. Like any racer, sometimes we have to switch up our lines in order to achieve the same goal. 

    Wildwood MX, Picture by Bobby Bammann My approach is this… be as prepared as possible and do not rush the processes that take time. It wouldn’t be very wise to rush into the first regional event with semi-adequate preparation, not only in the sense of myself, but also my bike. Instead, I am giving myself plenty of time to continue riding, becoming faster on the bike and becoming stronger physically and mentally through gate drops and training with great people who know the process and know what it takes to reach where I want to go. Every time I am on the bike, I strive to learn something new about myself, the bike, push myself to try new things, and if I am unsure about something, be open to the advice given. With that being said, big thanks to those in my company that are making my journey to make myself great more possible than ever; Ricky Renner, RJ Hampshire, and DJ MacFarlane. I personally believe that the best form of training is to race. If you fall in a moto during training, you can rush to get up and get back going again to simulate a race. However, the environment of actually being in a race where everything you do has a real consequence can create a very different mindset. Gate drops are key in order to have your important race days on lock *insert key-and-lock emoji here*. Obviously, having A class payback is always a nice incentive to go racing… getting some gate drops in and make a couple bucks in the process. On the other hand, experience, and of course fun, is what it’s all about. If you can’t keep it fun, then it’s not worth pursuing. Dade City MX, Picture by Erwin Ziegler I’ve never lived at a training facility, so my efforts have required a different level of mental toughness where no one is forcing my hand at being “mentally tough”. My efforts are self-imposed and they require the want and drive in myself to achieve success. Most of my competitors at the top level of amateur racing have spent months and years at training facilities with the constant intensity of daily and hourly practice and training sessions, being pushed beyond what I have ever experienced, other than my few weeks here-and-there training with professionals. After a year off, my hunger and desire to get back and surpass my previous standing in the racing community pushes me to aggressively attack my riding and training time with a new level of determination and maturity to quickly reconcile mistakes, figure out why I goofed it, make necessary adjustments, and find the best course of action for me to be the best I can be. Lazy River MX Loretta Lynn's Area Qualifier, still shot from a video taken by Ricky Renner By this time next month, regionals will be finishing up and it’ll be time to prepare for the big show. Check in for content along the way and come along for the ride, tap/click the "Follow" button! I’ll see you at the races.  Scott Meshey #141
    • 1 comment
    • 768 views
  • Coach Robb

    MotoE - Fueling for Performance Bundle Now Available!

    By Coach Robb

    Frustrated with trying to figure out what or when to eat and drink during your athletic training and racing? Cramping? Bonking? Feeling tired all the time? Whether you’re a national champion or weekend warrior, this workshop is designed for every type of racer. MotoE founder, Coach Robb applies his 34 years of experience as a nutrition and performance coach to provide proven solutions to the most common nutrition and hydration frustrations. You will walk away with: ▶ Customized nutritional & hydration strategy for improved strength to weight ratios, speed & endurance ▶ Proven process for determining what you need to eat & drink (and how often) during training and racing ▶ Clear understanding of what foods aid in muscle recovery and support your adrenal and immune systems Order Here - CLICK HERE Get a sneak peek of the presentation here:      
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    • 482 views
 

The Passion of Nachos

My Backyard-an official tour video of MotoMission Peru   I remember when I first became hooked on dirt bikes. It was during a ride with Barry, one of my growin' up buddies. I rode his brothers Honda XR80 as I did my best to keep up. I recall being so far out of my comfort zone and the blood rushing thrill of that first ride. It didn't take long for the moto fire to start burning. In fact, I bought that bike. I paid $100 of which most was lunch money that I had saved by fasting. Ahhh, that feeling of a new passion...  
 

Nacho feeling his inner peace...   And so it was with Nacho, my new moto pal. Just six months ago, he took his first lesson. He told himself that he needed to give dirt bikes a try for five lessons. If he liked it after that, he would give himself permission to buy a new bike.   Nacho bought his bike and the adventure continued. He lives in Lima, the capital of Peru. They have some great riding there, but it does not compare to the majestic routes through the back country of the Andes. Lima is on the coast. They have amazing dunes and coastal mountains, but it ain't no Cusco! There is a big dirt bike community there. Due to a couple of mutual friends, Nacho found out about MotoMission and decided that he wanted to see some of his country that most from Lima never get a chance to see...The Andes in the Cusco region.  
It's always exciting to head out on another adventure   We coordinated the dates and the rest of the details. Nacho wanted something fun, but not super extreme. I had just the idea...The Golf Course is what I call it. It's a landscape like dunes, but if you can imagine that the dunes were made of short and smooth grass. Ups and downs, some steep some not. Total freedom to ride without a trail and an area so big you don't do the same line twice. It's a paradise for any dirt bike lover, even the new ones like Nacho.   We rode till our arms were ready to fall off. A million smiles and pictures. Nacho was exposed to another world. His passion reached a whole new realm.
I find it a privilege to douse the moto passion flame of another with a bucket of 98 octane fuel. It thrills me to no end. Every time I go out on a tour, one of my goals is to make sure that each client loves dirt bikes more after being out with MotoMission. It's one of the ways I measure success.  
The views never stop   As you all head out on your next ride, I would like to challenge you to make it a point to build up the passions of others. Share some knowledge with a young rider. Stop and help another rider on the trail. Take out different riders with you to your favorite riding spot. Bring new people into the sport. Make it enjoyable for them and you might find another riding buddy in the near future. I can't wait to see where Nacho's passion takes him in the next year!  
A happy camper!   If you are interested in taking your passion for adventure to a new level, consider joining me for a mind bending enduro tour through the Andes of Peru. Space is limited, but there are many dates available in the coming months. Message me through Thumpertalk or email me at Scott@motomissionperu.com. I am always looking for another riding partner.
Until next time, stay on the gas!   Scottiedawg

scottiedawg

scottiedawg

 

How Much Damage Can An Improperly Cared For Air Filter Cause?

I thought this week it would be a good idea to share with you an example of what can happen when dirt gets passed an engine's air filter. This will be a short post, but a picture is worth a thousand words. In my next post I’ll go into detail on how to properly care for your air filter to help ensure that this never happens to you.   The series of photos below shows a sad case where dirt has found its way into the engine and wreaked havoc. The photos are all from the KX250F I bought on the cheap with the sole intention of rebuilding the engine and documenting the process for my book, The Four Stroke Dirt Bike Engine Building Handbook. Honestly, I couldn’t have bought a better bike for the project, nearly everything on the bike was worn out or screwed up from the previous owner.   Here is how the air filter and airbox looked prior to disassembly.
  Here is the back side of the air filter. The filter was completely dry. There was no grease on the sealing face of the filter or the airbox flange. In this particular case, dirt could have got into the engine through the filter or between the filter and sealing flange. The amount of dried mud in the airbox and on the bike also makes me suspicious that muddy water got into the engine instead of just dirt. I honestly can’t say for certain.     The airbox itself was also extremely dirty.     Once the engine was disassembled I carefully examined the piston assembly and cylinder bore. At first, I could not get any of the rings to move freely. Only after I had pounded a pick between the ring ends of the compression ring was I able to get the compression ring off. As I removed the compression ring, a load of sand came with it.   This photo of the compression ring doesn’t do the situation justice. Some of the dirt was actually removed from the ring as I handled it.
  Here is a close up of the compression ring. Note all the grit!  
  The oil rings didn’t fair any better, were just as stuck, and had a lot of dirt on them.  
  Here you can see dirt inside the ring grooves and at the edges.  
  Here is dirt I rubbed off the oil rings.     Miraculously (and fortunately for me) whether the engine sucked in dirty air or water, it happened quickly and stuck the rings to the piston so they could no longer seal correctly, and the engine subsequently lost compression and power in a hurry. This speculation is based on the fact that the cylinder bore showed no signs of excessive wear or damage and it measured well within the service limits. This is an outcome I never though possible and is hard to believe.   I hope you enjoyed this brief write up on the damage that can result from ingesting dirt, whether from abnormal circumstances such as dropping a running engine into a mud hole or simply neglecting to take care of the air filter when running the engine in dusty conditions. In my next post I’ll show you how to care for and install your filters so these problems don’t happen to you! Questions or comments are always welcome and I enjoy hearing from you all!   -Paul
https://www.diymotofix.com/   If you like my blog, click the "Follow this blog" button in the upper right. You must be registered to do this.

Paul Olesen

Paul Olesen

 

How to be Grateful for Your Next Flat Tire

I am spoiled! There is no other way to explain it. A few weeks ago, I took out a young fella on a dirtbike adventure through the Andes of Peru; Four days of enduro bliss. We took a million pictures, played around with different video angles, and rode our butts off. Did I mention it was a legendary ride? I consider it a privilege to take out clients on tours. I "get" to come along. Of course, I am the guide and have some responsibilities, but really, it's just a
couple of buddies going on a ride.  
Ready for four days of enduro bliss  

Here is the official tour video of our four day enduro adventure  
Daniel and I connected right away. He 's a super cool dude that loves dirtbikes. Nothing else needs to be in common to enjoy the heck out of each other. I had a four day schedule loosely lined up. At least the end points for each day.  
I never know how people are going to respond to the altitude. I also never know the level of each rider. I have had the whole spectrum of riders. Some claim their professional status and ride like they have had a couple of months under their belts. I have also had the bashful ones that timidly tell me that they are "an OK rider" and then rip out of sight as I mess my pants trying to catch up. I have a test hill just behind my house that connects to thousands of miles of trails. I use it as a filter. Those that make it up without any problems have an open slate as to what trails we can ride. Daniel made it up without any trouble. Sweet. No limits!  
So many photo ops!   Our first day was mostly a ridgeline above the city of Cusco. It's hard to imagine a ridge that goes for so long and with such a fun single track running along the crest, but this is one of my favorite trails. This trail alone is sufficient for a day's ride. It's challenging, the views are ridiculous, and it's as fun as riding dirtbikes can be. We finished the day, smoked tired, in a little town called Ollantaytambo.  
Epic Trails for Days!   Day two took us through an incredible couple of valleys. One going up to the pass, the other from the pass to our destination. The route was filled with rhythmic windy single track, mud bogs, rock gardens, and views forever. We also met up with a local family and hung out for a bit. The first part of the day was perfect. One cannot enjoy dirtbikes much more than we did.   We arrived at our destination in the afternoon. We grabbed a bite to eat, rested a bit, then went out to explore a new trail. When I say a new trail, it needs to be understood that it has never had a motorcycle on it before. That is part of the thrill of riding here in Peru. There are hundreds of trails that have never been crossed by a motorcycle.   Daniel and I found another honey hole. This trail took us deep into a picturesque valley. We ended up near a small group of homes with a number of curious kids to help guide us through the maze of rock fences and farms. These kids were so fun. Their faces showed their excitement to have a couple of crazy Gringos doing trials over any obstacle they suggested we try to conquer. They ran alongside at breakneck speed trying to help us at the next turn in the trail. Daniel and I had a blast with these kids. Daniel brought along a handful of pens to give out. They certainly enjoyed the pens, but also enjoyed the moto show as we traped up the gnarly goat trails behind their houses. It was fun for all!  
A happy fella and a great place to take a break   We returned back to the Lares Hot Springs for dinner and a good couple of hours of soaking our tired bodies before calling it a night. We had so much fun exploring the new trail with the kids, that we decided that we would go back the next day.   Day three was something out of a dirtbike fantasy movie. We headed back up the valley, found the main route that continued to the Sacred Valley of the Incas, and began our way up toward the top edge of the valley. The route was a mule trail. Supplies are packed in via mules to provide the necessary items for the families that live along the way. This takes the definition of rural to a new level.   The trail was a challenging mix of single track anywhere from 10-20 inches wide. The ledges one either side went from a gradual slope to a sheer cliff. The obstacles that lay in the middle of the trail were a combination of steep climbs, VW sized boulders, gardens of granite, creeks, mud, and sometimes all of these obstacles were fused together in the same location to create an almost impossible crossing. It was so good. We gladly suffered. The views were worth every bit of soreness we would feel for the week following.   We reached our limit. Our energy tanks were empty, and we headed back to the hot springs for dinner and a soaking. Day three was epic!
We headed out in the morning on the fourth day towards the town of Yanahuara in the Sacred Valley of the Incas. The length of the ride was not too long, but that does not mean it wasn't a long ride. To reach the pass, we found ourselves lifting up fallen bikes, picking gravel out of our gear from the numerous get-offs, and upon reaching the highest point in the day, found ourselves getting pelted by large hailstones finding any bare skin we might have had showing. The views were incredible up to the point where we entered the clouds. We spent only a brief moment on top of the pass, then headed down to warmer and dryer ground. From the pass at 15000 feet and some change, we headed down to the valley at about 8000 feet with no uphill. With our triceps burning and grinning from ear to ear, we reached the valley, ate a hearty lunch, then geared up for the final part of the route that would take us back to Cusco.   From Yanahuara, we climbed up a technical downhill mountain bike path. That brought us to the town of Maras, where we crossed over some beautiful farmland near Chinchero and then onto the last section before dropping into the Cusco valley. We made it almost all the way back before either of us had a notable get off. Daniel looped out on a steep climb and tested out the strength of his helmet. He was fine, just a little shaken up. We arrived back in Cusco just before dark, thrilled to have finished the route.  
Life Lesson-Be grateful for your next flat tire...   There were a ton of details that I left out. There is no way to describe the thrill of ripping up a virgin trail in the Andes of South America. There is no way to explain the vividness of the colors as we gazed across the valley. There is no way to share the feelings that we experienced as we stretched our moto limits on the edge of the canyon. I can just say that doing it is the best option. Daniel joined the club of the few that will ever have the opportunity to ride hard enduro here in the Cusco region of Peru.
We managed to take a ton of video and pictures while on our ride. The final video, called Pure Grin is complete and will give you a good idea of what it's like to ride in Peru. Please feel free to watch and share with your buddies. If you want to join the club with Daniel and I and the few others that have experienced MotoMission Peru, just me a message. I would love to put together a life altering moto adventure for you and your buddies. You can message me through Thumpertalk or via Scott@motomissionperu.com. You can also visit the website at www.motomissionperu.com. There are also a bunch more MotoMission tour videos out on the YouTube channel at MotoMission Peru Dirtbike Adventures.  
Reaching the Pass is always a challenge, but always a thrill.   Feel free to follow along with Motomission by "Following" this blog. You will be notified when a new post comes out.   Until the next time, keep the wheels down!   Scottiedawg

scottiedawg

scottiedawg

 

RIDING BETTER STARTS AT THE GROCERY STORE?

10 SHOPPING RULES FOR OPTIMUM HEALTH & PERFORMANCE
Yes, believe it or not, there are some “rules” to follow EVERY time you go shopping, these will keep you from purchasing items that will keep you from making wise food choices and ultimately undermining you’re eating & drinking habits. Keep in mind that you eat for only one purpose: to fuel your life in the healthiest way possible. Following these rules will ensure that you have exactly what you need, how much you need and avoid having to throw anything away because it has spoiled (this will save you money too!).   Shopping Rule #1: DON’T SHOP ON AN EMPTY STOMACH
Literally eat a high protein & fat snack (protein & fat are the ONLY nutrients that satisfy hunger) prior to walking in (i.e. apple and cheese stick, banana and almond butter).   Shopping Rule #2: PREPARE A SHOPPING LIST & ONLY PURCHASE WHAT IS ON YOUR LIST
If you have to purchase something this isn’t on your list but a necessary ingredient to a recipe, meal or snack then add the item to your shopping list for future reference. The key is to create & maintain a consistent shopping list (you will notice that you eat 18-25 of the same items every week) to carry with you to your farmers market or grocery store every time you go shopping.
[NOTE: your energy levels & performance results will help you determine if you should keep an item on your weekly shopping list. If your energy is high & your performance results are good, you know your food items are working and vice versa.]   Shopping Rule #3: SHOP 2 TO 3 TIMES A WEEK
Shopping two to three times per week will ensure that you have ripe, high quality fruits, vegetables and lean sources of protein readily available. Ideally, set your personal schedule to permit you visiting the store on Wednesday, Friday and Sunday. Shopping on Sunday allows you the opportunity to go home and prep, pack and store your food items for Monday – Wednesday. Wednesday allows you to purchase, prep and store for Thursday and Friday. Friday provides you the opportunity to purchase, prep and store what you will need for an active Saturday and Sunday. As we will discuss later, it is the lack of availability that keeps individuals from eating properly verses the lack of desire. If it isn’t available, you are forced to lean on convenience and you find yourself eating out of a drive through window or out of a package.   Shopping Rule #4: SHOP SOLO
Shop solo – this will keep others from influencing your shopping efforts. This will eliminate the impulsive purchases and save you money.   Shopping Rule #5: SHOP THE PERIMETER OF THE STORE
Shopping the perimeter of your grocery store is where you will find fresh/raw food items. With the exception of small ingredients (salt, pepper, olive oil, etc.), there is nothing in the center of the store that you need to be eating. This is NOT to be confused regarding the dairy case – especially the organic items. Dairy items can be a good source of protein, calcium, etc. for those that are not lactose intolerant.   Shopping Rule #6: PURCHASE MORE THAN YOU NEED
Purchase one or two more items than what is on your shopping list – especially your fruits and vegetables. If you think you will consume 10 oranges, purchase 12. This will keep you from running out. If you find that every three days you have two to three items left, then cut back. But as a general rule of thumb, it is better to want it and not have it verses wanting it and not having it available. Running out should be avoided at all costs – your health is worth it.   Shopping Rule #7: USE A SHOPPING CART VERSES A BASKET
If the basket becomes full (or heavy) you will be tempted to cut back on the amount of real-raw food that you are purchasing – this undermines Rule #6. If you are purchasing fruits and vegetables in bulk, you will have numerous bags; putting them in a shopping cart will minimize the amount of damage to your items because you are not “stacking” them in your basket.   Shopping Rule #8: LABELS SHOULD ONLY CONTAIN 1 INGREDIENT
When you pick up an item, stop and read the ingredients listed on the label. If it has more than one ingredient, put the item back on the shelf. Remember, single ingredient packages represent an ingredient that will be used with your snack and meal preparations. If the item has more than one ingredient, read shopping rule #9.   Shopping Rule #9: EAT ONLY WHAT YOU CAN PRONOUNCE
If you can’t pronounce it, don’t purchase–much less eat it! This shopping rule is actually eliminated when you implement shopping rule #8; however, if you must purchase something that has more than one ingredient (we all have weak moments & time restraints) you should be able to pronounce each ingredient in the product (the Braap Bar is a perfect example of a convenient, real food snack bar). If you can’t pronounce the ingredient Trimethylxanthine, it is safe to assume that it isn’t good for you to consume!   Shopping Rule #10: UPDATE YOUR SHOPPING LIST
Before checking out, take a moment to review and update (with items you forgot to write down before you left for the store) your shopping list. This is also your last opportunity to verify that you have everything on your shopping list in your shopping cart. Not only will this eliminate you having to make another time consuming trip back to the store for one or two items, it will also eliminate the need to run through a drive through because you didn’t have the necessary elements to prep, prepare and pack your snacks and meals.   Until next time, Train Smart-Not Hard!
-Coach Robb

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

Why You May Not Be Building Enough New Muscle After Working Out.

Researchers in Canada found that individuals who worked out and then ate 6 ounces of cooked ground beef (2x the recommended amount of protein in a meal), maximized their muscle growth verses those who only consumed 2 to 4 ounces. Those who consumed 2-4 ounces may not have consumed enough protein to preserve lean muscle (much less grow new muscle).

To enhance the growth of new muscle, lift weights and consume high quality protein. Having a hard time getting enough protein in on a daily basis, consume a 10 ounce smoothie with my Protein Fuel. It is plant based protein source that is easily digestible and has a powerful amino acid profile to build new muscle.

Please let me know if you have any questions about protein intake or need anything clarified!

-Coach Robb


Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

How Do You Keep Track of Where Bolts Go During a Rebuild?

Alright guys, this week I just want to share a short and simple tip with you on how to stay more organized during an engine build.   When it comes to major engine maintenance or repairs, usually the engine covers have to come off or the crankcases must be split. The covers and cases are almost always retained using different length bolts. The repercussions of installing the bolts in the wrong order upon reassembly can be very damaging. This is especially true if you install a bolt that is too short for its location and only a couple of threads engage, ultimately stripping the threads when you tighten the bolt.   So what’s an easy way to keep track of cover or case bolts that are arranged in a pattern of different lengths?   My favorite way to organize these bolts is to take a thin piece of cardboard (think cereal box thickness) and then slit the approximate bolt pattern into the cardboard so that the bolts cannot get mixed up. A picture is worth a thousand words so check out the one below. You need not be an artist to apply this tip, simply slit the pattern, add a couple reference points and you’re done!     Do you have any organizational tips you’d like to share? Leave a comment below because I'd love to hear about them!   If you are looking for more helpful tips and engine building info, feel free to check out my book, The Four Stroke Dirt Bike Engine Building Handbook. You’ll find 301 pages filled with crucial and down-to-earth four-stroke engine building knowledge. You've got one more week left to use the offer code tt2016 and receive 15% off your order!   Paul

Paul Olesen

Paul Olesen

 

Ain't no stinkin' rules!

I have an upcoming tour in a few days; A guy from southern California coming down for a 4 day hard enduro excursion. This guy sounds like a really good rider. I can feel them out with any number of questions and bike talk. I am not sure what he said that gave me the impression, but I feel pretty confident that he will be able to ride anything I put under his knobbies.   Here is a little promo vid to show you what its like to ride here!
 
Riding in the back country of Peru affords many a view!   For me, there is also another element. I need to love what I do. I need to be able to enjoy each customer I take into the back country. I need to have excitement in my riding as well. Having an adventurous client is like riding on a new tire; gripping!   I have the route already planned out. Well, sort of. It consists of starting and ending points. However, the options to reach those places are numerous. In fact, there are hundreds of trails that I have not explored. This guy told me that he is down with trying out some new things. He just wants a crazy enduro adventure. The word FREEDOM comes to mind.

Exploring leads you to places like this!   This guy wants to explore. I get so giddy when I have the opportunity to check out new trails. Normally it entails me packing up my gear and heading out alone. There aren't many other riders around or they only have a few hours each week where they can ride. SO, when a customer is willing to explore, I take full advantage. It never disappoints!   Some of you may live in areas where a lot of trail restrictions and government regulations limit your riding options. I have lived that life. However, here in Peru, there ain't no stinkin' rules! Riding here is full of freedom. First of all, there is no dirtbike traffic. I have yet to run across another dirtbiker on the trail. We don't have designated areas to ride. We have a few places where riding is not recommended(by me), but the majority of the landscape is open. Of course we have to respect Mama Nature and not tear up her yard, but it is free to roam. 300 miles in any direction and I can find a perfect mix of any type of riding imaginable. The freedom of dunes, single track mountain riding, gnarly ridges on top of everything, woods, golf course like moto playgrounds , challenging water obstacles, and rock gardens all with a billion views that you might find on the Discovery Channel; that's my backyard.   Needless to say, I am quite excited to go out on my next excursion. Four days of enduro bliss. The freedom of riding with only two people, the thrill of trying out new trails, the exhilaration of coming over the ridge to find a view that begs one to reach for a camera. That's where I will be next week.

First ever dirt bike tracks on this one!   I will give you a ride report on the next blog post. Stay tuned to see how it goes.
Keep the rubber side down!   Scottiedawg   By the way, if anyone out there in TT land is interested in riding in Peru, give me a ring or send me a message. Motomission Peru is operating as a social enterprise hard enduro tour operation. All the profits go to support the Altivas Canas Children's project on the outskirts of Cusco. When you ride with us, it supports the kids. Round up your buddy's and come down for an adventure!

scottiedawg

scottiedawg

 

Reduce Your Body Fat to Improve your Speed & Endurance (Part 1)

It isn’t a secret that there is an optimum strength to weight ratio when it comes to going fast on a motorcycle; however, getting to your ideal weight (percentage of lean muscle & body fat) where you have both strength & endurance is the key to your success. Most riders & racers, when they attempt to lose body fat, end up tearing down muscle for energy which results in a lighter number on the scale, but a significant reduction in overall body strength, along with reduced levels of speed & endurance on the bike.   In my opinion, when it comes to losing body fat long term, you must first stabilize your blood sugar levels and satisfy your appetite. There are only two things that satisfy appetite: fat and protein. Protein plays a significant role with building new muscle and supporting your immune system. Fat plays a major role in vitamin & mineral regulation, protection of internal organs, etc.   Below is a Clean Eating Challenge that I believe is a great tool to implement every three months throughout the year. This Clean Eating Challenge is designed to help stabilize your blood sugar levels with real food & determine your sensitivities associated with carbohydrates (a medical symptom referred to as carbohydrate intolerant-CI).   Coach Robb’s Clean Eating Challenge
CI is a common problem in many populations and the diseases associated with this condition are reaching epidemic proportions. This challenge, created by Dr. Maffetone, helps you identify if you experience common symptoms of CI including: sleepiness after meals, intestinal bloating, increased body fat, fatigue and others. Here is an outline of the various stages associated with CI:   Early stages of CI include elusive problems associated with blood-sugar handling, such as fatigue, intestinal bloating and loss of concentration.   Middle stages include a more serious conditions including hypertension, elevations of LDL, lowering of HDL, elevated triglycerides, excess body fat and often obesity.   Long term CI manifests itself as various diseases, including diabetes, cancer and heart disease.   Final stages include a condition referred to as Metabolic Syndrome. This stage is includes disorders such as: hyperinsulinemia, Type 2 Diabetes, Hypertension, Obesity, Polycystic ovary, Stroke, Breast Cancer, Coronary Heart Disease, High Blood Cholesterol and Triglycerides.   Please note, CI is an individual one, affecting different people in different ways. The key to avoiding disease is to be aware of CI in its earliest stage and to make the appropriate diet and lifestyle changes. The following are some common complaints that occur immediately after eating a meal or for others remain a constant symptom or feeling.   STEP ONE
Prior to beginning this challenge, evaluate if you experience any of the following (check the box if applicable so that you can reference if the symptom(s) still persist after completing the two week Clean Eating Challenge):   Physical Fatigue: Overall feeling of fatigue; morning through lunch or even all day.   Mental Fatigue: Inability to concentrate; loss of creativity, poor memory, poor grades, various forms of “learning disabilities”. This is more pronounced immediately after a meal or if a meal is delayed or missed.   Blood Sugar Handling Issues:
Fluctuations in blood sugar are normal during the day, but are amplified if meals are not eaten on a regular schedule.
Feeling jittery, agitated and/or moody (symptoms that immediately subside once food is consumed).
Craving for simple sugars, chocolate or caffeine; bouts of dizziness.   Intestinal Bloating:
Suffer from excessive gas; antacids or other remedies are not successful in dealing with the gas levels.
Gas tends to be worse later in the day and into the night.  
Sleepiness:
Feel sleepy immediately after meals containing carbohydrates, particularly a pasta meal or a meal that contains
bread, potatoes or dessert.   Increased fat storages & weight:
For most individuals, too much weight is too much fat. In males, abdominal fat is more evident and in females it is
more prominent in the upper body, upper thighs and in the face.   Increased triglycerides:
High triglycerides are not only found in overweight individuals. Individuals with high triglycerides are the direct result
of carbohydrates from the diet being converted by insulin into fat.   High Blood Pressure:
Most individuals dealing with hypertension produce too much insulin and as a result are carbohydrate intolerant. For
some, sodium sensitivity is common and eating too much sodium causes water retention along with elevated blood
pressure.   Depression:
Because carbohydrate adversely affect the levels of neurotransmitters made in the brain, feelings of depression
and/or sleepiness can result. Sugar has been promoted as if it is a stimulate, but in actuality, has the opposite effect.   Addiction:
Individuals who are addicted to alcohol, caffeine, cigarettes or other drugs often have many of the above mentioned
symptoms.   STEP TWO
Send me your email and I will send you a copy of my MotoE Body Measurement Spreadsheet. When you receive the file, double click on the attachment and print. You will want to capture these numbers prior to completing the Clean Eating Challenge. to watch a video on how to correctly capture your body measurements for accuracy.   STEP THREE
Purge (throw away – don’t give it to anyone, they don’t need it either!) your cabinets and refrigerator of the following:
- Breads, rolls, pasta, pancakes, cereal, muffins, chips, crackers and rice cakes
- Sweets and products that contain sugar such as ketchup, honey, etc. (read the labels to ensure there is no sugar)
- Fruit juice
- Processed meats that contain sugar
- Fat Free, Skim & 2% Milk, half and half
- Fat Free or Low Fat Yogurt & Ice Cream
- Energy Bars and Energy Drinks that contain fructose
- All soda, including diet
- Alcohol, except dry wines   STEP FOUR
Time to go shopping to stock up with what you will need to get this challenge under way!   Few considerations:
Note: don’t consume anything on this list without prior approval from your doctor-NO EXCEPTIONS!
- Plan ahead so that you are never without sufficient food
- Avoid becoming hungry – unlimited amounts of food are available to you, eat every 2 hours
- Don’t focus on the volume of food you are consuming – just eat
- Take the time to chew your food completely – this will aid in the digestion and absorption of your food
- Consume enough vegetables (at least 6 servings per day) to maintain fiber intake (and avoid constipation)
- Drink cold filtered water at a rate of .5 ounces per pound of body weight
For Example: 150 pounds x .5 ounces = 75 ounces per day   Food you can eat in unlimited amounts:
- Smoothies made with real fruits and vegetables
- Steamed or raw vegetables (avoid white potatoes and corn) – organic ideally
- Fresh fruit - organic ideally
- Nuts and seeds – organic and free of any oils and salt
- Almond butter – organic ideally
- Extra virgin olive oil
- Balsamic Vinegar
- Whole fat mayonnaise
- Whole eggs
- Non American yellow cheese – look for hard cheeses like Swiss, Provolone, etc.
- Meats (beef, turkey, chicken, lamb, etc.) – free range and sugar free (read the label here!)
- Fresh Fish (cold water Atlantic) – salmon, sardines, albacore white tuna (nothing out of a can)
- Fresh Shellfish
- Tofu
- Mustard (as long as there isn’t any sugar added)   Helpful Suggestions:
Eggs
- Omelets: any combination of vegetables, meats and cheeses
- Scrambled with guacamole, sour cream and salsa
- Scrambled with a scoop of ricotta or cottage cheese and tomato sauce
- Boiled or poached with spinach or asparagus   Salads
- Chef-leaf lettuce, meats, cheese, eggs
- Spinach-with bacon & eggs
- Caesar-romaine lettuce, eggs & parmesan cheese
- Any salad with chicken, tuna, shrimp or other meat and/or cheese   Salad Dressings
- Extra-virgin olive oil & vinegar with sea salt and spices
- Creamy-heavy cream, mayonnaise, garlic and spices   Fish and Meats
- Pot roast cooked with onions, carrots and celery
- Roasted chicken
- Chili made with fresh meat, and a variety of vegetables such as diced onions, celery, peppers, zucchini, tomatoes and spices
- Steak and eggs
- Fish (not fried) with any variety of steamed vegetables
- Tuna melt on a bed of broccoli or asparagus   Snacks
- Celery stuffed with nut butter or cream cheese
- Guacamole with vegetable sticks for dipping
- Hard boiled eggs   Supplementation
Whey Protein
Fish Oil
Branched Chain Amino Acids   STEP FOUR
Time to eat and train! As mentioned above, eat every two hours (even if you are not hungry). During the next two weeks, keep all of your workouts aerobic, which means eliminating any and all weight lifting (it is anaerobic by nature) and any strenuous workouts (above Heart Rate Zone #2).   What to expect during the first week: If you have been eating lots of sweets or other carbohydrates, you may experience cravings for sugar for the first few days. You may experience a headache associated with withdraws – strive to use & to relax the muscles in the neck and upper shoulders. You may find yourself falling off of the program, not because you intend to, but rather due to the realization that processed foods are everywhere. If you eat something that is not “approved” you need to start over and this is ok!
  STEP FIVE
Stay consistent with both your food and aerobic training. Maintain a food intake log along with a detailed training log, specifically mental clarity, energy levels, average and max heart rate with each workout.   Over the next two weeks you will capture a better snap shot of your eating and how it reflects on your health, wellness & performance. Please feel free to email me if you have any questions or need anything clarified.
-Coach Robb   Coach Robb has been working with riders and racers since 1987 and is the founder of the Complete Racing Solutions Performance System, the Mental Blueprint of Success, the MotoE Amateur Development Program, the MotoE Educational Series and Nutritionally Green Supplements based out of Orlando Florida.   CompleteRacingSolutions.com is a premium resource center for motocross, supercross and GNCC riders of all abilities and ages. Visit CompleteRacingSolutions.com & subscribe to his bi-monthly newsletter that outlines the training solutions used by Factory KTM/Red Bull’s Ryan Dungey, multi-time Loretta Lynn’s & Mini O Champion’s Jordan Bailey (Factory Monster Energy/Kawasaki), Factory Kawasaki/Pro-Circuit’s Adam Cianciarulo and Loretta Lynn’s Champion, Gracie VanHorn, GNCC bike racers Charlie Mullins and Chris Bach, and GNCC Quad racer Roman Brown along with thousands of riders all around the world.   Instructional videos with Coach Robb can be found on the Coach Robb’s Youtube Channel addressing rider’s questions about speed, endurance, strength, nutrition, biomechanics, stretching, and soft tissue maintenance. Please visit CompleteRacingSolutions.com to subscribe to his bi-newsletter and learn more about various resources for riders. You can follow him socially on Twitter: @MotoCoachRobb & Facebook: Coach Robb.   In addition to his own newsletters, Coach Robb is a regular contributor to various websites. Robb can also be heard on the monthly radio show DMXS answering listener’s questions about nutrition & fitness.

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

4 Easy Ways To Improve Your Speed, Strength and Endurance in 8 Weeks!

In attempt to make up for lost time associated with winter, athletes & riders have a tendency to get a little over zealous during early season workouts which frequently produces injuries, sickness and performance frustrations. Implementing these 4 components will maximize your speed, strength and endurance in 8 weeks or less!   Identify and Eliminate Your Weaknesses
“Race your strengths and eliminate your weaknesses” is the motto that I say to all of my clients because as humans, we spend the majority of our time doing things that we like & what we are good at. To make the greatest progress within your training program, you must identify what you are NOT good at and start there. Establish where you are physically lacking – muscular strength, endurance, lactate tolerance and don’t forget the non-sweating disciplines of flexibility, nutrition and realistic goal setting; begin where you are the weakest or have room for the most improvement (relevant to your personal goals). Early season/baseline testing will help pinpoint your weaknesses as well as capture your current maximum heart rate for that specific discipline (see below).   If you don’t know how to identify your physical weaknesses, please email me at Robb@CoachRobb.com and I will send you some protocols (specific to your goals) to help you identify your physical weaknesses. Please include your specific goals in your email to ensure that I send you relevant assessment protocols.   Avoid Training Yourself into Exhaustion
By not knowing how hard you are actually training (verses perceived exertion), athletes run the risk of injury & burnout. Actual intensity levels need to be monitored with a heart rate monitor to ensure that you are training within your aerobic zone for the majority (not all) of your early season efforts. Please note that you must establish your heart rate training zones for each discipline that you train. For example, if you utilize the Concept 2 rower as a cross training tool, you cannot use your heart rate zones from the bicycle – more muscles are engaged during rowing than cycling which results in a different max heart rate number and associated heart rate zones. Over my last 22 years of coaching, I have seen the use of generic formulas (for example, 220-age) have a margin of error as high as 30-50%. The assessment of your pre-season max heart rate can be captured with a simple pre-season max heart rate assessment.   If you would like some assistance determining your accurate heart rate zones, please email me at Robb@CoachRobb.com and I will send you a copy of my sport specific Max Heart Rate Assessment and Heart Rate Spreadsheet so you can create your personalized heart rate zones to maximize your training efforts. Please include all sports that you currently train and race (specifically race distances/durations) so that I can provide you accurate assessment protocols.   Improve Your Power and Endurance without Sweating
Chiropractic care, massage therapy, trigger point therapy and hydro-therapy are that should be a part of every athlete’s routine for one simple reason: tight muscles pull bones out of alignment; misaligned bones keep muscles tight. If you visit a massage therapist and the attachments of the muscles are out of line, it is the same as if you pulled the ends of a rubber band far apart, no matter how much you rub the center, the band is still tight. You have to get the attachments of the muscles to the correct position before you will get the tension out of the muscle. The reverse is true as well. If you get an adjustment and the muscles are tight, the muscles will simply pull the bones back out of alignment. Lining up the spine and removing tension within the muscles will result in better strength and improved endurance.   Trigger points are the “knots” that you feel within the muscle tissue. These knots need to be removed before they become a chronic pain site along with the source of a muscle tear. Just like a piece of rope, a knot becomes the weakest point of the muscle tissue and needs to be addressed on a daily basis. Please implement these trigger point therapy exercises daily to improve your range of motion within a muscle.   Hydro therapy is the use of hot and cold to relax and facilitate recovery within a muscle tissue. Hot water will vasodilate (open up the blood vessels) and bring fresh blood flow to muscle tissue. Cold water will vaso-constrict (close up the blood vessels) and off set inflammation within the muscle tissue. By switching between hot water (ideally a Jacuzzi tub) and an ice bath (painful thought I realize!) you will reap big rewards when it comes to a faster recovery and improved muscle flexibility. Protocol suggestion: 10 minutes hot – 10 minutes cold – 10 minutes ambient air temperature while foam rolling.   Smart Eating Habits Produce Faster Speeds and Improve Endurance
Hands down, NOTHING will improve your speed and endurance faster than eating smart and staying hydrated!   What to eat, how much to eat and when to eat has become a big convoluted mess thanks to social media and the internet; however, it isn’t difficult at all. Simply shop the perimeter of the grocery store where you will find fresh fruits, vegetables and lean protein sources. Every two hours strive to eat one to two pieces of fruit and vegetables and 3-5 ounces of lean protein along with 10-16 ounces of cold water. That’s it – that simple!   The lean protein that you consume will repair any muscle tissue damage associated with training as well as improve your immune system. The fruits and vegetables will provide your body the necessary vitamins and minerals necessary to support your cardiovascular efforts, immune system as well as provide the catalysts necessary to produce energy.   If you would like to see how powerful eating is, please email me at Robb@CoachRobb.com and ask for my 2 Week Food Challenge. This challenge is designed to stabilize your bloods sugar levels and help you see how quickly the food you ingest influences your energy levels and performance (of all intensities and duration's).   Yours in sport and health,   -Coach Robb  

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

What Changes In Valve Shim Size Can Tell You About Your Engine

I hope you enjoyed my last post on ice tire studding! The season in my neck of the woods has been a bit short this year and I may be getting back to the dirt sooner rather than later. Nonetheless, Part II, which covers mounting ice tires is now up on my blog. You can view it here: Ice tire mounting.   In today's post I'm going to shift focus back to the engine and talk a little about valve technology. Valve technology and manufacturing techniques have changed substantially from the earlier days of engine development and I want to share with you some information about the current valve technology being implemented in your engines. I also want to discuss one way you can get a feel for how much life is left in your valves. Let’s get started.   The following excerpt is copied directly from my book, The Four Stroke Dirt Bike Engine Building Handbook. If you want to learn more helpful tips, which will bring your maintenance knowledge and engine building skills to the next level, I’d like to invite you to pick up a copy of my book by clicking here. Be sure to use the offer code tt2016 to get 15% off when ordering!   Alright, on to valves shim sizes.   The cylinder head assembly of most engines will wear out before it resorts to telling you it has had enough by catastrophically failing. Diagnosing these wear signs and knowing when it is time to replace components is the key to keeping the cylinder head assembly from failing. Due to the aggressive camshaft profiles, high compression ratios, and high RPMs required to make a lot of power, the valves and seats typically are the first parts to wear out within the cylinder head. Worn valves and seats will cause the engine to become difficult to start, have low compression, and have reduced power.     Modern valves found in dirt bike engines are made from either titanium or stainless steel alloys. Regardless of valve material, modern valve faces are either coated in a variety of anti-wear materials or hardened using various hardening processes. Common examples of trade names you might be familiar with include diamond like coatings (DLC) and black diamond coatings. These coatings are typically harder than the base material of the valve and help the valve resist wear, which occurs from ingesting dirty air and repeatedly contacting the valve seat. Coating and hardening processes are only present at the surface of the valve face. Depending on the type of valve and process used to harden it, the coating thickness can range from as little as 0.0001” (0.003mm) to around 0.003” (0.076mm). An easy way to visualize the thickness of the coating is to pluck a hair from your head and either measure it or feel it between your fingers. Most human hairs are around 0.002” (0.05mm) which should give you a good idea of how thick the coatings used on the valves are.   The important takeaway here is that if the coating is only a few thousandths of an inch thick, the valve can only be adjusted a few thousandths of an inch before it will have worn through the coating. Monitoring the starting valve shim size once the engine has been broken in (or new valves installed) and comparing that size to the shims required the next time the clearances are adjusted is a great way to assess valve health. Normally within the first 3-5 hours of breaking in a new engine the valve shim sizes may change slightly. This is due to the mating of the new valves to the seats and any valve seat creep which may occur. After this occurs and the valves have been shimmed to compensate, usually an adjustment up to around 0.004” (0.10mm) is all that can be done before a valve has worn through its hardened surface. Once this happens the valve face will wear much more quickly and start to wear out the seat as well. This will result in more frequent valve shim intervals and necessitate the need for having the valve seats cut. By paying attention to changes in shim sizes you will be able to approximate when the valves have worn through their hardened surfaces and must be replaced.   Thanks for reading and please leave questions or comments below. I enjoy hearing from you!   Remember you can get 300 pages worth of in-depth dirt bike engine information with The Four Stroke Dirt Bike Engine Building Handbook. Be sure to use discount code tt2016 at checkout to receive 15% off your order!   -Paul   DIYMotoFix.com

Paul Olesen

Paul Olesen

 

From Costa Rica to Peru...This guy loves dirtbikes!

His eyes came alive as he scooted over next to me to show me a video on his phone. The broken screen made it a bit hard to see, but as the video played, I realized the deep rooted passion that Gabriel has for motorcycles.   WATCH THE OFFICIAL TOUR VIDEO!!!

It was a short video of Gabriel straddling his KTM 2 stroke, his two year old boy in front with arms stretched out as far as they could go, gripping the throttle. With each twist of the grip, the motor wound up to a speaker blowing volume while the little guy grinned a face filled with joy. The video was certainly something you might see on a viral video thread. The little guys face was something to see. However, there was another element that made itself known to me.       Celebrating as we made it to the top...

The passion that Gabriel has for motorcycles is being passed on to his little boy. Gabriel continued to show me pics and other vids that had his little guy in every form of two wheeled bliss. From a strider bike in a skateboard park to the little tyke making moto sound effects as he worked with his dad in the shop, this little boy was all about motos.     One of the many photos...

Gabriel's eyes lit up as he talked about his little man. As I spent more time with this fellow, his passion for motos came right out into the clear. The reason his boy is so into bikes is because his father breathes it.   I received a Facebook message a few weeks back. It was a message from Gabriel. He had found our FB page and wanted to find out about the details of a hard enduro tour. He had already purchased his airfare. He came across one of those super good plane fares and decided to bring the family down to Peru for a vacation. While in Peru, he thought, he ought to ride dirtbikes. He was able to get away for a one day ride, although he would have done more if he could.   I worked through the details with him. He brought a bunch of his own gear. I outfitted him with the rest. We got an early start as he wanted to ride till he had no more in his tank(Energy, that is). Outfitted with four GoPros and enough batteries for a week, Camelbacks, and rain gear, we headed out from the house. I happen to have the Andes literally in my backyard. We rode from the house and out through some trails to get Gabriel used to the bike before we hit the gnarly fun stuff.
It didn't take long. This guy was comfortable on a bike. I am pretty sure that any bike would have been fine as long as it had two wheels and a motor that worked. In this case, we had a couple of Honda CRF 450x's.     A couple of happy riders

As I kept checking behind to see if Gabriel was there, he was often found right on my back wheel. I love it when I have a tour with a good rider. It makes for a thrilling day for me. It was just the two of us so we had nothing but flexibility. I have a plethora of trail options that would satisfy any rider. From super hard enduro, to rhythmic single track, to open grass mountain freeride, we hit it all.   Gabriel is from Costa Rica. He doesn't exactly live high up in the mountains. Riding in the Andes was a challenge, but he handled it quite well. We played around on the bikes until lunch was calling. We headed back down the mountain to a nice restaurant to fill our bellies with some fine Peruvian cuisine. There, we discussed the afternoon. He wanted to see more.   I have a "honey hole" of a trail that consists of a long ridge ride above the city of Cusco. On one side is the Cusco valley. On the other side, the Andes go down and up hundreds of time all the way to the Amazon Jungle. The views are breathtaking, but then again, that might be the altitude talking. Regardless, it is what enduro riders dream of. Gabriel was no exception. We took turns leading. That way I was able to get some great video shots in order to put together a cool ride movie for him to show his friends back in Costa Rica.   The day came to an end. We were both smoked tired, the sun was beginning to settle behind the mountains, and dinner was beckoning a call. The ride was over.     On the edge of the Sacred Valley of the Inkas

We made it back to the house, grinning from ear to ear. I took Gabriel back to his hotel, we copied each others photos and videos, and gave each other a big handshake and bro hug. It was a mutual feeling of satisfaction. He had just experienced an enduro ride of a lifetime. I wouldn't be surprised if Gabriel comes back with a couple of his buddies. For me, I get a special thrill firming up the moto passion of a fellow rider. I cannot wait till the next one!     Finishing off the day above the Cusco Valley...all smiles!

If you would like to follow the blog and receive up to the minute post about enduro riding in South America, just click on the follow button. Also, I welcome any feedback about the stories or about potential topics that I could cover. Thanks for taking the time...Scottiedawg

scottiedawg

scottiedawg

 

Somebody Help Me!

A few years back, I heard about a trail that went from an obscure little draw in the Sacred Valley of the Incas to a place called Lares. If you have ever been to either one of these places, you would know that the description is quite vague. That is how things work here in Peru. In fact, asking for directions is like using a wagging tail on an excited dog to determine your future.     This is a little taste of Cusco on a dirt bike!   My first attempt at this trail was solo. I am really the only guy around that is riding enduro. It may sound crazy to you, but to put it in perspective, let me give you an example. I live in a city with 600,000 people. There are about 50 to 60 that have dirtbikes, and most of those never leave the MX track. The motorcycle dealerships don't carry off-road bikes because there is no market. The Yamaha dealer once told me that it had been 12 years since they sold a YZ250. Basically, there is nobody riding or exploring the hundreds of trail options within minutes from my garage.
A typical Andean rock garden...Oh so fun!   Solo I was. Looking for the trail head to Lares. I was in an area where I thought the trail might begin. I asked the locals about the starting point. I received the common answers over and over. "Mas arriba" while they all pointed in different directions. One thing I have learned is to continue asking until you receive three of the same responses. Only then, do you have a fighting chance.
Glaciers start at about 19000ft(5790 meters)   There are two standard responses here in Peru when inquiring about places and/or directions. The first is always , "mas arriba" which translates to a little further up. It means that the person giving the directions has no clue about what you are asking. However, they always say it with such confidence, it is extremely hard to disregard the information.
This place is a smile factory   The second standard response begins when they look you over as you stand there in your riding gear next to your bike. To the locals, they see that as an 18 wheeler cargo carrying truck. They have no clue what a race ready 450 can do. In the typical Peruvian style finger swag that begins by pointing to the sky and finishes with a side to side waive of the pointer finger, they give you the words , "no hay paso." This translates to, "you ain't makin' it buddy!"
This is a common view...Only in the Andes!   Time and time again, I have experienced this situation. Now, when I get the finger wave and the "no hay paso," I get excited because that means there is a legendary trail in my future.
I finally rounded up enough intel to point me in the right direction. The best information came from a 9 year old boy who was pushing about 20 sheep up the road with a twig and his dog. He told me that the trail started at the end of the road. "Just keep going." He explained. He also told me that he lived in one of the communities up the trail.
Then, the finger wave came to light. After he told me where the trail was, he then proceeded to tell me that the route was not passable. I inquired about why he thought I couldn't make it. The boy pointed out that there were rocks, big climbs, river crossings, and lots of mud. Everything a dirtbiker dreams of, this boy was describing. I verified if it was prohibited to ride on the trail, my regulated American side, I guess. He didn't understand why I was asking as there is hardly anything prohibited in Peru when it comes to life in the mountains.
Riding up this valley is no walk in the park!   I asked for permission to ride the trail. Not sure why I thought the 9 year old was the authority, but I did it anyway. He smiled as if to tell me with his sarcastic grin that I didn't stand a chance. He's challenging me!
I began ripping up the trail. It was five out of five stars. Just like the kid said. Rocks, climbs, mud, water. But the views, he never mentioned. I was in a euphoria of motociclismo! Enduro could not get better than this.
I made it to the top of one of the many waterfalls   I continued for miles. I arrived at a small community of five or six houses where I was sure the little boy lived. There was a man working near the trail as I entered the area. I stopped and chatted with him. He was surprised to see a motorcycle. He told me that he had never seen a moto near his house. Most likely, I was the first. That is how things work in Peru. There is no dirtbike competition for the thousands of miles of trails. The man also confirmed that the trail would lead me to Lares.
After my short chat, I shook his hand and headed up the canyon ledge toward my destination. The trail was not easy. In fact, it was as much as I could handle. Riding solo is not a good idea. Without another rider to help through the rough spots, one is limited. I managed to work my way up past a couple of waterfalls, enormous rocky stair step sections, and through pristine valleys.
I reached the point where I was exhausted. I had a tiny bit of energy left, but only enough to get home. I came up to another grueling climb next to a waterfall. The traction looked good, but the switchbacks on the rock ledge were so tight I didn't want to risk it alone. I parked the bike and hiked to the top of the waterfall to take in the view of a lush high valley filled with grazing alpacas and glacier capped Andes.
Not today...I promised my wife I wouldn't take unnecessary risks when I am exploring alone. I will get it another day!
I made my way back down the trail to the Sacred Valley. I passed the little boy just below the community where he lived. I talked a bit and explained how far I went. He knew exactly where I turned back. He told me that the trail from the top of the waterfall to Lares is all flat or downhill. If I could make it to the top of the waterfall, I could make it to Lares.
I never get tired of the views...
I enjoyed every bit of the trail. Up and back...it was perfect. The views, the terrain, the single track were more than I expected. I failed to reach Lares, but I reached something. I left a little bit of meat on the bone, so to speak. I have to come back here to finish this route! Somebody come down here and join me. I have too many trails to explore!   For information about riding with Scott and MotoMission Peru, email to Scott@motomissionperu.com or message me through TT. Tours are private, high class, and extremely exotic. Contact MotoMission for your next international riding excursion. You won't be disappointed!

scottiedawg

scottiedawg

 

What happens to the brain when a concussion happens?

What happens to the brain when a concussion happens?
Inside your skull you have cerebrospinal fluid and of course your brain. A violent impact causes your brain to vibrate and sometimes even bump against the skull bone. If the force is too much, you end up with a concussion. Ironically, the trauma that occurs when the brain hits the skull, there is often no evidence of injury because the damage is on the inside, within the medical world it is known as the “Silent Injury” according to Dr. Lovell from the University of Pittsburgh’s medical center which researches concussions.   Once common mistake is assuming that because you didn’t get “knocked out”, then the hit to your head was minimal. In fact, if you experience vomiting, dilated pupils, loss of smell or taste you should visit with a neurologist immediately. Additional negative symptoms after a head impact are headaches, dizziness or memory loss lasting more than 5 day or delayed memory of easy questions (i.e. what did you eat for breakfast yesterday morning?).   4 Stages of a Concussion:
Impact to the head
The most common causes of concussions are falls, car accidents, impact sports and explosions. The trauma causes force to the head in two directions: linear (forwards and backwards) or rotational (side to side). These forces literally cause your brain to “slosh” within the cerebrospinal fluid and bump up against the skull.   Inflammation
Trauma to the brain can damage neurons, the cells that govern the flow of chemical messengers known as neurotransmitters. In the worst case scenario, those damaged neurons lose control of the neurotransmitters, allowing them to accelerate up to five (5x) their normal speed. The resulting chemical acceleration can cause memory loss, blurred vision, dizziness, headache and nausea.   Hibernation
Your brain’s cortex detects the neurotransmitter imbalance and tries to fix the neurons by calling for a surge of healing glucose. At the same time, calcium neurotransmitters start constricting the blood vessels, delaying glucose from reaching the neurons. Your brain function slows until blood flow returns to normal.   Recovery
Healing the neurons within your brain can take several weeks to within your brain. However, if you sustain another concussion during this period, you could suffer permanent damage and a lifetime of headaches and other adverse side effects.   Though it is hard for competitive athletes, but staying away from the potential of re-hitting your head, rest & proper nutrition will facilitate the recovery process.   Note: if you experience headaches after hitting your head, DO NOT consume aspirin or ibuprofen (this may increase your risk of brain bleeding); instead use acetaminophen.   Until next time, Train Smart-Not Hard!
-Coach Robb
http://www.completeracingsolutions.com

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

Motorcycle Ice Tire Studding - Part One

Happy belated New Year's! I hope the holidays were good to you and that you're looking forward to a new season of two wheeled excitement. I know I am and I'm excited to get back to work on this blog.   In today’s post I’m going to get into the details related to tire studding with the help of an industry expert. To help bring you the best information I can on studding ice tires, I’ve enlisted Jarrett King of Two Wheel Endeavors to help with this article. For those of you that don’t know, Two Wheel Endeavours is heavily involved in supporting Canadian ice racing efforts and offers studded tires, ice racing accessories, and custom ice solutions. Jarrett was involved in the development of the Mitas Ice King tires, knows his craft, and brings a lot of knowledge to the table.   Many people are under the impression that there isn’t much to studding a pair of tires, just screw some screws in and you’re done right? There is actually a hefty amount of skill involved with studding tires. These skills come down to knowledge of screw angle, head position, and screw length. Of course there are many parameters which all affect how well the tire will perform, but today we are going to talk mostly about studding. This attention to detail is a huge reason that guys who have perfected the art of tire studding can make a living at it. I’m not saying this to scare you off from trying to stud your own tires, just that if you’re going to go for it, it will take some practice and advice from an expert.   Now I’m going to turn it over to Jarrett who will go into detail on the aspects of tire studding.   Key Factors Affecting Tire Performance by Jarrett King   Tire Choice: Selecting the right tires to stud is critical in terms of traction and tire life. Lug height, tread pattern, carcass thickness, and rubber composition all have a huge influence on how well a tire will work. Unfortunately, there is not a lot of data supplied by tire manufacturers available to help guide a person in the right direction, but there is plenty of empirical data floating around among the ranks of ice riding enthusiasts. To help get you started I put together a list of the most common ice tire choices.   Front Tires
Mitas Ice King - (Top Left)
Bridgestone ED11 - (Bottom Right)   Rear Tires
Mitas Ice King - (Top Right)
Kenda K335 - (Bottom Left)
Motoz X-Circuit - (Not Shown)     Tire Liners: Depending on the tire chosen, a liner can be used that will provide protection for the tube and allows for the use of longer screws. The liner is usually a cut up street tire which fits inside the chosen tire.   Pattern: The pattern in which the screws are laid out on the tire has a huge influence on the traction and grip characteristics of the tire. Specific patterns may be tailored to provide more grip or slip depending on the rider and how the tire is used.       Consistency: Care must be taken to ensure the screw pattern is consistent from one lug to the next. Any deviation in screw location and angle can cause the tire to wander as it moves over the ice.     Rim Trueness: The trueness of the rim can have a big effect on how the tire performs. A wonky rim can cause inconsistency in screw alignment. This can lead to similar handling problems because the screw pattern is not aligned accurately.   Screw Type: AMA or Canadian style screws are the primary options for competitive ice racing. The two screw types are defined below:   AMA screws - 3/16” head height, sizes #8 or #10, and range in length from ⅜” to 1 ½”     Canadian screws - ¼” head height, size #12, and range in length from 1” to 1 ½”   Along with the screw requirements for the different racing classes, keep in mind purpose made ice screws go through a different hardening process than normal hardware store screws, allowing them to stay sharp longer. If you’re going to stud a pair of tires and want longevity, be sure to use a good quality screw such as those offered by Kold Kutter.   Screw Threads: Fine thread screws are preferred because they do less damage to the rubber during installation. They are also easier to set to the correct height when fine tuning the screws.   Screw Angle: The angle the screw is driven into the tire dictates how the screw contacts the ice. The screw angle can be broken down into two parts, the fore/aft angle, and the side angle. Sweep: Tire builders refer to the fore/aft angle of the screw as the sweep angle. Ideally only the leading edge of the screw should make contact with the ice. This can be achieved by angling the screw anywhere from 10 to 30 degrees upon installation.
Side Angle: Screws used to grip the ice when the bike is leaned over will be installed at an angle which complements the contour of the tire.

Head Alignment: The alignment of the slot in the screw head can be tuned to provide better grip in a given direction. For screws used for braking (front) and drive (rear) the screw slot is aligned perpendicular to the direction of travel. For cornering grip the slots of screws on the side of the tire are aligned parallel to the direction of travel.  
  Paul: Now that Jarrett has provided a great framework of what goes into studding a tire, we’re going to get into the specifics. It was mentioned previously that ice screws have three primary functions: braking, accelerating, and cornering. Next, we’ll get into the details of what makes each of these three types of screws functional for their specific purpose.   Braking Screws: Braking screws are at the rear of the lug on top, but when they are on the ground they are on the leading edge (biting edge) when under braking, thus the name “braking screw”. Sweep is used to prevent the screws from chattering on the ice under braking because of the fact that the crown would strike the ice at two points if installed flat. The magic sweep angle is the shallowest possible angle without the “rear” part of the screw crown biting in. With Canadian screws, this angle is much more straight up and down but still usually has 10 degrees or so. If you leaned them too far forward it will damage the knobs because the screw isn’t sunk into the liner enough, if you went straight in they will function but it makes the tire feel a bit strange under heavy braking.     Acceleration Screws: Again, there are differences between AMA and Canadian screws. The Canadian screws can go virtually straight in, AMAs need that biting edge so they don’t deflect or lose traction because of two different contact points. Picture a skate blade. The more sharp and precise the edge, the more ground pressure is focused on that area. Same with screw tips, if two parts of it hit the ice it will start to “float”. Optimal angle is shallowest possible (as close to straight up and down as possible) before the back edge of the screw starts touching the ice surface.
  Side Grip Screws: Cornering screws are typically run in at one angle, there is no sweep to them. Some builders have tried adding some sweep, however, never with too much angle. If you run an ice tire over a piece of cardboard under lean you will see that the top edge of the screw is contacting the ice at an angle that prevents the front tire from low-siding. In essence these screws do the exact reverse thing that the rear tire does under acceleration.     Paul: The last thing Jarrett is going to talk about is the screw pattern and some of the compromises that are made while studding.   Jarrett: When it comes to general screw pattern and arrangement, there are a couple things to consider. First, is that on the rear tire the inverse “V” pattern is there for a reason… what it does is each screw passes the load onto the next screw while under lean (picture them passing sandbags to each other). To prove this, reverse a V-pattern tire, it will be all kinds of squirrely under acceleration and then the rear will try to jump out from under the bike when you hit the brakes, it’s truly scary.   My second point, ideal screw pattern is a balance between a few different factors. Knob spacing, contact pressure and knob count/pattern. On a tire like a Kenda, so many screws are striking the ice at once that the tire is floating on the surface of the ice. Traction is being gained by getting the maximum number of screw heads to hit the ice at the same time. This is great until the moment that there is a hint of snow on the lake and the tire begins to act like a crazy carpet under the bike. It floats because it can’t maintain ground pressure.   The old Pirelli Lagunacross tire became amazing the moment that Marcel Fournier came out with the modern Canadian Ice screw. The knob pattern was ideal (V shaped paddle) for the application and the knob spacing was super wide, which meant great ground pressure on each screw. Unfortunately that also meant a much larger radial load on the screws and knobs which often lead to premature knob or screw failure. The Mitas Ice King does not generate the same ground pressure as the Pirelli because the knobs are quite a bit closer but the tire’s compound and knob pattern allow for a much better balance of ground pressure (traction) to durability ratio. Using AMA screws, a Mitas Ice King does not benefit from additional screw rows the way that a Kenda will because it will float much quicker, but without as many screws contacting the ice.   Ice tire building is a compromise. The perfect ice tire doesn’t exist in the same way that there is no perfect Intermediate MX tire… but there are some that are MUCH more effective than others.   My third and final point, ice tires have been built in north America since the early 30s. The angle of screws is something that has been tried in multiple arrangements hundreds of times over. For someone getting into the sport their enthusiasm may make them believe that changing things will create a magic setup, but the reality is that a true set of wheels (no dings dents, warps), with consistent screw angles and heights, proper air pressures, and properly balanced is the most effective way to kick ass out on the ice racing track. Oh and don’t forget to duct-tape that face (frostbite sucks!).   Paul: Whether you're new to the sport or have a few seasons under your belt I hope you found Jarrett’s info on ice tires beneficial . Check the DIY Moto Fix website for part two in a week and here again for part three. For those of you in warm states I encourage you to take a trip to a cold destination and give ice riding a try! Be sure to check out Two Wheel Endeavors if you're in need of tires or anything else ice racing related. If you have any comments or want to share some info please leave a comment below.   -Paul
DIYMotoFix.com

Paul Olesen

Paul Olesen

 

The Top 6 Characteristics You Need To Have To Rebuild An Engine

I hope you’re all having a good fall and are getting excited for the holidays. It snowed for the first time this year here in Wisconsin and I’m getting eager for the lakes to freeze over so I can get out and ride the ice. I need to set aside a good 7 hours to stud my tires and set up my bike before that can happen though!   Today I want to talk about six characteristics that are necessary to have when one sets out to build an engine. I’ve detailed how to tackle many different jobs, but honestly that is only half the battle. If you’re in a rush or lack the desire to understand the reasons behind what you’re doing, you will make mistakes and miss out on important things. Listed below are the traits that I believe can help you take your build to the next level.   1. Being Detail Oriented
What’s worse than getting started on a build only to realize you didn’t buy an important replacement part? Focussing on the details of a project can feel tedious at times but can pay off in the grand scheme of things. Before I get started on a project I spend a hefty amount of time researching what parts I’m going to replace and where the best prices are. Also, I will have a solid idea of the sequences I’ll use for disassembly and assembly. Another good habit for the detail oriented is to take notes throughout the build, which you can use at a later date should the need arise. When you have an appreciation for all the small details that go into a build, it will make for a much smoother project.   2. Having Patience
Have you ever been in a rush to do something and after you’re done you realize if you had spent just a bit more time the project could have turned out much better? I was this way with so many of the things I did when I was younger, but have learned to slow down and be patient as I work. Engines don’t go together instantaneously and being patient throughout the process, especially when things aren’t going as planned, is very important. There is nothing worse than making a huge mistake because you’re in a rush. Imagine finishing a build and realizing you left an important part on the table, depending on where the part came from, you just bought yourself another few hours of work. Trying to skimp on time more often than not costs you more time in the long run. Have patience and enjoy the process.   3. Being Observant
Just about every mechanical thing is gleaming with a story, and that story only reveals itself if you know what to look for. An engine is no different. From the parting lines on a component left by the casting tooling used to create it to wear patterns on a piston, there are hundreds of observations that can be made while working on an engine. As you work, keep an eye out for subtle anomalies that may tell you why something failed or broke. For example, things like snail tracks across a gasket, raised edges on gasket surfaces, or covers that don’t sit flat on a table - these are all good indicators of why a particular part was leaking.   4. Being Curious
Perhaps more appropriately titled, “a desire to understand mechanical workings”. It is incredible how much can be learned about the engine just by studying how specific parts interact within it. An engine is composed of many different subsystems and they must all work in order for the engine to function. By looking at the various interactions of the parts within an engine, the condition of the parts and reasons for any failures can be more easily understood. The next time you build an engine, challenge yourself to learn how all the different subsystems of the engine work. Once you learn this, diagnosing problems and identifying all the faulty parts becomes much easier.   5. Being Meticulous
The necessity to be thorough and meticulous throughout a build cannot be overstated. Whether it be taking extra steps to inspect components, measuring new parts, or taking extra time to ensure the condition of surrounding subsystems are okay, having meticulous tendencies can pay off. As an example, on more than one occasion I’ve purchased new parts that have been mispackaged or out of spec. Had I not made the choice to carefully measure the problematic new parts, I could have ended up with an engine that was destined to fail. While it may take more time to be meticulous throughout a build, there is a lot at stake, both in terms of time and money, making it all the more important to ensure everything is done correctly.   6. Having Ambition
Building an engine can be hard, things can go south unexpectedly, and projects can easily stall. Being ambitious and having a can-do attitude is important to ensure the engine doesn’t sit half torn apart in the garage never to be completed. Until you tear into the engine, you never know what you might find. I’ve disassembled engines many times in the past only to find I need to replace a lot more parts than I had planned (this seems to be my luck when I shop for bikes on Craigslist as of late). This can be a huge downer, but keeping the end goal of getting back out and riding in mind and having the desire to push through any and all obstacles is a must.   Do you have any engine building characteristics you want to share? Leave a comment below and tell everyone what you think it takes to build a great engine!   For those of you that believe you possess the characteristics of a good engine builder, be sure to check out my book, The Four Stroke Dirt Bike Engine Building Handbook, to learn more about the how and why behind engine building. Whether you want to be taught about the relationships between all the various parts within an engine, you are in need of pointers on picking the right performance parts, or you would like to see examples of wear patterns found on engine components, my book is here to guide and help you throughout your build.   With the holidays coming up, I want to extend a special four day offer to you for the handbook and all the other products at DIY Moto Fix. Between November 27th and November 30th if you purchase anything from DIY Moto Fix you will save 30% on your order. If you’ve got a significant other trying to do some holiday shopping for you, be sure to send the site their way before Monday the 30th  
Save 30% and check out the book and other products by clicking this link: DIY Moto Fix

Paul Olesen

Paul Olesen

 

Mangos at the Bottom

Tough ride, but the view was worth it
I try to explain the grandeur of the Andes in various forms of writing and I still feel inadequate to accurately describe what these mountains do to my mind. Prospective customers ask all sorts of questions. How will the altitude affect me? or what will the weather be like on the tour? It doesn't really work like that. Predicting the weather here is like taking as stab at who's going to win the Supercross series in 2027.  

 
This is Peru!
When one deals with altitudes like we have here in Peru, all bets are off. The weather system at the bottom of the mountain is one thing. The climate at the top is another. Two valleys over and the same altitude might produce even yet another microclimate. Cloud cover can bring bitter cold temperatures in an instant, while the sun shining on your helmet will nearly cook your skull. As the altitude plays tricks on your body, so does the weather and climate. Is it possibly for summer to be the cold months and winter to have the best weather? Yup! As we say here, "This is Peru!"  
 
The rock was this big!
Valleys of 8,000 feet rise up to 16,000. Growing mangos at the bottom and potatoes at the top. Well, maybe not at the top...nothing grows there! From jungle to treeline and beyond, the landscape of the Andes intrigues.
As for planning a hard enduro adventure in Peru, come prepared for everything under the sun. But then again, isn't that what the term enduro adventure is about? Tackling whatever comes your way and making sure you get to the end of the trail.  
 
Only 4600 meters(that's about 15,300ft)
On a recent tour with a couple of fellas from Europe, we enjoyed it all. Dry to wet, low to high, rocky to smooth, steep to flat. The Andes have it all within minutes. That's why I ride here. If I ever start taking this for granted, somebody punch me!  
 
Here is an idea of what its like to ride in the Andes
Check out some of these pics and videos from past rides. They will give you an idea what Peru is like.
Let us know when you are ready to ride the Andes, If you are interested in joining MotoMission on an enduro adventure in these incredible mountains, send us an email at scott@motomissionperu.com or message me through TT. Feel free to check out our YouTube Channel at MotoMission Peru Dirtbike Adventures and our website at www.motomissionperu.com.   Also, make sure to follow this blog if you want to receive the latest posts. Stay tuned for more and keep the wheels down!
Scott

scottiedawg

scottiedawg

 

How Does Octane Rating Affect Your Fuel?

Octane Ratings
In my last post I shared a tip I like to use when filling up fuel cans at the gas station. I also presented an example detailing how mixing two different fuels with different octane ratings affects the blended fuel's octane rating. Out of that post some comments were left regarding the necessity of running specific octane fuels. Today, I want to discuss the octane attribute of fuels in more detail.   What is the Octane Rating and How Is It Determined?
The octane rating associated with a fuel is a measurement of the fuel's resistance to detonation. To measure a fuel's octane rating it is either tested in accordance with test procedures established for the Motor Octane Number (MON) or the Research Octane Number (RON). In summary, a single cylinder engine with a variable compression ratio is used for testing. MON test procedures require the engine be run at 900RPM, inlet air temp be 38C, and ignition timing is set between 14 and 26 degrees BTDC (specific timing depending on the compression ratio). RON procedures are slightly less stringent with the engine operating at 600RPM, inlet temp between 20 and 52C (barometric pressure dependent), and the ignition timing fixed at 13 degrees BTDC.   The test fuel is run in the engine, the compression ratio is increased, and the point where the engine starts to detonate is observed. Once the test fuel has been run, its octane rating is determined by blending two base fuels together. Iso-octane with a RON of 100 and heptane with a RON of 0 are mixed together until the the engine detonates under the same conditions as the test fuel. By blending, the octane rating of the test fuel can be established. For example, if the blend of iso-octane and heptane resulted in a mixture of 13% heptane and 87% iso-octane then the test fuel would have an octane rating of 87.   What Rating System is Shown on Gas Pumps?
This depends where you live. In the United States the octane number on gas pumps is the average of the MON and RON numbers established for the fuel. In Europe the RON number is used. This is why if you ever go to a gas station in Europe it looks like they have higher grade octane fuels than we do in the U.S.   How Does the Octane Rating Affect Power?
The higher the octane rating of a fuel, the more resistance it has to detonation and pre-ignition. The more resistance a fuel has to detonation, the higher the engine's compression ratio can be set (within limits) or boost pressure if we're talking turbos.   When an engine is designed one of the driving parameters for development of the design is the type of fuel(s) that will be compatible with the engine. For example, if an engine is designed to work with fuels that have a minimum octane rating of 87, then the compression ratio of the engine must be limited to a value which ensures the engine never detonates when 87 octane fuel is used. For this example, say the compression ratio is 12:1. With a 12:1 compression ratio when fully optimized, the engine will produce a finite amount of power. Say 50hp.   Now take the same engine, raise the compression ratio to 13:1, and require a fuel with a 93 minimum octane rating be used in the engine. Due to the increase in compression ratio, the engine's power will increase. Perhaps to 52hp. This power increase is only possible by raising the compression ratio and increasing the octane rating (detonation resistance) of the fuel being used.   The takeaway here is that you will not see a power increase in an engine designed to run on 87 octane by putting in fuels with higher octane ratings without changing another parameter, such as the compression ratio. You would however increase the engine's detonation resistance by using a higher octane fuel. This may be beneficial if the engine is being operated under heavy loads or in harsh conditions where heat loads on the engine are abnormally high and the engine is more prone to detonation.   Wrap Up
I hope my brief explanation on octane ratings has shed some light on how they affect engine performance. As always, if you have questions or want to leave a comment please do so below. I enjoy hearing from you.   At this point, I want to thank everyone who has purchased a copy of my book. I appreciate the support and warm response to the release of the printed version. For those of you interested in the handbook please check it out by following this link: The 4t Handbook

Paul Olesen

Paul Olesen

 

Why you should stretch your legs if your back hurts!

The Frustrations of Tight Muscles   I want to encourage all of you (no matter how physically active you are) to get massage work completed at least once a month. If you are physically active, in addition to your monthly massage, you need to complete trigger point and single muscle stretches AFTER every workout.   My oldest son is struggling with back spasms because his quads (front of your thighs) are so tight. Think about this, your quads attach to the top of your pelvis. When your muscles are tight, they "pull" your pelvis forward which over stretches the muscles in your back and hips. So we are manually massaging his quads, foam rolling, trigger point, and stretching them 3x a day.   Since all of these muscles are intertwined together, they pull on one another. Your goal is to release any trigger points (think of these as "Knots" in your muscles) that will allow the muscles to be their normal length allowing for normal range of motion (without pain!).   Massage Therapist: find one that understands your activity level and your dedication to completing the maintenance work (hydrate, trigger point, etc.).   Trigger Point-Stretching: use the link below (tutorial videos) and implement AFTER exercising - when the muscle at it's warmest and receptive to trigger point and single muscle stretches.     Yours in sport and health,   -Coach Robb  

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

It's for the kids...Come ride the Andes of Peru!

People often ask me about what I do. I find myself explaining the process over and over again. To this point, telling the story hasn't gotten old or boring, it just energizes me and reaffirms my passions and focus. This truly is a motorcycle blog. My goal for this post is to share a business model that uses my favorite hobbie, dirtbikes, to make a difference in the life of a child. Bear with me as I give you the details. You can watch the video and get a full rundown if you are the type that wants the visual, but the business model will certainly inspire those that like that kind of thing.     A commercial about how we combine motos with a great social project   At about 1:30 each afternoon, a gaggle of kids begin to show up at the "club." School has just finished and before they go home, they have a daily appointment with Quintina.
About 13 years ago, the Altivas Canas Children's Project started. Quintina was a single mother with 3 kids at home. She couldn't work outside the home because she had to raise her children. It's a common struggle with single mothers. No different in Peru.     A little video highlighting the mission of Altivas Canas   She found herself waking up each morning dealing with the familial dilemma. However, there is something different about Quintina. She began to develop a way out of her predicament. She started knocking on doors in her neighborhood and found a bunch of other single moms, just like her, that were in the same situation. She came up with the concept of an afterschool program where she would open her home to the neighborhood kids with single moms. The kids would come to her house and before they would return to their respective homes in the evening, Quintina would make sure the kids finish all of their homework, burn out some energy in a healthy and loving environment, and eat a nutritious meal, most likely the only decent food they would eat all day.
Hangin' with some of my little buddies on the roof of the project
While the kids are off at school in the beginning of the day and at the club in the afternoon, the mothers are free to find full time work. Not only can the mothers earn a living to support their families, they also get the emotional satisfaction and esteem boost of being able to meet the needs of their kids. Quintina put this whole project together. She gets things done...That is why I work with her. I love the grass roots nature of her project. I love her heart and passion for each kid that passes through her doors. I love the humble and meek person that she is to work so hard for so many years just to make a difference in others.
If you want to win, you need to have a good team. I chose Quintina because she is a winner. I am an entrepreneur and business guy. I look at things through the eyes of an investor. I see Quintina as a sound and profitable place to invest resources. She is transparent, works hard, and is a good steward with whatever she has to work with.
MotoMission is a social enterprise that is designed to operate like any business, to provide a product or service to generate a profit. We operate high end dirtbike tours through the Andes of Peru. It's the most incredible place to ride, the trails are endless, and the experience is mind-blowing. We use well maintained professional equipment. We provide an exotic tour just exactly as I would want as a hard core enduro rider.
Kids working on homework
The platform of the business is to use 100% of the profits to fund an endowment that will pay for the monthly expenses of the children's project indefinitely into the future. Up to a few months ago, my family has been operating another social enterprise called The Meeting Place Cafe restaurant in downtown Cusco, Peru. The cafe has been providing the monthly needs for The Altivas Canas Project for a number of years now. While it sounds like a great program, the restaurant is not sustainable. It could potentially go out of business. Having an endowment is the long term sustainable solution to provide the needed resources 20 or 50 or more years into the future.
Enjoying a meal with the little ones
MotoMission is at the starting gate of funding the endowment. Through the generosity of many people, the fleet is ready for business. People like Craig at Western Power Sports/Fly Racing have been instrumental in making this business work. The customers that have paid for tours up to this point have all contributed to the mission as well. So many thanks to so many people.
I know this is not a high energy write up about a motorcycle tour in Peru. However, it is a wild motorcycle business adventure. The reason that this blog exists is to tell dirtbike related stories about Peru. If you want to be part of one of our stories, join up with us on a ride. You will see firsthand what I am talking about. The riding is world class. Then, to top it all off, you are contributing to an amazing project that supports the lives of a number of children and single mothers.

Yovana, one of the staff, and her little one at the project   I am going to put it out there that in order to fully fund the endowment, we need to book more tours. If you have ever thought about getting your riding buddies together for that "big" ride, this is it. Also, there are many of you out there with products or gear that we may be able to use. We put our bikes and gear through a lot of abuse. If you have a good connection to a product or gear that we could potentially use, please let me know. This whole business model is a team effort. We would love to have you on team. Follow this blog, share it to your Facebook pages, pass the word. It all helps to expand our reach.
I look forward to joining you on a ride in Peru!
Scott Englund
MotoMission Peru
If you want to see some of our ride videos, check out our Youtube page at MotoMission Peru Dirtbike Adventures. Also visit our website at www.motomissionperu.com to find more information about our tours and mission.

scottiedawg

scottiedawg

 

Step Into My Office

The Andes mountains of South America are my workplace. There is no better area in the world to ride dirtbikes. I have been operating tours and exploring the areas around the city for a number of years, and to no avail, am nowhere near reaching the end of each trail that has been discovered. I build a new list each time I operate a tour. In fact, the last tour included a number of brand new trails that had never been explored. While riding those newly charted routes, gazing across the canyon produced another five or six new trail options. I cannot imagine ever being able to put my tires on all of the potential trails. Don't get me wrong, I will certainly give it a go.   Step into my "office." Its good therapy!
 
The "Office"   I would consider myself a therapist. My medicine is what many people need. You leave my "office" with a whole new attitude, feeling content, and a renewed passion for the sport. My "office" is inviting. The mountains are enormous. From my house in Cusco at 11,000 feet, I can reach the closest mountain top at 14,300 feet in only 15 minutes. Life is full of ups and downs, but in my office, being in the deepest of valley produces the same enjoyment as the highest peaks. Its all good! I am trying to sound like a therapist here... Ridge to valley and back. Single track for days. You will never see another moto on these routes. That's my office! Is this the type of therapy you need?

A happy customer   If you are interested in a moto-therapy session,come to Peru. Joining MotoMission for an enduro ride will leave you feeling like a new person, This place is incredible. I would love you show you around. Also, keep in mind, that 100% of the proceeds from Motomission go to charity. I don't keep a penny of it. I do this as a volunteer entrepreneur. If you want to hear more about that, stay tuned for future blog posts. I will explain our business model in the future.

Ryan enjoying a good therapy session   Let the video do the talking. This tour just took place about a week ago. This guy was a solid rider. He jumped on and within a short time, he was ripping up the trail with a huge smile on his face. "Best views I have ever seen on a trail" is what Ryan had to say about the experience...therapeutic!   It was a spoiler...How will he ever go back and look at mountains the same way again? How will he ever ride a trail with government restrictions now that he has experienced the freedom that Peru offers? How will he ever be able to share a trail with other riders again? Completely spoiled...my office awaits.

Crossing a 15K foot pass   Make sure to watch the video above, then be sure to schedule an appointment ...   Scott Englund, CLMT(Certified Licensed MotoTherapist)   Scott Englund, along with his family, operates MotoMission Peru, a high end enduro tour operation in Cusco, Peru, South America. He and his family are volunteers who operate businesses that give 100% of the profits to local social projects in the area. They are a dirtbike family doing what they love. For more information about our mission, check out our website at www.motomissionperu.com.

scottiedawg

scottiedawg

 

Filling Up At The Pump

How Residual Pump Fuel Affects Your Fill Up
This week I have a quick tip I want to share with you regarding buying fuel and filling up gas cans for your bikes. I know many of you, myself included, rely on premium grade gasoline dispensed from local gas station pumps to put endless grins on your faces. One of the downfalls of gas station pumps is that fuel from the previous sale is left in the hose. According to the American Petroleum Institute, the amount of fuel left in a gas pump's hose is around 1/3 of a gallon.   Generally speaking, when two fuels are blended the octane rating of the resulting fuel is approximately the average of the two fuels. So if you had a gallon of 87 octane and a gallon of 93 the resulting blend would have an octane rating of 90. I'll be the first to admit that 1/3 of a gallon of fuel added to a two gallon gas can won't have much effect on the octane rating. For those of you that like numbers, 0.33 of a gallon of 87 added to 1.67 gallons of 93 will yield the following octane rating:   0.33 gallon of 87 / 2 gallons = 16.5% of the total mixture
1.67 gallons of 93 /2 gallons = 83.5% of the total mixture   (0.165 x 87) + (0.835 x 93) = 92 octane blended fuel   So in a two gallon can, the octane rating of the fuel has dropped a point due to the 1/3 gallon of 87 in the pump hose. Unless you have a very well developed performance engine, this isn't anything to lose sleep over. I think a bigger reasons to want to keep that 1/3 of a gallon out of your can is due to the possibility of ethanol being in the hose from the previous sale. Many articles can be found outlining why ethanol should be avoided, but the main reasons include part corrosion due to the exposure to alcohol, rubber seals and o-rings may not be compatible with ethanol resulting in swelling and failure, and some plastics deteriorate when exposed to ethanol. Not to mention ethanol contains less energy than gasoline. Again, we're not talking about a large percentage of ethanol in the overall scheme of things but I prefer to stay away from the stuff when I can.   Fueling Tip
I'm very careful about what I run through my powersport engines. To safeguard against filling up a fuel can with residual fuel from the previous sale, I like to donate the first gallon of "premium" to my vehicle before filling my gas cans. This ensures whatever fuel was in the hose and pump is flushed out and that I'm filling up my cans with premium. If you are borderline OCD about what goes in your engines like I am, you may consider adopting this practice.   I suspect many of you have other tips and tricks regarding fueling. Leave a comment below and share your thoughts and experiences so other motorheads can benefit!   Book News
I also wanted to invite you to check out my book on how to build four-stroke engines, which is now officially available in print form. It took a ton of work to bring the print book together and get the right help on board. The project hasn't been easy, but I'm proud to offer this book to you and can assure you it will make a great addition to your workshop. You can learn more about the book by following this link: The Four Stroke Handbook   To celebrate the arrival of the print book, I'm running a sale until the 27th of September offering all versions of the book at a 20% discount. After the 27th the sale will end and the price will go up. If you've got a build coming up now or in the future and are interested in the book, now is a great time to pick up a copy.   Thanks for reading and have a great week!
-Paul  

Paul Olesen

Paul Olesen

 

3 Things to Avoid When Peaking for a Race

1. Getting sick: as you get closer to your race (especially the last week), you need to kick into overdrive your hygiene habits. Wash your hands regularly, keep them covered in anti-bacteria gel, stay hydrated, load up on immunity supporting foods and supplements, use a netty pot two times a day (morning and evening).   2. Too much time: as you taper down your training, your volume should be coming down and your intensity should be going up. As your volume of training time comes down, you are left with a surplus of "idle time". Use this time to sleep, eat or get a massage.   3. Squeezing in one more hard workout: the body will ALWAYS perform better if you come into an event rested and hungry to compete. If you squeeze in one more hard workout (out of doubt and fear), you run the risk of dumping your best potential in training instead of racing.   Yours in sport and health,
-Coach Robb  

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

7 Rules for Recovering Quickly from an Illness

The body provides you many indicators that it is fatigued and susceptible to illness: elevated heart rate, high body temperature, suppressed appetite, declines in athletic performance, poor sleeping patterns and more. Though these indicators may seem obvious as you read them, most riders will not acknowledge that if the body doesn't get the elements necessary to recover and overcome fatigue: sleep & food, it is inevitable that an illness (and an injury) is right around the corner.  
Here are 7 Rules for a speedy recovery from an illness:
Rule #1: Listen to your body.
The body is an efficient machine, a fever or elevated heart rates are clear signs that you should back off on both your intensity and duration of riding and cross training. Please email me if you would like a free copy of the MotoE Body Analysis Spreadsheet to easily track this data on a weekly basis.   Rule #2: Get more rest.
Resting does not mean going for a one hour riding session or a two-hour spin on your bike hoping it’ll make you feel better – it will only make you more fatigued. Your goal is to get 7-9 hours of deep, high quality sleep each day. Avoid watching TV before going to bed and make the room as dark and cold as possible.   Rule #3: Pay attention to diet and proper hydration.
Make it easy on your body to go about its job of fighting off the infection or virus by loading it up with vitamins and minerals through fruits and vegetables. Regarding hydration, every day consume half of your body weight in ounces of water (160 pounds/2=80 ounces of water per day). Proper nutrition would involve eating every two hours and eating fruits, vegetables and lean protein at every meal or snack. Please email me if you would like a free copy of the MotoE’s Food & Performance Log to easily track this data on a weekly basis.   Rule #4: Return to training gently.
As you start to feel better and your resting heart rate is back to normal for five days, resist the urge to jump back into training full-throttle. As a general rule of thumb, if your resting heart rate is up by more than 5 beats over your weekly average, then don’t train at all for that day. If your heart rate is within 3 beats of your weekly average, then exercise at a very easy effort level for 45 minutes or less. As you can see, knowing your resting heart rate in the morning is an important variable to use when it comes to health & performance. Please email me if you would like a free copy of the MotoE’s Body Analysis Log to easily track this data on a weekly basis.   Rule #5: Don’t ignore the obvious signs from your body.
If your heart rate spikes straight up getting out of your car or you don’t have an appetite, then following your normal volume & intensity of training does not make sense. This physical experience will correlate with your resting heart rate (see #4 above).   Rule #6: Don’t expect someone else to be able to tell you what you should and shouldn’t do.
Unfortunately you’re training partner, riding coach; family, spouse, etc., doesn’t actually know how you are feeling, so it’s up to you to make the correct decision for yourself (based off of non-emotional evaluation tools: resting heart rate, hours and quality of sleep, suppressed appetite).

Rule #7: Don’t become an internet doctor.
Google can be a wonderful tool, but even the most rational among us can turn into raging hypochondriacs if let loose on the internet when feeling sick. Before you know it, your bout of strep throat has escalated to some rare form of infectious disease. So make an appointment with a legit medical doctor who understands how important your health is to you along with your desire to get back on the bike ASAP!   Eating to Avoid an Illness
Training (both on and off of the bike) is intended to improve your strength & endurance; however, this improvement only happens when you eat correctly immediately after your workouts and races. Immediately after a hard day of racing (or training), your immune system is suppressed and your overall body is fatigued, this makes you vulnerable to an airborne virus.   To improve your immunity, eat green fruits and vegetables & every meal. The main ingredient found in fruits and vegetables are phytonutrients. These are substances that plants produce naturally to protect themselves. Additionally, they provide the plant's color, aroma, texture, and flavor.   Oxidative stress and inflammation, a byproduct of high intensity or long bouts of prolonged exercise, increase the production of free radicals, which can cause further cell damage. Antioxidants act to combat these free radicals. Therefore, recovery nutrition must entail much more than simply consuming post-workout carbohydrates and protein. Consuming foods that are rich in vitamins, minerals, and essential fatty acids also speed the recovery process.   While it's necessary to supplement your diet with over-the-counter multivitamins and fish oils, consuming whole foods that are rich in antioxidants and omega-3 fatty acids need to be the foundation of your nutrition. Food is intended to provide macro- and micronutrients, including fiber that you just can't get in a pill.   According to a 2006 study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the top 50-antioxidant rich foods included 13 spices, eight fruits and vegetables, five types of berries, and four different nuts and seeds. So why not include some of the following antioxidant-rich foods in your daily diet?   Ginger, cloves, cinnamon, curry, and garlic
Each of these boast anti-inflammatory properties and bold flavors to go with any type of meal, be it sweet or savory. Sauté your favorite vegetables with a bit of garlic and curry powder, or add a dash of cinnamon to your oatmeal.   Blackberries, strawberries, cranberries, blueberries, and red raspberries
These berries are packed with vitamins A, C, E and beta-carotene. They're also rich in the minerals potassium and magnesium. They can be tossed into salads for a taste of something sweet, or as a topping for your favorite yogurt. Got berries? Snack away!   Artichokes, sweet potatoes, spinach, red bell peppers, asparagus, and red cabbage
These veggies are jam packed with vitamins, minerals, fiber, and flavor. Cooking them only enhances their antioxidant properties. In fact, researchers found that a cooked sweet potato has 413 percent more antioxidant properties than when raw.   Quinoa
Though considered a grain, quinoa is actually a relative of green leafy vegetables like spinach and Swiss chard. Its low glycemic, and the only “grain” that contains all nine essential amino acids, making it a complete protein (7 grams per half-cup cooked). It's also rich in manganese and copper, two minerals required as cofactors for the production of antioxidants. What’s more? It's ready to eat in just 10 minutes.   Walnuts
Walnuts are an excellent source of micro- and macronutrients like protein, fiber, and omega-3 fat. In fact, just one ounce of walnuts (that's a shot glass or small handful) contains the recommended daily value, or 2.5 grams, of the essential amino acid alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). As if that wasn’t enough, once ingested, ALA is metabolized and converted to EPA and DHA (the kind of omega-3's found in fish). The walnut is a rock star in the world of antioxidants. Add it to salads, yogurt, and protein/vegetable dishes.   Cross training, riding and racing is demanding and places the body under a great deal of metabolic stress. A daily diet rooted (no pun intended) in nutrient dense foods will play an integral role in both your recovery and enhanced immunity. While a post-workout recovery drink is vitally important in replenishing muscle glycogen and aiding in muscle repair, a diet that focuses on antioxidants will help to minimize the cellular damage that can be caused by the oxidative stress of free radicals. Allowed to roam freely, free radicals can very subtly damage muscle tissue and negatively affect your speed & endurance.   Thank you for taking the time to read this article, if you have any questions about your current program or would like MotoE to create a customized mental, nutrition and performance program for you, please email me directly.   Yours in sport and health,
-Coach Robb    

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

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