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About this blog

Helping riders who are serious about mastering the motocross riding techniques necessary to ride fast, smooth, and in control.

Entries in this blog

Gary Semics
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Sure, it's fun to put some laps in on a motocross track. But, you'll fall short of your potential if you're not using this key practice law of practicing important techniques separately. This is true for motocross cornering skills as well as motocross jumping skills. Did you know that riding really well requires mastering as many as 55 separate techniques, all laced seamlessly together?

 

 

If you'd like more of my riding tips, browse my blog here on ThumperTalk or my website. If you'd like to be notified when I post new riding tips, subscribe by clicking the "follow" button (upper right). :thumbsup:

Gary Semics
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Hey TT'ers, here's a short video I did that breaks down the techniques & skills necessary to maximize your speed & control through flat, slippery corners. Give it a watch and post up any questions that you have for me (comments section below). I'll do my best to point you in the right direction.

How's your flat corning speed & control? What's giving you the most trouble? Let's get a good discussion going on this topic; it's an important one if you want to win races. ;)

 



If you'd like more of my riding tips, browse my blog here on ThumperTalk or my website at http://gsmxs.com If you'd like to be notified when I post new riding tips, subscribe by clicking the "follow" button (upper right). :thumbsup:

Gary Semics
Professional MX Trainer
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Gary Semics
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Hitting your landing target is critical in motocross. It is also better for your health! ;) Not only hitting your landing, but getting there quickly is also important. The two most common techniques regarding jumping are absorbing the take off to stay low and launching the take off to clear an obstacle, to make it to the landing.

Here's a stop/slow motion riding video where I point out the important techniques:

If you'd like more riding tips, be sure to click the "Follow this Bog" button in the upper right of the screen. Then you'll be automatically notified of my new entries.

Gary :ride:

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More MX Training Resources

Gary Semics Motocross Technique DVDs.

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Gary Semics
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Here are two basic tips that will help you increase your motocross corning speed. They're are not difficult, but as many as 90% of c riders don't do them! If you want to win, mastering cornering techniques is crucial.

This video demonstrates the common differences between a C and B rider. Learn about corning techniques and more from my free riding tips and Technique DVDs and Streams at:http://www.motocrossdvds.com

Gary Semics

Pro Motorcross Trainer

Follow me by clicking on "follow this blog" in the upper right corner. Then you'll be notified when I post new tips.

I believe my sponsors have the best products and services in the industry. That's why I've stayed with them for so long and I'm grateful they have stayed with me.

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Gary Semics
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While the Pro Motocross races sleep for the winter, Pro Supercross comes to the forefront. If you're like me, you're looking forward to watching SX on the telli! :applause:

Have a look at this video to see how two pros are practicing for SX. As a professional MX trainer and coach, how do I train these top level racers regarding their riding techniques?

If you'd like to follow along, click the "follow this blog" button in the upper right. Then you'll be notified of new entries. :thumbsup:

Gary Semics Motocross Technique DVDs.

I believe my sponsors have the best products and services in the industry. That's why I've stayed with them for so long and I'm grateful they have stayed with me.

Alpinestars

Dunlop

Fox

Factory Connection

Renthal

Maxima

Scott

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Wiseco

Works Connection

Black Ops Moto

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Ripped Vinyl

Gary Semics

Too Cold to Ride?

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Well, that depends on how bad you want to ride. When I was in my early teens I rode year round in Ohio. In the winter months I usually rode once or twice a week and raced most weekends in harescramble events. I remember many times when there was snow and the ground was frozen solid. The AMA didn't allow studded tires in Ohio but we still raced. Harescrambles are like a GNCC race but are two hours instead of three. I was fortunate by my late teens I could stay in FL or CA during the winter months to practice and race. But now at the rip age of 60 when the snow flies here in OH I'm happy to just be training inside. Not inside as in indoor Area Cross tracks but inside as in Gym. This way when I start riding again it only takes a few days to get comfortable on the bike.

I realize that I'm somewhat of a rare bird, being addicted to training. I know a lot of people who don't train and seem to be content and happy. I guess they have large amounts of serotonin (the feel good neurotransmitter) floating around in their brain. I must have missed the lineup for that one. I guess I have to exert myself through some sort of exercise to get my buzz on. I have also realized that even those serotonin rich individuals feel better when they exercise, at least some sort of exercise regularly. Of course it's more difficult to find time to exercise with things like work, family and all the other things life throws our way on a day to day bases pulls us away from personal time. Exercise is the last thing on most people's minds. For many even the word "exercise" steers up painful feelings.

Exercise is way more popular these days than when I was growing up. Back then kids were naturally busy playing outside, doing sports and for many like myself also working outside. I didn't have far to go because I lived on a farm. I knew kids from school who had part time jobs (especially in the summer) for farmers, including my dad's farm. Most adults were so busy with manual labor jobs that they didn't have the time or energy to even think about exercise. Those people who had office jobs smoked and had no interest in being active. This was all before the new health craze, now at least people know the facts regarding what's bad for health and what's good. Back then most people didn't have a clue. What's mind blowing is even now when people know most still ignore the facts.

I may have ended up in the same boat if I hadn't found such a strong passion in motocross. It was when I was 15 and 16 that I discovered I needed to train and eat right if I wanted to win races. Back then we ran three 30 minute motos at the bigger races and even the local races were pretty long. At many of these bigger races after the third moto I would be so exhausted I couldn't even stand up for more then five minutes. I would start throwing up and then start dry heaving if I stood up, sometimes for the rest of the evening. A few times at hot races this would happen after the 2nd moto and I still had one more to go. These episodes happened because I was too nervous to eat all day. At the same time once the gate dropped and the adrenalin kicked in I was wide open until the checkered flag, never feeling how tired I was until I got off the bike and settled down. Then it would hit me and the dreaded episode would begin. After these races I just wanted to go to bed. Thankfully I always felt okay the next morning. Talk about learning the hard way, I knew early on I had to take an interest in exercise and nutrition.

I have to admit for the first year or two I hated exercising. I would be hard after it for a week or two and then stop for a few weeks or month. Then back at it again. This went on as I kept being reminded by occasional bouts of throwing up and dry heaves. After about two years the lifestyle of training had set in. I wouldn't say I enjoyed it but I kept doing it regularly. I wasn't getting sick at races and my results improved. By this time I was racing against the best racers in the world and they were also training. I know I would have never gotten even that far if I didn't make training a part of my lifestyle. The interesting thing is that the thing I hated in my late teens (training) is still a big part of my life today. I can honestly say I love it. I don't always love or even like pushing through a hard training section but I do love the way I feel when it's done. And that good feeling last until the next day or two when I do it again.

For you young guns who want to become a successful racer you have to accept the fact that training is a primary key in the job description. For those of you that don't have your sights set on a racing career, training, at least some training, is still part of the job. If you're alive and breathing oxygen exercise is still part of the job, still part of being alive. Embrace it!

If you think you don't have time, stop using that excuse. Put a bicycle on a trainer in front of a TV and work up a sweat at least 3 times a week. Come spring you'll be glad you did. It's all the way you look at it. If you're developed negative thoughts and feeling about exercise start replacing them with positive thoughts about training. Soon the positive feelings will be there also.

Send your questions and comments below. If you can use some motivation I have some for you. Whatever you need just ask.

If you're not already following my blogs you can do so by clicking "follow this blog" in the upper right corner. Then you'll receive a notification email each time I post a new blog.

GS

Gary Semics
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Motocross rhythm jumps are all about carrying speed and staying low. Don't be caught slowing down between the jumps and wasting time in the air. Understand it, be able to do it correctly and then do it correctly through repetition! That is the key to learning anything new. The two main techniques in this video tip get the job done. For more info on rhythm jumps and Scrubbing and Whipping click here.

Click "follow this blog" in the upper right corner to get an email notice when I post a new blog.

Gary Semics
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It can be difficult at times to keep coming up with interesting content that most of you want to know about. Please comment to this blog and give me some ideas of what you'd like me to address??? Like what riding tips? Training off the bike? Diet and Nutrition? Mental Toughness? You name it, I'll cover it.

Follow my blog in the upper right corner.

I believe my sponsors have the best products and services in the industry. That's why I've stayed with them for so long and I'm grateful they have stayed with me.

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Ride hard, ride smart,

Gary Semics

Gary Semics
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Training off the bike for motocross has become popular these days. But some of the methods used can be bad for your riding skills if not done properly. For example, regular push ups and especially pull ups are not so good. Watch this video to learn why. Go to this link in order to learn a lot more. http://www.gsmxs.com/category/dvds/stand-alone-technique-dvds

Click on "follow this blog" in the upper right corner and you'll get an email notice when I post new blogs.

Gary Semics
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First learning to jump a dirt bike or bicycle is fun and exciting but at the same time can be pretty scary as well. Here's my strategy for first timers. Basically it's starting out small and repeating it through repetition, moving up gradually as you improve. In this video I'm learning to jump a mountain bike. Try not to laugh too hard.

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Gary Semics
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Have you seen the pros wheelieing over a small jump? It's a big time saver. This short video will show you with slow motion and freeze frames just how it's done. For all the motocross jumping techniques click the links below for these DVDs or Streams. Don't go through the "School of Hard Knocks" learn the right ways from the get go!

http://www.gsmxs.com/dvds/volume-3/dvd-6-motocross-basic-jumping-techniques

http://www.gsmxs.com/dvds/volume-3/vo3-dvd-7-motocross-absorb-scrub-whip-jumping-techniques

http://www.gsmxs.com/latest-gs-news/vo3-dvd-8-motocross-jumping-absorbing-scrubbing-and-whipping-techniques-preview

Join my blogs in the upper right corner.

Ride hard and smart,

Gary Semics

Gary Semics
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With another Des Nations having just completed, I thought it would be a good time to bring up this story from a past Des Nations. There won’t be any fancy bells and whistles in this story, what you are about to read is what actually happened.

It was late August 1977, and at that time there was a Motocross (500cc) and Trophee Des Nations (250cc). I was selected for the US team on Kawasaki along with Steve Stackable (Maico), Kent Howerton (Husqvarna) and Tony Distefano (Suzuki). Yes, there were also four riders at that time instead of three. We all just finished a long year of racing all the Supercrosses and Nationals. As a matter of fact, we had just raced two hot 45 minute motos of the 500 National in St. Petersburg, Florida, on Sunday and Monday morning we were on a plane to New York where we would make our connecting flight to Paris, France. The following Sunday would be the first race in the south of France, Bordeaux, and then the next Sunday would be the Trophee Des Nations in Markelo, Holland.

I had never been to Europe before, and I don’t think any of the other riders or mechanics had either. But that wouldn’t matter because when we arrived in Paris I would be on my own. You see, back in 1977, it wasn’t that people didn’t think the Americans had a chance at the Motocross Des Nations and Trophy Des Nations, they knew we didn’t have a chance. I guess it was just something that the AMA did to see where we stood. And besides, the AMA official was getting an interesting vacation, if nothing else. This AMA official, who’s name escapes me, was suppose to be our organizer and team captain, like Roger DeCoster has been in the more recent past. When Roger goes over with the American team he uses his resources to have practice tracks for the team to train on that are similar to the racetrack. They operate as one team and every detail is planned out. We were four riders who were sent to Europe to do these two races and figure the details out when we got there. Some of the mechanics came with us, and some would meet up with us later. My mechanic, Rick Jones, would be there later. We weren’t worry about testing and practicing in order to get ready for the race. We were more concerned with just making it to the race.

Things seemed to be going pretty good...pretty good that is, until we arrived at the JFK Airport in New York. We were all supposed to fly to Paris together. Then from the Paris Airport Husky rider Kent Howerton and his mechanic Eric Crippa would fly all the way to Sweden to the Husky factory. I really don’t remember what Tony D did, but he must have gone with them because he sure wasn’t with me. After they were in Sweden for most of the week they would take a ferry all the way to the south of France for the race. Yea, that’s right a ferry, as in ferry boat. I thought that was incredibly stupid, but that was what they were doing. Steve Stackable and I had our plan to fly from Paris to Bordeaux, where the race was, relax and get rested up for the race. So everything’s cool, we’re standing in line at the ticket counter at JFK when I look at Steve, my traveling buddy, and I see a face as white as a sheet, stricken with FEAR! Steve couldn’t find his passport, and realized he had left it at the motel in Florida. He quickly called his brother Rolf and had it mailed, next day air, to New York. This was not good. Now I would have to go from Paris to Bordeaux, get a rental car in Bordeaux, and find the motel alone. I had never been to Europe before and didn’t speak anything but English with an accent. Steve and I planned to meet there a few days later. This wouldn’t have been so bad if we were going on a joy ride, but we kind of had a little bit of a job to do, like represent the US in the biggest motocross race in the world.

It was morning when we arrived in Paris, and I had no luck sleeping on the long flight. This is where the US Team split. Howerton, Crippa, and the rest of the crew flew to Sweden and I flew to Bordeaux. It was difficult enough finding my way around the Paris Airport, but after a while I finally arrived in Bordeaux. It took a long time to get a rental car, but I was happy to be on my way to the motel and out of the airport. The only problem was that I didn’t know how to get to the motel. I must have stopped to ask directions 15 times. I picked up three hitchhikers and after five hours of driving I was still lost. All these little roads that I was driving on were unmarked and when I came to a town it was a free-for-all getting through the intersections. It was late in the afternoon by now, so I guess it was their rush hour and there were no traffic rules. I don’t know how it is now but in those days hardly anyone in the south of France spoke English. It was starting to get real weird. I had just finished the last National of the year, and I was thinking that I should be back home in California, kicking back by the pool instead of driving around lost in France. We only had a few weeks off before the twelve-race Trans Am Series would be starting back in the states. As I keep trying to find my way, I noticed one of those advertising posters for motorcycle races in a bakery window. I went in and found a nice old lady who spoke some English. She knew about the motocross race and had me follow her to the promoter’s house. I thanked her and was happy to finally have some contact of where I was suppose to be. The promoter was a big jolly man who was also happy to see me. I had been up for about 36 hours so I really just wanted to beeline it to the motel and go to sleep, but I thought I should be sociable as he invited me into his house. He wanted to have a bite to eat and drink some wine, then he wanted to drive me to the track to have a look. We made the short drive and I saw something that I thought I would never see. I saw a track that had a surface harder than Carlsbad or the old Saddleback tracks in the middle of the week in August. This track was literally rock on top of rock. There were sections that had no dirt at all. The ground was made of layers of rock, and in some places there were loose rocks on top of the layered rock. I just came from a sand track in Florida and I’m thinking, "Huh, this is different, now can you take me to the motel?"

I arrived at the motel as the sun was setting. Well, it wasn’t exactly a motel. It was a castle from the 16th century located way out in the middle of nowhere, surrounded by forest and grape vineyards. As I hammered on this huge front door with a ten-pound ring hammer it swung open and there stood a man who said something like, good evening won’t you come into my house. Images of vampire movies started running through my mind. I started thinking stuff like this is all a mistake, I’m in the wrong place this could be some kind of vampire castle. I know, I know, it sounds stupid but everything in that place was just like the old vampire movies. The big open rooms in the lobby area and long darken hallways, the art on the walls, the winding balconies, the dry sink and foot thick window seals in my room, the whole place had this eerie feel about it. Another strange thing was that there wasn’t anybody else around. There was just the guy who opened the door and me, that’s it. I knew I wasn’t going anywhere so I put my imagination to rest and rationalized the situation out and went to bed hoping that I would wake up in the morning. After about 15 hours of solid sleep I woke up to the sound of chickens. I swung the heavy hinged windows open from the thick window seal and gazed out across the beautiful gardens of the castle from the first story to see a bright sunny day. I thought great, I’m still alive and I’m here.

Now what do I do? It’s only Tuesday morning, I don’t race until Sunday and I’m out here in the middle of nowhere at a castle. I wasn’t going to drive anywhere, because I had nowhere to go and sure didn’t want to get lost again. I just hung out and ran through the vineyards for some exercise while I waited for Steve and the others to arrive. After a few days Steve showed up. Man, was I glad to see him. Now I had someone to do nothing with. We just hung out and ran farther through the vineyards, far enough to come close to an old farmhouse and get chased by a couple of big dogs.

Sometime towards the end of the week the rest of the group showed up. We all eat meals together outside in the garden and took a guided tour of the old castle as our guide explained its history. That was about it for the castle, it was almost race time.

I was glad to find myself in the familiar surrounding of the race on Sunday. As I said before it was a hard, rocky track. It was so hard and rocky that I broke a front hub on the 380 Works Kaw in practice. Neither my mechanic nor I had ever seen that before. Rick changed the front wheel and I was back out trying to figure the track out and get comfortable on it. After practice they had the very organized opening ceremonies that go on at big races in Europe, even bigger at the Motocross and Trophee Des Nations. After all that it was time to get down to business. Each four-man team (country) had to qualify. I don’t remember exactly how we qualified but I do remember that we qualified pretty well. For those of you who would like to know more about the race I’ll have to apologize. That was 24 years and many races ago and I don’t remember the details. I do remember that we finished 2nd overall. That was really good for the Americans at the time. We were all pretty happy with the way things turned out in Bordeaux and looking forward to next week’s race in Marelo, Holland.

We flew into Amsterdam. Man, what a change, going from this Castle in the country to an off the hook city like Amsterdam. Some of us split up, Howerton was the only guy there with his wife (Jill) so they went sight seeing or something. Tony D. wasn’t with us so he must have went with the other group. I was, I guess you could say, in the adventure group, Stackable, Crippa and my mechanic Rick Jones. We had a lot of time to be adventurous. We had nowhere to practice or do anything like that, so we had the rest of the week to wait for race day.

I remember one day for lunch we went into a restaurant in the city. We were tired of guessing things off the menu that we couldn’t read, so there were four people eating at a near by table and we all just said we’ll have the same as them. What the heck, it looked pretty good and it was. After the meal we were pretty proud of our technique. The waitress brings the bill and after we converted the Dutch guilders to US currency we were amazed that we just spent over $150.00 for lunch. 24 years ago that was a lot of money.

Then one night the four of us were walking around in town checking things out. We asked a local what there was to do around here. He told us to follow him. Where we were going was supposed to be a nightclub type deal. We started following him on foot and pretty soon were looking at each other thinking where is this guy taking us. We’re going through all these back alleys and old sandy streets. Some of the old buildings were propped up with big telephone poles because they were starting to sink into the sand. Finally we all go into this building and before we realized where we were a bunch of guys are trying to talk to us. By the time we figure out that they are trying to sell us drugs we realize that just about all the 30 plus people in this dump are tripping out. They are either withdrawing and freaking out for a fix or tripping. These guys trying to get some cash from us are not taking no for an answer. They implied that either we buy some of their goods or we may not be leaving. There were too many of them and we did see knifes, so we decided to play it safe and buy some of their fake dope so we could all leave in one piece. After we were back out in breathable oxygen we all had a good laugh about how stupid we were. That’s about all I remember from that week leading up to the race.

On race day we find ourselves on the extreme opposite type of track conditions from the last week in Bordeaux. Now I knew that Holland was sandy, but I didn’t know just how sandy that could be. The Marelo track made the Florida tracks seem smooth. It was a track that started in a big open field area. Then right at the end of the long start straight it made the traditional Holland sand track feature of going into the woods. Then the entire track would wind around through the woods until it returned into the open start area for some nice sweeping corners than head back into the woods again, not a very good spectator track. As the track wore on through practice we could see that it was different than anything we had seen before. Where the sand was a little more toward the harder side the bumps were getting deep, but closer together and not nearly as deep as where the sand was very soft and bottomless. In these areas the bumps were very deep and far apart. They were more like giant whoops. By the 2nd moto they would be so deep that if a rider and bike went down into one he would disappear. I don’t mean if he fell over, I mean he would disappear while he was still on two wheels. In order to go fast across these sections you would have to stay in 4th gear and jump from the top of one to the next, and the next, and the next and so on. At the same time the track was lined with trees. Many of these trees were about 3 foot in diameter with wire about 3 inches deep in the tree marking the track. That’s how long the track had been there, the tree grew over the wire. It took me most of practice to become comfortable brushing by shoulder on tree bark while pinned through the sand.

Did I mention that the Motocross Des Nations in Bordeaux was an open class race and the Trophy Des Nations in Marelo was a 250 race? Anyway, our team qualified. I don’t exactly remember what position we qualified but I don’t think it was as good as we qualified on the hard packed track in Bordeaux.

The starting gate in Markelo was ahead of its time. Back at that time all the gates were just one big forward falling gate. But, this gate had individual single T gates that fell straight down into the ground (a cement foundation). If you went too early you would hit the gate and cause it to stop from falling into the ground. I felt confident that I could win the start. I just had that old familiar feeling that I was going to win the start. When I had that feeling it was like I had a patent on the holeshot, the patented holeshot. And sure enough the old patent came through again. Going into the woods I was in the lead, but I just couldn’t hang with two of the Euros who started right behind me. They soon passed me and were beginning to pull away. Then Roger DeCoster was trying to pass me for third. I thought to let him by so I could follow him and learn his lines. But right after that my 250 Works Kaw had enough of the power sucking sand and blew a head gasket. I nursed it back to the pits and watched the rest of the team try to salvage the US effort.

In the 2nd moto I remember spoding around the roughest track with shocks that for some reason would only go half way down. I wish this story had a happy, heroic, ending but that only happens in the movies. The US didn’t do so well at the 1977 Trophy Des Nations in Markelo, Holland. But we did take home the experience that continued to grow and eventually helped to make the US a motocross power that knows no such word as impossible, and accepts no such end as failure.

The times they will keep a changin'!

Gary Semics
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Is cycling really good for motocross training? After a four month training experiment, using myself as the ginny pig, the results are in. Watch this 12 minute video to understand how cycling effected my moto riding results and much more. You have to be willing to suffer on the bicycle or is it really suffering???

Don't do all that hard training unless you are sure you're doing the most effective training for motocross, training that will bring the results you're hoping for. Get all this how to training info and tons of other facts about fitness for motos like:

- How much training is too much and not enough, how to balance that fine line?

- What's a good weekly routine, for me in my situation, to be doing each week? Get many sample weekly routine examples for weekend warriors to full time pros.

- What's the best ways to eliminate arm pump?

- Should I train or rest when I'm starting to get sick?

- How important is nutrition and what is practical?

- Don't have a lot of time to train, what's the most effective exercises for fast results?

Get all these facts and many more with my "MX Conditioning 2 DVD or Stream".

You'll also get a 62 page Training and Nutrition Manual in PDF format. All on sale at a 20% discount. Use this Thumper Talk code for an additional 10% off: TTGSMXS58.

With winter closing in this is the perfect time to start training or upgrade your current workouts.

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Get the inside lines to the methods and strategies I used to train McGrath, Windham, Lusk, Dowd and many others. All the riders I've trained have won 26 AMA Pro Titles. Now you can get all this info to use for yourself.

Gary; thanks for your personal help throughout my career. Your methods and strategies made my practice and training time much more effective. (Jeremy McGrath)

Join my TT Blog in the upper right corner.

Gary Semics

Training Experiment

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How will I feel on the moto bike after almost a month off. Instead of motos I've been bicycling.

As you may know from my last Blog both of my moto bikes have been down. I'm finally getting one back together and plan to ride some motos tomorrow. Up until the time I didn't have a bike to ride I was riding my normal amount. About once a week I'd ride two twenty minute motos. The last time I rode was August 17. Yes I keep a training log. On August 26 and 27th I rode a little because I had to do a lesson for a new Certified Instructor but I really don't count those two days as riding because I didn't ride enough to even begin to get tired.

In the mean time, back in May, I started Road Cycling a lot and have logged almost 600 miles. Lately I started adding mtn biking as well. I've done some upper body work also but not much. On these bicycle rides I've really been pushing hard for an average of about an hour. Two rides were 2 hours and many about 1.5 hours. I worn a heart rate monitor so I could see how hard I'm training. My average HR has been between 143 and 148. That's between 87 and 90% of my max. That's the average of the entire time.

I'm looking forward to doing some motos again to see how I feel on the bike. I'll post the results to this blog as soon as I have some news. I plan this next blog will be video.

You can comment below and/or join my blog in the upper right corner.

Talk again soon,

Gary

Gary Semics

Both Bikes Down

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I have a 2012 and 2013 KX250F. If you have Kaws you need to know this. I had the 2012 up for sale but then I found out the clutch bearings on the main clutch shaft need replaced and this means splitting the cases. The clutch makes a howling noise at an idle. When the clutch is pulled it the noise stops. I figured I would have to either fix it or tell the buyer about the problem and knock off some $$$. A guy called me from MI and really wanted the bike until I told him about the clutch issue. But I'm still sleeping well at night.

I wasn't in a big hurry to sell the bike as I had my 2013 to ride until a few weeks ago. This 2013 bike has 38 hours so I finally got around to doing a fresh top end. After I did all that I had an idea to once and for all find out why the rear wheel is hard to spin. It's always kind of dragged when spinning it, like to oil the chain. I just thought this drag was created when I tighten the axel. To find the cause I spun the rear wheel with the axel loose, still dragged. Then I disconnected the chain and there we go, no drag. Just for good measure I tighten the axel and still no drag at all.

Next I called the best mechanic I know (George Baybor in Brooksville FL). Oh yea, I've seen Kaws do that before, said George. It's the brass bushing on third gear. Then he told me what I didn't want to hear. It will lock up, be careful. That's the exact same thing he told me about the 2012 bike's clutch noise.

I haven't motoed for 3 weeks accept for two days a week ago in order to test a Motocross Instructor who was becoming a GSMXS Certified instructor. Julio Chiang Nicolini passed and became my first Certified Instructor. Julio is from Lima Peru. I rode the 2012 and took the chance with the clutch bearing issue. It was fine but that noise made me not rev it too much. I really like that bike and just may keep it as a collector's bike. After all I did win all 3 motos on it in the 50 Masters Class at Loretta's 2012.

I'm the kind of person who has to physically exhaust myself at least every other day. I don't moto every other day anymore. To get my moto fix I'm more like a one or two days a week guy. The other days I do some exercise like: running, cycling or high rep - low weight exercises. What saved me from wigging out about not motoing has been cycling. About three months before these m/c bike issues began I started getting into road cycling a lot more. I've always done some road and mountain cycling for training but never until last May with a good road bike, shoes, pedals and all the other trick gear. By the way Fox's line of Mtn bike gear works well for road cycling also and it's awesome stuff. It helps that I live on a country road two miles from an awesome Rails to Trails bike trail. I've made a bunch of loops off the trail on country roads so I have a lot of different routes. Most of my rides are around 20 miles, 33 is the longest so far. I did 21.99 miles today in a time of 1:25 at an average speed of 15.5. I know that's not great but for me at 60 it's pretty hard. There's a lot of hills and some of the roads are a little rough. Just like motoing I don't enjoy riding slow or easy. I've been pushing hard on my bike loops. My average HR is usually 144 to 146 and that's 87 to 89% of Max. By the old basic scale of subtracting your age from 220 my max would be 160. But on a ride last week while pushing hard on a long hill I reached 165.

Cycling has been filling the void of not motoing. If you have already been into cycling you know what I mean, if not you should give it a try and see what you've been missing. Of course it's very good for your conditioning so you're endurance will improve in the motos as well. Don't be stubborn like I was, get a good bike, pedals and shoes. It makes a hugh difference.

You can comment below. Ask questions or share some of your experiences. Oh and join my Blog in the upper right corner. That way you'll be notified when I post a new blog.

If you'd really like to improve your conditioning for motoing consider my "MX Conditioning 2 DVD or Stream". This 90 minute DVD or Stream is loaded with workouts, weekly sample routines and explains so many important things every motocrosser should know, and it even comes with a PDF Training, Diet and Nutrition Manual in order to make it easy to understand and remember all the moto training info it took me over 30 years to learn. Use this TT Member's code and receive 10% off: TTGSMXS58 Get motivated and learn the most effective ways to train for motos. Learn the same methods I used to train McGrath.

Gary Semics
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All the proper upper body movements over the bike begin with how you grip the bars. Hand positioning is critical. There are two main hand positions. One is for braking and the other is for accelerating. Watch this video to learn more.

Get the full skinny on all the proper Body Positions and Movements and the most common mistakes with this DVD or Stream.

Want to be notified when I post a new tip? In the upper-right of this page, click the "follow this blog" button. You'll only see it if you're logged in.

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Gary Semics
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Many riders have problems with their back from time to time. Is this normal or can a simple riding technique regarding posture keep your back healthy and strong? Watch this video to find out.

This Strong Back Technique is only the tip of the ice berg. Click here in order to understand all the proper Body Positions and Movements of Motocross.

To be notified when I post Blogs click the "follow this blog" link in the upper right corner.

Gary Semics
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Do you need to use the clutch when up shifting? How do you up shift when you're in the forward body position? Checkout this video tip on proper shifting in Motocross and more facts about Clutch, Throttle and Shifting Techniques. These 3 things of Clutch, Throttle and Shifting have to work together in order to keep the engine happy and of course improve your lap times.

Motocross Clutch, Throttle and Shifting Techniques DVD or Stream.

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Want to be notified when I post new tips? Click the "Follow This Blog" button in the upper right. Thanks much!

Ride hard, ride smart.

Gary Semics

Professional Motocross Trainer

Gary Semics
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There's a lot more then just slowing down for the beginning of a berm (rutted) corner. You have to continue to control your speed all the way through the berm. Once your front wheel checks into the berm it's all done with the front brake and throttle. This YT video will give you a little better understanding.

If you really want to improve your motocross skills through the berms get my VO3 DVD #5 (Motocross Berm Corner Techniques DVD or Stream). You'll be surprised how much easier and faster your bermed corners will be when you know all the secrets of how to practice them. TT members get an additional 10% off my DVDs or Streams with this code: TTGSMXS58.

If you like my Blog tips be sure to follow this blog. How do you do this? In the upper right-hand corner, click the "Follow this Blog" button.

Gary Semics

Professional MX Trainer

Gary Semics
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Hi TT Members,

I'm happy Bryan Bosch, ThumperTalk's Publisher created this blogging system for us. It will help me help you members improve your motocross riding skills. In order to follow my Blog and be sent a notice when I post a new entry, click the "Follow this Blog" button in the upper corner of the page.

Ride hard, ride smart,

Gary Semics

Gary Semics
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Learn how the feet and ankles are suppose to work in Cycling and Motocross. What is the relationship and what are the correct techniques on the pedals and footpegs? Give the video a watch and see what you think:

Motocross Body Positions and Movements DVD or Stream.

The Motocross Practice Manual:

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If you're serious about improving your motocross riding skills, be sure to follow this blog. How do you do this? In the upper right-hand corner, click the "Follow this Blog" button.

Gary Semics

Professional MX Trainer

Gary Semics
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This video was taken at a training session that was held at Club MX Training Facility in Chesterfield S. Carolina. For this video lesson, I use slow motion, freeze frames and repeat frames while narrating the video, pointing out various riding techniques, conditions and even some mistakes, all relating to motocross jumping skills. Give it a watch and see if it confirms what you already know, gives you a different perspective or demonstrates techniques that you really need to work on.

Thanks for watching!

Gary Semics

Professional Motocross Trainer and Technique DVD production.

If you're serious about improving your motocross skills, checkout my website for additional tips and training resources. TT Members receive an additional 10% discount off all items in my store with this code: TTGSMXS58. Also, be sure to follow my Blog on ThumperTalk! In the upper-right of your screen, click the "Follow this blog" button.

Gary Semics
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Your ability to stop or slow down is your right away to speed. Good braking techniques are overlooked by all C riders and many B riders. But, braking control is just as important as clutch and throttle control. Both front and rear brakes are equally important, but for this riding tip, I'm just going to cover the rear brake.

When the throttle is off, the rear brake should be on. In some situations, this is not as necessary on 4 stroke 250Fs because of their engine braking effects while in higher RPM ranges. This rear brake technique does apply more to 450Fs because they are not usually run in the higher RPM ranges while off the throttle and therefore, don't have as much engine braking. Of course, 2 strokes don't have as much engine braking either. Therefore, this 3 step rear braking technique is crucial.

Here's the way this 3 step braking technique works; while standing and riding down a straight away into a corner, when the throttle goes off, the rear brake goes on while the rider's body position us in the back position, the rear brake must continue to be controlled while the rider goes from standing to sitting. This is usually about a quarter way into the corner. Now the rider is controlling the rear brake while sitting on the front part of the seat, continuing to control the rear brake until he/she gets on the clutch and throttle to exit the corner. Only at that time is the rear brake released.

Check out this video to see how it works:

Learn how all of the 55 Absolute Techniques of Motocross work and how you can make them become part of your natural riding style with my VO3 Technique DVDs or Streams Series. http://www.gsmxs.com...value-pack-2011

Follow my Blog and be notified when I post new Blog entries. Click the button in the upper right corner "Follow this Blog".

Gary Semics

Professional Motocross Trainer

If you're serious about improving your motocross skills, checkout my website for additional tips and training resources.

Gary Semics
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Clearing a jump right out of a corner can be difficult for beginners. The Seat Bouncing Techniques are usually the best techniques to use in these situations. You can find the seat bouncing techniques in the Free Riding Tips page of my website and also in my Volume 3 DVD #7 (Seat Bouncing and Launching Techniques)

In order to get the most out of the seat bouncing techniques, you need to be really good at using the clutch and throttle to deliver a lot of power to the rear wheel at the precise time. To do this correctly, you need to use one or two fingers on the clutch. I prefer one finger because it allows you to hold onto the grip better with the other three fingers. This way you can get on the power hard with the clutch and throttle. You do not slip the clutch like you do when you do a start, but instead, you use the clutch more like a trigger, hitting the trigger (clutch) at the precise time you need to increase the power to the rear wheel. In this situation, it would be when the rear wheel compresses into the jump. This increased power will multiply the seat bouncing technique, giving you more height and distance.

Most beginner riders do not use the clutch in this way, but instead, depend on just the throttle alone. Even on a four stroke, you need to learn to use that clutch and throttle together in order to control the power to the rear wheel more precisely.

For all the details of these techniques and more, go to the Volume 3 DVDs numbers 3 (Clutch, Throttle and Shifting Techniques) and

7 (Seat Bouncing and Launching Techniques).

I hope that this helps you.

Gary Semics

Professional Motocross Trainer

If you're serious about improving your motocross skills, checkout my website for additional tips and training resources.

Be notified when I post new blog entries by clicking the "follow this blog" button in the upper right corner.

Gary Semics

The 2014 SX Series is about to start. Here's some video from Club MX's SX track. See what some pro riders have been doing to prepare and get some important techniques for how they are skimming whoops.

Gary Semics

Professional Motocross Trainer

If you're serious about improving your motocross skills, checkout my website for additional tips and training resources.