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About this blog

Coach Robb is a human performance expert that helps amatuer and pro-level riders perform their best, focusing on diet, fitness, and mental conditioning.

Entries in this blog

 

Coach Robb's Quick Tips: Should you supplement to ride your best?

I received a phone call from a rider who wanted to know if taking vitamins was going to help him recover from Epstein Barr.   The answer is maybe.   The key to any level of health, wellness and ultimately performance is consistent intake of fresh fruits, vegetables and lean protein. Nutrition is literally that simple. Supplementation is designed to "supplement" your raw food intake - if you are not getting enough, supplement with some extra.   I only recommend that supplementation become part of a riders program when the rider is burning up more of a certain trace mineral or vitamin during riding, racing and cross training. The way I determine if a rider needs additional supplementation is to have a full blood panel drawn and evaluated. Please note, when you receive your blood panel back, the ranges that are denoted as "good" are only a range that represents the absence of disease. Your numbers need to be based on true health and performance! If you don't have a qualified person available to read your blood results, please forward me a copy and I will have it reviewed by a qualified physician who understands the demands of riding and racing.   Please email me if you have any questions or need anything clarified.
-Coach Robb     If you would like to follow my blog, please click the "Follow this Blog" button in the upper right.

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

Eliminate Arm Pump – Part 4 (Why Improving Your Endurance will Help Eliminate Arm Pump!

Why Improving your Endurance will Help Eliminate Arm Pump   This week we will look at how improving your cardiovascular (aka Cardio) engine will reduce your overall fatigue and help you maintain the proper body position and keep the load off of your forearms.
If you watched my Arm Pump video ( if you haven't seen it yet), you understand that my experience with arm pump is associated with bad body position. Specifically, if your center point (i.e. belly button) falls behind the pegs, the only muscles left to hand onto the bike is your forearm muscles.   As a human performance coach for the last 29 years, I have seen riders experience the dreaded arm pump symptoms because they are not properly prepared for the demands of a specific race. By understanding, training and improving your 5 energy systems will result in faster times on the track. First let’s break down the five Energy Systems and how often to train them for optimum performance.  
Pictured: Ryan Dungey   Explosive Speed
What it is: the effort level used during maximum efforts
When used on the track: to pick up the bike after a crash and sprint back up to speed
How to improve: complete 8-10 sets of 15 to 30 second all out sprint efforts
How often to train: no more than 2x a week allowing for 2 days of recovery   Sprint Speed
What it is: the effort level used for durations lasting 1-2 minutes
When used on the track: opening lap of a race
How to improve: 4-6 sets of 90 seconds to 2 minute interval
How often to train: no more than 2x a week allowing for 2 days of recovery   Anaerobic Threshold
What it is: the effort allows the racer to perform at a higher level of output and for the entire duration of the race without becoming anaerobic (and slowing down!)
When used on the track: between first & last lap
How to improve: 10-20 sets of 2-3 minute intervals
How often to train: 2-3x a week allowing for 1 day of recovery   Aerobic Training
What it is: the effort level needed for races lasting longer than 15 minutes in duration
When used on the track: maintaining consistent lap times as the race goes longer than 15 minutes
How to improve: 2-6 sets of 10 minutes to 1 hour
How often to train: 5-6x a week; no recovery needed because of the minimal fatigue placed upon the muscular system   What is your physical limiter on the track?
Ironically, this is one question that many riders can’t answer as it relates to their performance on the track. Think about the question, where do you fall apart during a race? Do you lack opening speed? Are you unable to maintain a consistent pace for the duration of the race? Is your last lap your fastest lap at every race? The answer to these questions should dictate your training efforts on a daily basis–where you fall apart on the track is EXACTLY what you should be training during the week to eliminate any weaknesses on the track. At MotoE our focus is to identify & train your weaknesses during the week and race your strengths on the weekend. Eventually, you will have no weaknesses; once this achieved long term domination becomes a reality.   In addition to the MotoE Strength & Plyometric Assessment (please email me if you would like a copy of this assessment), you need to complete cardiovascular assessments to determine where to focus during your training both on the track and in the gym for maximum results in the shortest period of time. For a copy of MotoE’s Baseline Aerobic Assessment Protocols, please email me directly and I will send you a seven day training schedule that incorporates these assessments along with a spreadsheet that you can upload your results for future comparison.   The key to your improvement on the track is that your intensity during training (both on and off of the track) needs to be specific to the energy systems that have been validated as needing improvement. If you train at the wrong intensity, you will not eliminate your weakness on the track and your current breaking point on the track will continue to exist.   Race to Evaluate your Progress
A few races, planned two to four weeks out from your key race will help you identify if your training efforts are on point. For example, if your early race speed needed to be improved – how did you do when the race began? Where you able to sustain the high intensity levels necessary to be competitive? Was your warm up sufficient to allow you to get up to top speed early or did you use the first part of the race to make this happen? If there is a skill that needs to be developed for your key race, how is that skill developing? If you miss your mark, you have clear focus on what to work on over the remaining two to four weeks before your key event. I hope you see how this becomes an endless circle that guarantees your success!   Establish Training Volumes and Intensity Levels
Knowing your overall training volume (sport specific and cross training) is key to understanding if your body is getting the correct mixture of speed, endurance, strength, flexibility and mental development (all of which need to be outlined on your weekly schedule). I say this often, but feel it is worth repeating, “it isn’t what you do in the form of training, but rather, what you absorb”. If you are not seeing your performance elements improving, then guess what, you are not getting any better – think about this!   Additionally, most athletes are not training at the intensity levels that they think they are. It has been my experience that most athletes train too hard on their easy days and not hard enough on their high quality days. This creates a two-fold problem. They train too hard on easy days which leaves them too fatigued to push the intensity levels to the next level for improved fitness and top end speed. With this in mind, I have all of my clients train with a heart rate monitor to ensure that this scenario doesn’t happen. I have each client complete a maximum heart rate assessment every 6 to 8 weeks to ensure that we are using accurate numbers to maximize their training efforts. Note: please refrain from using the 220 – your age formula; I have seen this formula be off by more than 50%!   Properly Evaluate Key Workouts
As mentioned above, I have my athletes train with a heart rate monitor for every workout to eliminate any misperceptions of true intensity levels. I have some people argue that a heart rate monitor doesn’t factor in variables such as heat and humidity, but I would have to strongly disagree. If the body is struggling with these variables, it will be clearing indicated in the heart rate monitor. The athlete can adjust the intensity and the interval distance if the heart rate monitor is indicating that the overall stress on the body may be too much and counterproductive.   With the utilization of a heart rate monitor and the implementation of key workouts over a specific training cycle (based on your key race dates), you are able to specifically evaluate the progress of your endurance and top end speed. All of my clients are provided performance report cards so that they can specifically see the progress and adaptations that their body is going through during their training cycles of 6 to 12 weeks depending on their race schedule. With the feedback of these key workouts, we can structure the next weeks training protocols accordingly to ensure that the athlete’s efforts are laser focused – providing the athlete the results that he or she has outlined in their goal profile.   In Part 5, I will provide you specific workouts for each energy system that you have identified are holding you back while on the bike. In Part 6, I will show you (and provide you) how a week of cross training and riding should be combined to develop the necessary strength, endurance and flexibility to eliminate any physical limiters on the bike. Until next time, Train Smart, Not Hard!   Yours in sport and health,
-Coach Robb, Coaches and Staff     If you would like to follow my blog, please click the "Follow this Blog" button in the upper right.

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

Eliminate Arm Pump – Part 3 (Establish Optimum Range of Motion & Strength: Shoulders, Chest and Neck

Here is part three of a six part series of videos to help you eliminate arm pump during riding and racing. If you watched my Arm Pump video ( if you haven't seen it yet), you understand that my experience with arm pump is associated with bad body position. Specifically, if your center point (i.e. belly button) falls behind the pegs, the only muscles left to hand onto the bike is your forearm muscles. To keep this from happening, you need to grip and move the bike with every muscle possible to keep the load levels off of your forearms. This week we will look at the Shoulders, Chest and Neck to help improve your strength and endurance on the motorcycle to maintain the proper body position and keep the load off of your arms and onto bigger and stronger muscles. Pre-Exercise Foam Rolling As mentioned in Part 1, please and implement 5-10 minutes of these lower body foam roller exercises PRIOR to warming up with some low intensity cardio for 10 minutes (Concept 2 rower, Bicycle, Treadmill, Elliptical, etc.). Shoulders, Chest and Neck Specific Strength Exercises for a complete list of Shoulders, Chest and Neck specific exercises to choose from. Choose four (4) exercises per body part: Shoulders, Chest and Neck Complete 2 to 3 sets and 10-15 Repetitions with 30 seconds of rest in between each exercise. Cardio Challenge Complete 3 x 30 seconds of a Military Spiders ( for an instructional Video). Post Exercise Flexibility and spend 10 minutes completing two to four exercises specific to your Shoulders, Chest and Neck to improve your flexibility. Strive to implement this series of exercises three times a week. If you would like to review how we implement strength training with riding and other cross training exercises, please Click Here to reach our Customer Service department and request "Sample Training Overview". The next article will discuss and breakdown how proper cardio training can improve your body position on the bike keeping your heart rate low and resulting in better endurance and the elimination of arm pump. Until next time, Train Smart, Not Hard! Yours in sport and health, -Coach Robb If you would like to follow my blog, please click the "Follow this Blog" button in the upper right.

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

Eliminate Arm Pump - Part 2 (Establish Optimum Range of Motion & Strength): Glutes, Lower Back & Core)

Here is part two of a six part series of videos to help you eliminate arm pump during riding and racing. If you watched my Arm Pump video ( if you haven't seen it yet), you understand that my experience with arm pump is associated with bad body position. Specifically, if your center point (i.e. belly button) falls behind the pegs, the only muscles left to hand onto the bike is your forearm muscles. To keep this from happening, you need to grip and move the bike around with your legs, glutes (butt muscles), core muscles and lower back verses your arms (specifically your forearms). This week we will look at the glutes (your butt muscles), lower back and core (abdominal muscles) to help improve your strength and endurance on the motorcycle to maintain the proper body position and keep the load off of your arms and onto bigger and stronger muscles. Pre-Exercise Foam Rolling As mentioned in Part 1, please and implement 5-10 minutes of these lower body foam roller exercises PRIOR to warming up with some low intensity cardio for 10 minutes (Concept 2 rower, Bicycle, Treadmill, Elliptical, etc.). Note: you can use a foam roller, tennis ball, lacrosse ball, etc. Glutes, Lower Back and Core Specific Strength Exercises for a complete list of Glutes, Lower Back and Core specific exercises to choose from. Choose four (4) exercises per body part: Glutes, Lower Back and Core Complete 2 to 3 sets and 10-15 Repetitions with 30 seconds of rest in between each exercise. Cardio Challenge Complete 3 x 30 seconds of a Jump Rope ( for an instructional Video). and learn how the Jump Rope exercise is relative to riding a motorcycle. Post Exercise Flexibility and spend 10 minutes completing two to four exercises specific to your glutes, lower back and core to improve your flexibility. Strive to implement this series of exercises three times a week. If you would like to review how we implement strength training with riding and other cross training exercises, please Click Here to reach our Customer Service department and request "Sample Training Overview". Next week we will discuss and break down your Shoulders, Chest and Neck and how they relate to proper body position on the bike. Until next time, Train Smart, Not Hard! Yours in sport and health, -Coach Robb If you would like to follow my blog, please click the "Follow this Blog" button in the upper right.

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

Eliminate Arm Pump - Part 1 (Establish Optimum Range of Motion & Strength): Quads, Hamstrings, Calves

A few weeks back, I published a video about Arm Pump and received a tremendous amount of emails questions along with some comments posted here on TT. As promised, I have put together a six part series of videos to help you eliminate arm pump during riding and racing. If you watched my Arm Pump video ( if you haven't seen it yet), you understand that my experience with arm pump is associated with bad body position. Specifically, if your center point (i.e. belly button) falls behind the pegs, the only muscles left to hand onto the bike is your forearm muscles. To keep this from happening, you need to grip and move the bike around with your legs, glutes (butt muscles), core muscles and lower back verses your arms (specifically your forearms). This week we will look at the lower body muscles (front and back): Pre-Exercise Foam Rolling With this in mind, please and implement 5-10 minutes of these lower body foam roller exercises PRIOR to warming up with some low intensity cardio for 10 minutes (Concept 2 rower, Bicycle, Treadmill, Elliptical, etc.). Note: you can use a foam roller, tennis ball, lacrosse ball, etc. Leg Specific Strength Exercises and choose four (4) of the leg exercises. 2 to 3 sets - 10-15 Repetitions - 30 second rest Two to the front and two to the back of your legs. This will create muscular balance and help eliminate knee pain. Cardio Challenge - Lower Leg specific Complete 3 x 30 seconds of a Star ( for an instructional Video). and learn how the Star exercise is relative to riding a motorcycle. Post Exercise - Single Leg Stretches and spend 10 minutes completing these seven single leg exercises to improve your flexibility. Strive to implement this series of exercises three times a week. If you would like to review how we implement strength training with riding and other cross training exercises, please click here to reach our Customer Service department and request "Sample Training Overview". Next week we will discuss and break down your core and lower back. Until next time, Train Smart, Not Hard! Yours in sport and health, -Coach Robb If you would like to follow my blog, please click the "Follow this Blog" button in the upper right.

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

Determine Your Sweat Rate for Optimum Health & Performance

First and foremost, I want to apologize to everyone for my delay on posting back on TT. I have been out of pocket for the last couple of weeks, but we are back and working on the strength and flexibility video series specific to arm pump and body position. In the meantime, I wanted to address something that is a significant component of cramping in general: hydration levels. Watch this short video and let me know if you would like a copy of my Sweat Rate Calculator. It is easy to use and provides you immediate feedback regarding your body's sweat mechanism as it relates to intensity, duration, heat and humidity. As always, if you have any questions or need anything clarified, please post your comments below. Thank you for visiting TT and watching the video. Yours in sport and health, -Coach Robb If you would like to follow my blog, please click the "Follow this Blog" button in the upper right.

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

Arm Pump: Fact or Fiction? (video)

If you struggle with the dreaded arm pump symptoms while riding or racing, please watch this video to understand what is going on. You may be surprised about what is the source of this dreaded pain! Next week I will show you how you can easily reduce these symptoms, so be sure to click the "follow this blog" button in the upper-right. If you have any questions, feel free to submit them in comments section below. I'll do my best to respond to your questions and concerns. Yours in sport and health, -Coach Robb If you would like to follow my blog, please click the "Follow this Blog" button in the upper right.

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

Don't Stretch Prior to Exercise

I posted another video that I did back during the summer about this subject and it created quite a disturbance with a few of you! Please watch this slightly more detailed video about the importance of a warm up prior to exercise. I am confused why some think that this concept is BS? When you think about how the body protects itself (keeping the majority of the blood in around the heart and spine while resting) why does sport specific exercise at a low intensity prior to a workout so far fetched? If you try to bend anything that is cold, it is more prone to snapping - think about this. To test the stretch reflex that I am discussing put your right leg up on a chair and lock your knee out and bend over and try to touch your toes. When you feel that "strain" behind your knee you will understand the stretch reflex. When you add sport specific movement, the muscle tissue warms up (because of friction), the blood vessels open up and the muscle's is more receptive to stretching and increasing it's range of motion. When you watch professional athletes stretch, they don't stretch until they have implemented some sport specific and/or dynamic movements first. Please post any thoughts - concerns or questions that you may have regarding this topic. I picked up injured athletes from other coaches who "stretched prior to exercise" and actually tore the tissue they were striving to lengthen - and I don't want this to happen to you! I have been doing this type of work for 29 years and have never had someone become injured from stretching when they preceded stretching with sport specific exercise, dynamic movements and foam rolling. Yours in sport and health, -Coach Robb If you would like to follow my blog, please click the "Follow this Blog" button in the upper right.

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

Avoid Over-Eating & Drinking on Christmas Day!

The ONLY way to satisfy appetite is to consume high quality fat and protein. Look it up, research it, Google it, what ever you need to do to validate this physiological fact. When you don't provide your body the necessary amount of fat and protein, you will constantly be hungry. Being in a mode of hunger causes you to act spontaneously to any food that is around you. If you are on the road, when your blood sugar levels are low and you are hungry, this is what causes you to head through the drive through window for lunch or dinner. If you had some high quality fat and protein in a cooler next to you in your truck or car, you would be able to avoid the dreaded drive through window. When you are home enjoying time with your friends, family, in-laws, outlaws, etc. snack on fats and protein before you indulge in the sweet goods and alcohol. If you have followed my articles or heard me on DMXS radio, you know that I believe life is too short to not enjoy holiday cookies and home made favorites. Prior to consuming an adult beverage, sweet goods or white starchy food items (potatoes, bread, etc.), consume some lean protein like beef, chicken, ham and/or raw nuts (avoid peanuts-they are actually high in starch-sugar). Good sources of clean fat are hard cheeses (avoid American cheese), sugar free dressings and extra virgin olive oil. When you put high quality fat and protein in your gut prior to sugary, starchy food and drinks, you literally decrease the concentration of simple sugar in your gut - think about it as a "mixture". The more you can dilute the sugar with protein and fat, the smaller your blood sugar swings will be. You will also notice that you are not hungry for four to five hours after eating protein and fat, because it is so satisfying to your body. Finally, snack/eat every two hours whether you are hungry or not, this will keep you from over eating because you have allowed yourself to become so hungry. Click here for some snack suggestions that I created to help you determine what to snack on during the day. On behalf of myself, my family and staff - Merry Christmas! -Coach Robb If you would like to follow my blog, please click the "Follow this Blog" button in the upper right.

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

How to Avoid Tearing a Muscle in the Cold Weather

My phone and email inbox has been exploding with questions about pulled muscles all of a sudden. This is a pattern that I have seen for many years - when the weather becomes cold, muscles tighten more than usual bringing to the surface a tight group of muscles (it is rarely just one muscle) which becomes strained because of physical activity. To prepare the muscle for activity, it is imperative that you follow the following steps to avoid pulling or straining a muscle: Step 1 - foam roll and gently "smash" the tissue to stimulate and open up the tissue, this will cause warm blood to distribute into the muscles. for a video series specific to muscle groups. Step 2 - sport specific low intensity activity for 8-10 minutes. This distributes the blood from around your heart, spine and organs and into the working muscles. Step 3 - dynamic movements to gradually increase the range of motion of the tissue - Here's the instructional video: Step 4 - isolate and passively stretch any tissue(s) that feel tight. for a video series specific muscles. Note: if you have "knot" within the belly of the tissue, you have what is called a trigger point that needs to be interrupted. for a video series for each body part to walk you through any trigger points you may find. Step 5 - ease into your workout slowly and then gradually increase your effort to the indicated intensity levels (using your heart rate monitor) for your specific workout. These five steps will help keep you from straining a muscle as well as provide a more productive workout. If you have any questions or need anything clarified, please post below and I will answer your questions within 24 hours. - Coach Robb If you'd like to follow my blog, click the "follow this blog" button in the upper right.

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

Avoid Injuries, Speed Ruts and Burn Out Through Periodization

Many riders and racers will reach out to me around the month of April and describe symptoms that inevitably hinder a riders speed and endurance: injuries, a plateau of speed and/or the lack of desire to ride, race and cross train. At both the amateur and professional levels, the racing season has increased to the point where the racer is competing nearly year round and actually inhibiting his or her ability to improve physically as a racer. It is unrealistic to think that a racer can be in top form every weekend from January through December. Throughout the year, the body has to be provided the opportunity to develop various energy systems through specific workouts. For long term improvement, a window of time must be provided to rest and recover from the stress loads applied to the muscles and cardiovascular system. This is where Periodization comes into a racers program. Periodizaton (breaking the year up into “seasons”) answers how hard, how long and how often a racer should train to reap the benefits of training without becoming injured, fall into a speed rut or become burned out? PERIODIZATION: WHAT IT IS AND WHY IS IT AN IMPORTANT COMPONENT OF YOUR PROGRAM? As a rider and racer, you need to look at a year as four different seasons of performance development. At MotoE, we break a year into four training “seasons”: Pre-Season, Pre-Competitive, Competitive and Off Season. Each season has a different performance objective to optimize the racers training time for maximum results. With riding & racing encompassing so many elements, it has literally become a lifestyle – sleep, eat, ride, train off the motorcycle, repeat until the next ride or race. However, this lifestyle of training, doesn’t allow you to systematically decide to begin training seriously for four weeks out and then be ready for the season’s first big ride or race. On the other hand, hitting the open road on your road bike hard the Monday after your big ride or race and riding every day until next year’s race isn’t productive either. You don’t push the body beyond its familiar performance level and you don’t allow enough time for the body to adapt to the stress loads. At MotoE we work with four seasons of training - each having a specific physiological purpose. The four seasons and the necessary physiological adaptations are: Pre-Season: developing maximum aerobic capacity, muscular strength and flexibility; this is also an ideal time to work with your riding coach to help with technique and mechanics. Pre-Competitive: continued development of your aerobic engine, final stage of maximum strength development and the implementation of slight lactate tolerance intervals. Competitive: specialization is the main component of this season. Your anaerobic threshold and sprint training should make up the high quality workouts during the week. Also during this season is the increased need for rest – ideally one complete day of rest per week to help you recover both mentally and physically. Off Season: this is ideally four to six weeks in duration where you deviate away from heavily structured training. This is where you’re back to riding verses training when you are on your motorcycle or any other type of cross training. You don’t want to become so inactive that you begin to lose the conditioning you have worked so hard to achieve throughout the year; you do, however, what to remain active and healthy. PERIODIZATION: STEP ONE: ESTABLISHING GOALS This step involves establishing long term goals and developing a plan for achieving each goal. This step needs to be quantified, simple, optimistic and also realistic. Though this sounds like an easy task, it is going to take some real brain storming to narrow this first step down and onto paper. Here is an example of an unrealistic long term goal: “I want to be fast”. There is no way to quantify fast and there is no time line established to complete it. It also doesn’t tell you who you are setting your standards against. If you say: “I want to be the top local rider in my class by the next national” – this is quantified, specific and with a little research you are able to determine what it is going to take to surpass the current top riders to achieve the status you are looking for. At MotoE we have our clients establish three sets of goals – 3 months, 6 months and 12 months. If you would like a copy of this MotoE Goal Profile, please email me for your personal copy. If you have established goals in past seasons and you have had trouble obtaining your goals, feel free to forward your MotoE Goal Profile to me and I will be happy to review and help you develop some training objectives to help you achieve your personal goals for the season. The most important thing to remember when you are sitting down to establish your goals is that they need to be specific and each should have a date applied. Without specific goals, you will quickly lose your motivation to stick to the homework, especially when it becomes difficult (due to either the duration or intensity levels required). PERIODIZATION: STEP TWO: DETERMINING A STARTING POINT WITH YOUR TRAINING If you are starting at a minimum fitness level, you will have to increase your overall strength and endurance before your dive into a comprehensive performance program. As a general rule of thumb, don’t increase your duration of your overall workouts by more than 5-8% every other week. Once you have been consistent with some level of training for six to eight weeks without any physical setbacks, it is time to determine exactly where your fitness levels are – this will identify your strengths and weaknesses and what to address with daily training to maximize your training time. The main concept to keep in mind when it comes to training is to strengthen weaknesses which have been specifically identified through field testing. Riders and racers, like any athletes, have a tendency to complete workouts focusing only on the elements where strength already exists. For example, in the gym, you rarely see riders and racers working their legs due to the high levels of lactic acid and associated increased heart rate levels. Instead they avoid these uncomfortable exercises and complete lower intensity exercises which do not address their physical limiters. If you use riding a road bicycle as a form of cross training, and you are not a strong climber, how often do you go out and complete hill repeats to increase your strength and lactate tolerance? It is not that you are soft as an athlete; it is simply human nature to do the activities where we feel strong and confident. With this in mind, it is imperative for riders and racers to capture three key testing data points in field testing (no matter what time of year the testing is completed): aerobic capacity, muscular strength and lactate tolerance. There are numerous debates about which form of training (off of the motorcycle) are the most effective measures of your aerobic capacity, muscular strength and lactate tolerance. At MotoE, we are more interested in testing these three variables within the training modalities that you have been using over the last six to twelve months. The important thing to keep in mind with establishing base line assessment numbers is to be consistent with your testing protocols. For example, if you use the road bike for your cardio training, it would not be a wise choice to use a running test for your lactate tolerance and aerobic capacity testing due to the different muscle groups and demands on the cardiovascular system – ultimately your testing data would be inaccurate. If you would like MotoE to provide some suggestions on how to determine your aerobic capacity, muscular strength and lactate tolerance given your current training methods, feel free to contact me directly (please be sure to indicate what you are currently doing in the way of training to help me determine what is most productive for you and your program). PERIODIZATION: STEP THREE: ESTABLISHING A TRAINING PROGRAM BASED ON YOUR FIELD TESTING RESULTS This is where a human performance specialist can be an asset to a riders and racers development program – identifying where the most progress can be achieved in the shortest amount of time. As an illustration, as it relates to riding the bike, a rider or racer gets a riding coach to help work on problem areas on the motorcycle. A rider or racer may be fast through the whoops, but if he or she cannot get in and out of the corners fast, the time gained in the whoops is immediately lost in the next corner. The same applies to developing the training protocols that are going to maximize the appropriate energy systems to enhance the elements of aerobic capacity, muscular strength and lactate tolerance. As mentioned earlier, at MotoE we break the year up into the four seasons of Pre-Season, Pre-Competitive, Competitive and Off Season. During each season of training there are two key elements that have to be factored into the development of a racers training program: the energy system(s) being enhanced and the order in which they are put into place within a workout. For example, implementing muscular endurance protocols prior to explosive power protocols may actually be counterproductive based on the training season (based on race goals and the physiological adaptations needed) and the field testing results – remember, we need to constantly work on your physiological weaknesses due to the fact that you are only as strong as your weakest link in your racing program. If you would like to watch three short videos about Periodization, . The presentation is geared towards the sport of triathlon, but the concepts apply to riding and racing motorcycles as well. FOLLOWING A CUSTOMIZED NUTRITION & TRAINING PROGRAM For 29 years, MotoE has been creating customized and semi-customized nutrition and training programs for riders and racers specific to their riding and racing goals and based off of identified physical and mental limiters discovered through various assessments (based on your age, goals and availability of time to train). Our programs are broken down and priced based on the services requested; prices start at $100 per month. If you are interested in more information about pricing and services, please don’t hesitate to drop me an email. Until next time, Train Smart, Not Hard! -Coach Robb If you'd like to follow my blog, click the "follow this blog" button in the upper right.

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

Improve your Speed & Endurance by Dropping Some Body Fat

One of the most frequent questions I get asked is how to improve speed and endurance on the bike and my answer is always "drop some body fat". When you carry around unwanted body fat, your muscles have to work harder to complete the same amount of work. Fat insulates your body which makes you over-heat, another energy robbing component to your riding and racing. When you decrease your body fat, you immediately improve your VO2 Max number (a sports science number that dictates your ability to utilize oxygen, the higher the number, the better). Here are four simple steps to decreasing your body fat. Four Ways to Decrease Body Fat 1. Weight training is the key to weight loss. Building a foundation of lean muscle will provide you fat burning centers found in the muscle spindle cells that is created and enhanced with loadbearing exercises like strength training. 2. Feed your gains with protein. People often skip protein intake immediately after they exercise, thinking that they will save 200 to 300 calories. However, a high-quality shot of protein – specifically amino acids, will accelerate lean muscle growth and muscle repair post exercise. The more lean muscle you build the more efficient you are at burning body fat. 3. Determine your physical and mental limiters by completing a strength and cardiovascular assessments (sport specific). Establish specific goals and objectives for the next three, six, and 12 months that will help you eliminate your physical limiters. Research indicates that eight workouts per month is the minimum required to stick to a fitness plan. The more frequently you exercise, the better the odds are that you that your initial effort will turn into a habit. Being mentally focused will help you maintain your motivation levels. 4. If you have been away from training (i.e. off season, illness or injury), ease back into strength training and cardiovascular fitness slowly. Many people try to resume or pick up where they left off when they exercised in the past. This only results in excessively sore muscles, stressed joints, and a negative mental outlook on working out. When you begin your strength exercises, choose a load level that's extremely easy to lift for 8 to 10 reps for two sets. Complete that same amount of weight and reps for three weeks to allow your body adequate time to adjust and adapt (I refer to this as the Anatomical Adaptation Stage). For your cardiovascular exercise, keep your duration less than 30 minutes and keep your intensity low – you should be able to pass the talk test, which is where you could talk to someone else or sing to yourself while exercising without becoming winded. If you have any questions or need anything clarified, please don't hesitate to post a comment below. Until next time, Train Smart, Not Hard! -Coach Robb If you'd like to follow my blog, click the "follow this blog" button in the upper right.

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

The Ultimate Fat Burning, Muscle Building Meal During the Winter

Over the last couple of weeks I have been inundated with emails about some new ideas on what to eat now that the temperatures are dropping and it is getting darker earlier. In my opinion, this is a great time to start making and consuming homemade soup on a regular basis. Building the Perfect Soup When made with the optimum ingredients, soup can provide carbohydrates, protein, fat, vitamins, minerals and powerful antioxidants to improve your health, wellness and ultimately your performance. The good news is you can make nutritionally dense soup with whatever is in your kitchen and have it ready to consume within 30 minutes. Create your own power soup by following these five steps, choosing among the fresh, frozen, and leftover ingredients you have on hand from the list below: Step 1: Aromatics Optimum Choices: onion, garlic, celery, carrots, dried sage, thyme, oregano, bay leaves, rosemary, cumin, cinnamon, chili powder Health Benefits: they add anti-inflammatory compounds that fight soreness. Step 2: Liquids Optimum Choices: vegetables, chicken, beef and fish stock; tomato puree and juice Health Benefits: liquids keep you hydrated in the winter and relieve congestion Step 3: Vegetables Optimum Choices: kale, carrots, peppers, bok choy, cabbage, tomatoes, mushrooms, squash, broccoli, sweet potatoes Health Benefits: vegetables are loaded in antioxidant vitamins and minerals Step 4: Proteins Optimum Choices: beans (any kind), chicken, beef, fish, shrimp, tofu, edamame, lentils Health Benefits: lean protein repairs muscles and provides iron – an imperative mineral needed to carry hemoglobin (a carrier for oxygen in the blood) Step 5: Carbohydrates Optimum Choices: cooked whole grains (brown, black or wild rice, faro, quinoa and barley; whole-wheat pasta; potatoes Health Benefits: carbohydrates replenish depleted stored sugar levels within your liver (to feed the brain) and the muscles (fuel movement), provide B vitamins which are imperative for the production of energy Learning how to feed your nutritional needs for building muscle, burning fat and improving endurance, another tool for Working Smart, Not Hard! -Coach Robb If you'd like to follow my blog, click the "follow this blog" button in the upper right.

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

How to Determine If You have True Sciatica or Just A Pain In The Butt

Determine the Difference Between True Sciatica or Piriformis Syndrome If you suffer from radiating pain through your hip and down your leg, you need to determine if you have true sciatica or if you have tight muscles in your gluts (butt muscles) and hip muscles (specifically the muscles that rotate the upper leg outward). Watch this video to determine if you need to see a doctor or work on your flexibility: Periformis Syndrome Stretch When you are in the proper attack position as described by Gary, you are engaging the muscles of your butt, hips and lower back (along with a bunch of other muscles). Like any other muscle, the more you use the muscles, the tighter they naturally become. You can alleviate tight muscles by warming the tissue up, applying exercises and then . Click on each hyperlink for a bundle of videos to help you reduce the tension within the various muscles. To stretch the Piriformis muscle - the one that is causing your radiating pain down your leg, please watch this video: Note: please stretch after you have warmed up the tissue, NOT prior. and watch this video and learn why. If you have any questions or would like anything clarified, please don't hesitate to post a comment below or start a new thread here on Thumper Talk! Thanks for watching and reading. -Coach Robb If you'd like to follow my blog, click the "follow this blog" button in the upper right.

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

Low Back Pain: Strength or Flexibility?

When you are riding or racing and your lower back begins to fatigue and ultimately become sore, your position on the bike naturally adjusts to accommodate the pain (actually trying to alleviate the pain) but results in bad body position as outlined by Gary Semics. The big question that arises when this happens is should the rider become stronger or work on flexibility? The answer is YES to both. Over the last 29 years, I have seen lack of flexibility be the cause of both bad body position on the bike and consistent back pain. Here is the reason why. Imagine you and another person are pulling on a rope, unless one of you take a step closer to one another, you are not going to release the tension within the rope. If you both keep pulling on the rope, one (or both) of you will keep making adjustments in your stance to keep from falling over, this is EXACTLY what happens within the muscles. This week, lets break down Flexibility When it comes to increasing your flexibility in your back, refrain from stretching your back! Sounds odd, but let's take a look at the way the muscles attach to the bones. Quadriceps (muscle in the front of your legs) When you quadriceps (the muscles in the front of your legs) are tight, they "pull" on the top of your hip bones which tilts your pelvis forward. When this happens, your lower back now has a "bend" in it which puts a tremendous amount of stress within the muscles that run along your spine (the erector spinae muscles). Glutes (butt muscles) Your glutes (butt muscles) are a very strong group of muscles (glutes maximus and minimus) that serve numerous stabilization purposes. Hamstrings (back of your legs below your butt) The hamstrings work in conjunction with the quadriceps to stabilize the knee. However, just like the quads, when the hamstrings become tight, they pull down on the pelvis but tilt the pelvis backwards. When the hamstrings pull down, they over lengthen the quads and create muscle tightness in the lower back again. Please don't let this become confusing, picture the pelvis tilting forwards and backwards. If the muscles on either the front or the back of the pelvis become tight, the joints around the muscle group become fatigued and eventually sore. So with this being said, let's begin getting the muscles in your legs and glutes loosened up before we introduce any strength exercises. After a 10 minute warm up, and implement stretches #1-7 single muscle stretches. If you have a foam roller, please and implement the first six foam roller exercises. Next week we will look at some strength exercises that you can implement to improve your strength and endurance for riding and racing. -Coach Robb If you'd like to follow my blog, click the "follow this blog" button in the upper right.

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

Proper Recovery Elements

Proper Recovery Elements When you are working on improving your riding and racing, please keep in mind that it isn't all about what you do (regarding your weekly hours of training and the intensity that you train and ride at), but rather what you absorb. When your body absorbs, it gets progressively stronger and ultimately faster. Here are a few things to look at: Sleep: your body releases hGH (human growth hormone) when you sleep, so deep, high quality sleep is imperative to maintain a low body fat percentage. Strive to get 8 hours at night and if logistically possible, 2 hour nap during the day. Nutrition: maintain stabilized blood sugar by eating raw fruits and vegetables every 2 hours. Supplement with fish oil morning and evening and consume avocadoes and raw nuts for high quality MCT’s (medium chained triglycerides). Soft Tissue: take time after each workout to isolate and stretch single muscles to improve your range of motion. Also implement your trigger point therapy after your evening shower. Structure: when you are enjoying a rest day or a week of recovery, enjoy the absence of structure. Just go exercise verses “train”. New Activity: in addition to the absence of structure, find a new activity that you have always wanted to do: paddle boarding, surfing, hiking, climbing, etc. -Coach Robb If you'd like to follow my blog, click the "follow this blog" button in the upper right.

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

A Critical Component for Success - An Effective Warm Up

Quick Note: over the last two weeks I was discussing the importance of fats and protein (Part 1). Please click on Protein – Part 3 for the information relevant to macro nutrients. If you have any questions or need anything clarified, please email me directly. Why Warm Up? This is a question that I answer frequently both in my office and at the track. Riders are confused why they should exercise before exercising. Some are afraid that they will become tired; some feel it is a waste of time because it cuts into their ride or cross training time and others feel that they will look silly amongst their fellow riders. What most riders are aware of is that there are physiological changes that need to take place as the human body transitions from idle to very active. Re-Distribution of Blood When you are resting or at a low level of movement, the majority of your blood resides in your spine and your organs. As you begin to move progressively faster, you’re increasing your body’s demand for oxygen, so your blood vessels dilate to deliver blood to the moving muscles (specifically your arms and legs). Heat is a by-product of movement. As you begin to move faster and faster, your core body temperature rises and your body responds by “waking up” your sweat production. There tends to be a slight lag time between the initiation of movement and the production of sweat on skin (your body’s natural radiator). Allowing your body this transition window of time is imperative to optimal performance because you want your body’s natural cooling system to be at full capacity before high intensity cross training, riding or racing. Preparing the Muscles When you burn stored sugar (glycogen) from your liver and muscles, the energy production cycle releases a hydrogen ion that is acidic in nature. This acid “burns” the muscles as it begins to accumulate. Just like a motor, if you allow your body to “warm up” correctly, your body will be familiar with the presence of lactic acid and perform at a higher level of output with less effort. The Ideal Bicycle Warm-Up Routine Stage 1: 14 Minutes: Gearing: small chain ring up front, middle rear gearing Cadence: 80-85 (no higher/lower) Misc.: stretch and hydrate before moving into your main set Stage 2: 6 minutes: 1 Minute at 80-85% effort (you should not be gasping for air here!); mentally focus on 1 Minute at 60-70% effort (very relaxed; stretch as necessary) The Ideal Concept 2 Rower Warm-Up Routine Stage 1: 14 Minutes: Even tempo – smooth pulls, initiated with your legs and gluts; if you feel any muscle group(s) tighten up, by isolating both the front and back of the overly tight muscle(s). Stage 2: 6 minutes: 1 Minute strong and smooth (not a sprint); mentally focus on 1 Minute; very easy/low pull rate/active recovery After 20 minutes and top off on your glycogen reserves by consuming Energy Fuel (this will top off the glycogen levels within the muscles and the liver needed for high intensity riding. By allowing adequate time for a warm up will result in faster opening speeds, improved endurance along with improved skills on the track. If you have any questions or need anything clarified, please email me directly. Until next time, Train Smart-Not Hard! -Coach Robb If you'd like to follow my blog, click the "follow this blog" button in the upper right.

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

Exercising with "Sweat Suits" is Dangerous!

This morning while at the gym working with some clients, I saw an individual swapping between the stationary bike and the elliptical wearing a "sweat suit". These are suits that are designed to make you sweat with the selling point being more "weight loss". First of all, losing water weight is not losing weight - this is called dehydration. Dehydration is extremely hard on your body. Second of all, reducing your body's ability to remove the internal heat created by muscle movement (aka - exercise) is a short cut to experiencing a heat stroke. Heat strokes are hard on your body. Finally, internal heat within the muscle reduces the performance capabilities of the muscle. This will result in poor exercise output which will cause you to miss the purpose and goal of exercise. As you can see, "sweat suits" are bad for your performance efforts and even worse for your health. Please pass this along to anyone you know that thinks exercising in a "sweat suit" is beneficial. You just might save their life. -Coach Robb

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

Quick Guide to Protein - Part 1

Quick Guide to Protein – Part 1 This two part article is the second of a three part series about nutrition. Last week, we discussed the importance and sources of fat. This week we are going to discuss the importance and sources of protein. The Importance of Protein Because of the numerous responsibilities of protein in the body (from muscle regeneration to energy production) consuming the proper amounts on a daily basis are imperative for both health and performance. On a daily basis, your body continually makes new cells for your muscles, organs, glands and bones. All of these are built on the foundation of protein, their main building block. Keep in mind, the longer and/or harder you train the higher your protein intake on daily basis needs to be. All bodily functions, from breathing to muscle movement to new muscle development is controlled by thousands of different enzymes – and you guessed it, enzymes are made from protein as well. Even the hemoglobin, that carries the oxygen in your blood, is manufactured out of protein. The structure of your genes and your brain cells are totally fabricated from protein. As documented by Dr. Michael Colgan, research using radioisotope techniques show that over 98% of the molecules of the human body are completely replaced each year. Bits and pieces of all your structures are constantly being replaced with new proteins. Research has proven that every six months your muscles, blood, enzymes and even the structures of your genes are completely replaced. Think about this, the body that you have today is the result of what you have eaten for the last six months. Garbage in, inferior health, wellness and performance out! The Role of Protein Before we get into how much protein your need on a daily basis, let’s discuss the role of protein. In addition to growth and repair of muscles and other tissues, some protein is used for energy. Per Dr. Phil Maffetone, the amount of energy contributed by protein may be as high as 15% in some athletes. Protein is also necessary for enzymes important to metabolism. Protein is essential for maintaining neurotransmitters – the chemical messengers used by the nervous system to signal proper function throughout the body. Additionally, oxygen, fats and vitamins are transported throughout the body with the help of proteins. Protein also plays an instrumental role in making natural antibodies for your immune system. Those who lose muscle mass through reduced protein consumption have a weakened immune system. Additionally, those who consume inadequate protein may not get enough of certain nutrients necessary for proper immune function. For example, the amino acid cysteine is contained in whey protein can improve immune function. This amino acid is necessary for your body to make its most powerful antioxidant, glutathione. How much protein? The argument about how much protein is needed for optimum health & performance has become so convoluted, it has been revised by the RDA 10 times since 1943! The RDA’s current recommendation of 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight has been declared too low by many doctors and nutrition experts. Some of these professionals believe that the gram per kilogram needs to be increased by 3 – 4 times this amount to maintain proper lean muscle mass, recover from exercise and keep the blood chemistry healthy. As clearly declared by Dr. Phil Maffetone, the issue of protein needs dictated by body weight is very distorted and inaccurate. These inaccuracies are created because if you are going to use grams per kilogram of body weight, it needs to be calculated off of lean body mass (total weight minus your body fat). It is your lean muscle that needs protein, NOT your stored fat. Keep in mind that over 50% of the dry weight of your body is protein. As you can see, this can get complex and consuming quite quickly. It is for this exact reason that I don’t want you to count calories, calculate grams or weigh your food. Why? Because you can determine your personal needs by listening to your body, document your mental clarity and performance results and capture eight simple body measurements to determine how your protein, carbohydrate and fat intake is affecting your health, wellness and ultimately your performance. Dangers of Inadequate Protein Intake Signs of low protein (or low quality) intake includes: Muscle Weakness Low Energy Levels Easily Broken Bones Slow Recovery after Exercise In a study completed by Dr. Gontzea at the Institute of Medicine in Bucharest demonstrated that exercise causes increased demands on the body’s need for protein. During this study (and most studies on protein synthesis) he evaluated the nitrogen balances in urine and feces. A positive nitrogen balance means that the body is obtaining sufficient quantity and quality from the diet. A negative nitrogen balance means that the body is not receiving enough quality or quantity of protein from the diet. A negative nitrogen balance means that the body is not receiving enough quality and quantity of protein so the body literally “eats” muscle and other protein structures in the body for its daily needs. Dangers of Taking in Too Much Protein Many people are afraid of eating too much protein – and justifiably so; excessive protein intake is harsh on your body with painful side effects (i.e. kidney stones). However, if your body needs 100 grams of protein per day, then 100 grams is not too much but rather your personalized protein needs! A quick side note, many times kidney stones are a result of chronic dehydration, not excessive protein intake. If you are consuming half of your body weight in ounces of water and calculating your sweat rate during exercise, you will minimize your risk of dehydration and the development of kidney stones. Protein Intake to Build Muscle One of the big misconceptions of building muscle is that you can accomplish this task by eating tremendous amounts of meat, nuts and protein shakes. The truth about building muscle has little to do with the amount of protein you take in, but rather the demands of the body to “need” more protein to rebuild stressed muscle tissue. If you consume more protein that your body needs (and your liver processes), the excess protein is broken down into carbohydrates and passed as urea waste. The key to building more muscle mass is to stress the tendons, ligaments and muscles in a systematic manner to break down the muscle tissue without tearing it. This is a big problem with athletes who try to grow too fast, they overstress the system and instead of developing new muscle (natural anabolic growth mode) they put their bodies in a tear down mode (catabolic mode). As you incrementally add more load and stress on your tendons, ligaments and muscles, consuming high quality protein will result in increased muscle mass as the body “absorbs” the much needed amino acids which build new muscle (in addition to repairing the torn down existing muscle tissue). If you have any questions or need anything clarified, please email me directly. Until next time, Train Smart-Not Hard! -Coach Robb If you like what I'm posting and want more, click the "follow this blog" button in the upper right and you'll be notified when I post new tips.

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

Quick Guide to Good Fat Sources

Over the next three weeks, I am going to provide you a quick overview of the three macro nutrients necessary for optimum health & performance: fat, protein and carbohydrates. The reason for this three part series is to help demystify some of the confusion that is rolling around in the various media sources. Think about, on Monday fat is good, by Wednesday it is bad; Thursday protein is good for you and by Friday, protein causes kidney stones – you get my point. This confusion became crystal clear the week of Loretta Lynn’s Amateur National. During my seven days trackside in our MotoE booth, me and my team visited with over 800 riders and family members to discuss everything from how to develop more speed, improve endurance, how to handle an injury, mental blocks associated with high profile racing, proper hydration and also, how to properly eat. The two biggest areas of frustration stemmed around the mental blocks and nutrition. We will address the mental aspects of performance, but only after we clarify the facts associated with nutrition. FAT Overview: our bodies cannot produce essential fatty acids Omega-3 & Omega-6. These fatty acids are necessary for all cellular health (creates the cell membrane) & performance (energy transport, delivering oxygen, etc.). Sources: oils capture the essence of flavor from their source & concentrate their nutrients in away that is easy for the body to absorb and utilize. Olive Oil Benefits: helps increase good cholesterol Contains: Omega 9 Best used: for sautéing or topping steamed vegetables or pasta; as a salad dressing Flax Seed Oil Benefits: anti-inflammatory, cardiovascular support, helps regulate blood pressure Contains: Omega-2 and some Omega-6 Best used: in smoothies, salad dressings or alone. Also serves as a vegetarian alternative to fish oil Coconut Oil Benefits: fat burner, immune builder, promotes digestion & metabolic pathways, helps control sugar Contains: MCT’s (medium chain triglycerides) Best used: in smoothies; for baking, sautéing. Almond Oil Benefits: excellent anti-oxidant (off sets the negative side effects of high intensity training/racing) Contains: Vitamin E Best used: good in smoothies & desserts Walnut Oil Benefits: helps collect free-radicals created from oxidative stress (negative cellular by product of high intensity training/racing); supports brain function; antibacterial & antiviral. Contains: Phytonutrients, antioxidants, omega-3 and trace minerals such as selenium, magnesium, zinc, iron & B1, B2 and B3 Best used: in salad dressings, smoothies & desserts Sesame Seed Oil Benefits: supports vascular & respiratory systems Contains: calcium & lignans Best used: for finishing steamed vegetables Peanut Oil Benefits: can help reduce cholesterol Contains: moderate amounts of polyunsaturated fats, higher in monounsaturated fats Best used: high heat sautéing As you can see by the above, good fat plays an instrumental part in your health, wellness and ultimately performance. Add good fats into every meal and snack – the benefits are abundant and the impact on your performance cannot be overlooked. If you have any questions or need anything clarified, please email me directly. Coach Robb If you like what I post and want to follow me, click the "follow this blog" button in the upper right.

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

A Guide to Proper Hydration for Optimum Health, Wellness & Performance

Proper hydration is one of the “easiest” nutritional components to implement, yields huge performance gains but is still one of the most misunderstood and neglected component of a nutritional program. The Importance of Hydration Here are some statistics to shed some light on the incredible importance of being properly hydrated: -The average human body consists of 96 pints of water (64 pints inside the cells & 32 pints in the blood, lymphatic & digestive juices) -Brain: 75% water -Bone: 20-30% water -Body Fat: 10% water -Digestive Juices: 86% -Blood 85% -Muscle: 70% And in my opinion, the most staggering statistic is relevant to muscle strength; a muscle that is dehydrated by only 3% can lose up to 10% of its strength and 8% loss of speed! The potential for optimum levels of performance literally dries up! Core Body Temperature When your body is running low on proper water levels within any system of your body: lymphatic, digestive, circulatory, etc. your athletic performance is negatively affected. The most detrimental is the ability to avoid overheating. Exercise (or more specifically any form of movement) creates heat within the muscles; the higher the intensity the hotter your body becomes. When this happens, your body’s metabolic systems move into over drive to maintain 98.6 degrees (your core body temperature while you are at rest). As your core body temperature increases, your body moves this increased internal heat to the skin via your blood. The performance issue is associated with your bloods responsibility to deliver oxygen, nutrition to your working muscles and the transfer of metabolic waste of your working muscles. Outside of 98-100 degrees and your body will automatically sacrifice muscle contraction for regulation of core body temperature. Think about it this way, a reduction in muscle function, even immobility isn’t life threatening; however, if your core body temperature rises more than 9 degrees Fahrenheit, normal biochemistry ceases and you can die. Simple Steps to Properly Hydrate Daily Tips: -Strive to consume half of your body weight in ounces of cold filtered water (For example: 150 pound athlete divided by 2 = 75 ounces per day) -Keep a post it note of how many water bottles you consume throughout the day or put a black marker hash mark on your disposable water bottle to indicate how many times you have re-filled it -Drink cold fluids: this has been documented to absorb quicker and helps pull down your core temperature -Avoid carbonated water and sodas; they slow down the absorption of water -Consume complex carbohydrates - fruits & vegetables at every meal and snack: o In addition to vitamins and minerals, fruits and vegetables are high in water and electrolytes o To store sugar in your liver & muscles for energy, your body stores 2.7 grams of water – this is the way to pre-hydrate from the inside out During exercise: -Refrain from waiting until you become thirsty – you are already dehydrated [Note: the sensation of thirst, regulated by hypothalamus in your brain, occurs due to the lower concentration of water in the blood.] -Consume a sports drink that has a 5-7% carbohydrate ratio for optimum absorption -Consume 8-10 ounces every 15 minutes throughout exercise -Sip your fluids versus gulping to avoid the ingestion of air -Know your sweat rate: your goal is to lose no more than 2% (dehydrated) and no less than 1% (overhydrated). If you haven’t received a copy of our MotoE Sweat Rate Calculator, please email me and I will send one over to you -Test your hydration volumes, intake frequency and carbohydrate concentration in training and under the same conditions (temperature & humidity) as your race Post exercise: -Consume a carbohydrate and protein liquid drink within the first 20 minutes of finishing -Avoid juices, especially citrus juice, this will only add to your stomach acidity which will increase your chance of cramping and feeling nauseated. -Continue to sip on your sports drink to help replenish depleted electrolytes and sugar storages If you have any questions or need anything clarified, please email me directly. Until next time, Train Smart-Not Hard! -Coach Robb If you like my blog, you may follow it by clicking the "follow this blog" button in the upper right.

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

 

Coach Robb's Anatomy of Speed Series

Hello everyone, I wanted to introduce myself to the huge ThumperTalk.com rider community! I have been a human performance coach for 29 years and have ridden motocross since 1978. Over the last 15 years, I have had the pleasure of working with some of the motorcycle industries greatest riders (Ryan Dungey, Jeremy Martin, Adam Cianciarulo, Jordan Bailey, Charlie Mullins, Brock Tickle, Kyle Chisholm, Ashley Fiolek); however, with the demands of a growing family I have resigned from working with professional riders due to the extensive travel schedule. Over the years, I have enjoyed working with riders as young as 4 all the way up to 81; beginner to pro, motocross, supercross, off road, road racing. What I have discovered over these years, is that the frustrations with nutrition, hydration, sprint speed, endurance, flexibility, dealing with injuries, how to handle heat and humidity and how to handle the mental aspects associated with performance run across all ages and ability levels. Here at ThumperTalk.com, I will be moderating your questions, comments, frustrations or concerns associated with nutrition and fitness relevant to any form or riding. Within my Coach Robb blog, I will be posting a series of articles and videos outlining the true anatomy of speed. When an excellent riding coach (like Gary Semics) makes a suggestion about how to rider more effectively, I want to make sure that you have the proper strength, flexibility and endurance to implement Gary's techniques correctly and for as long as you are riding or racing. If there is a particular area that you are struggling with: cramping, dehydration, late race fatigue, inability to sprint, handling race day pressure, etc., please feel free to post here on ThumperTalk.com so that I can ensure that my blog posts are helping you improve your riding fitness. I want to thank Bryan and everyone at ThumperTalk.com for this opportunity. Yours in sport and health, -Coach Robb Please follow my blog by clicking the "Follow this blog" button in the upper right. Thanks in advance!

Coach Robb

Coach Robb

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