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Brian, any tips regarding attack angle? Sometimes you can't hit a log at 90 degrees. I know that you have to be on the gas when you're lofting the front wheel, but do you recommend pulling the clutch in at varying levels based upon the anticipated traction? For example, crossing a debarked, wet log at a decent angle.

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37 minutes ago, Bryan Bosch said:

Brian, any tips regarding attack angle? Sometimes you can't hit a log at 90 degrees. I know that you have to be on the gas when you're lofting the front wheel, but do you recommend pulling the clutch in at varying levels based upon the anticipated traction? For example, crossing a debarked, wet log at a decent angle.

First off never hit a log at a 90 degree angle. You want to front tire to hit the top or barely miss the log. This will keep the bike level and put two tires on the ground quicker. As I said in the video have finger on the clutch this way you can control wheel spin and torque.

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I didn't mean that you plow the log with your front tire, but the angle of attack as you approach the log. Often times, the log is laying across a narrow trail at a good angle, so you can't "square up" on the log to cross it. And, sometimes the log is off the ground. Wondered if you had any other tips for more advance obstacles. Sounds your technique in these cases is pretty much the same as a log laying on the ground that you can cross perpendicular.

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Yeah, those angled, slimy, barkless downed trees can be a bitch. I try to slow it down enough to have the balance/posture to clear both wheels as much as possible 'cause the more you touch the more you typewriter!

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Just now, crankee said:

Yeah, those angled, slimy, barkless downed trees can be a bitch. I try to slow it down enough to have the balance/posture to clear both wheels as much as possible 'cause the more you touch the more you typewriter!

Those are even more fun when the trail is cross hill. A few of those have bitten me over the years, mostly those that are elevated. Keeps riding interesting tho! ;)

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Just now, Bryan Bosch said:

Those are even more fun when the trail is cross hill. A few of those have bitten me over the years, mostly those that are elevated. Keeps riding interesting tho! ;)

For sure, I seem to recall picking my bike up with amazingly high percentages of attempts on these! That damn gravity, why you gotta be one of the constants in life damn it??

3 minutes ago, crankee said:

Yeah, those angled, slimy, barkless downed trees can be a bitch. I try to slow it down enough to have the balance/posture to clear both wheels as much as possible 'cause the more you touch the more you typewriter!

 

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1 hour ago, Bryan Bosch said:

Brian, any tips regarding attack angle? Sometimes you can't hit a log at 90 degrees. I know that you have to be on the gas when you're lofting the front wheel, but do you recommend pulling the clutch in at varying levels based upon the anticipated traction? For example, crossing a debarked, wet log at a decent angle.

 

23 minutes ago, Bryan Bosch said:

I didn't mean that you plow the log with your front tire, but the angle of attack as you approach the log. Often times, the log is laying across a narrow trail at a good angle, so you can't "square up" on the log to cross it. And, sometimes the log is off the ground. Wondered if you had any other tips for more advance obstacles. Sounds your technique in these cases is pretty much the same as a log laying on the ground that you can cross perpendicular.

Understood.

same as explained it all depends on situation. Tire should barely touch or miss log. If slippery off off camber log miss it with front tire and as the rear tire strikes it try to be as light as possible on the pegs so it can roll over. You want to be off the gas or minimum throttle with controlled wheel spin.

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Sometimes the "lumberjack method" is the best approach. ;) We had decent sized logs across trails after Hurricane Irma that were more than 3ft off the ground, resting on their branches. The 40+v electric units are getting pretty damn nice and less than 10lbs.

P9140011sm500.jpeg

 

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Much different method than what we teach in the MSF course where we instruct to tap the obstacle with the front wheel. Using the suspension to get over the obstacle. Too often riders try to wheelie over a log only to load up the rear suspension and get thrown off. 

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37 minutes ago, ckny said:

Much different method than what we teach in the MSF course where we instruct to tap the obstacle with the front wheel. Using the suspension to get over the obstacle. Too often riders try to wheelie over a log only to load up the rear suspension and get thrown off. 

I have stated twice above the you tap the wheel on top or if off camber you miss it barely. What you are saying dosen’t make sense. How can you tap the top of a obstacle without doing a wheelie first? Also in the video I talk about using the suspension numerous times. Lastly this is a advanced maneuver so learning body position, clutch, throttle control are important. Loading the suspension gives you loft and lightens the bike when you strike a obstacle. I learned this from experience trial and error not a classroom. Thanks for engaging!!!!

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Perhaps you should modify the video because it clearly shows the wheel going right over the obstacle. Regarding the term wheelie, I guess that depends on what you consider a wheelie. I didn’t comment to start an argument, I made a simple statement indicating that you appear to teach the lesson differently than some others out there. Trial and error is great. The course I teach is a beginner course and all of the learning is through trial and error riding a bike for 6 hours. 

Thanks for your contribution to TT and the community. 

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On 1/31/2018 at 9:10 AM, Bryan Bosch said:

Brian, any tips regarding attack angle? Sometimes you can't hit a log at 90 degrees. I know that you have to be on the gas when you're lofting the front wheel, but do you recommend pulling the clutch in at varying levels based upon the anticipated traction? For example, crossing a debarked, wet log at a decent angle.

Keep the front end light on those logs. When riding at a fast pace, sometimes they can sneak up on you and leave you with no time to prepare. In those cases, I simply put all my weight on the back wheel. If it kicks my front end over its is usually easy enough to manage. This only works on something small like 6 or 8 inches round. If its a big log, I just wreck :)

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Hitting a debarked log at a angle is always hard. The most important thing is the tires being light when crossing the log. That being said I’ll pop a little wheelie and miss the log completely with my front tire. Using my clutch to control wheel spin and rpm. Once my front end is over I am going to Shift myweight forward and get weight  off the rear end. So the tire can go over obstacles light with a little momentum or just a tiny bit of throttle if I need it. Never to much or the backend will spin out to the side.

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