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5 Simple Things That Will Improve Your Riding Sessions and Racing!

Coach Robb

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Eat Prior to Working Out

Eat soon before you head out and you could be plagued with G.I. (gastro-intestinal) issues. But if your last snack or meal was hours ago, you could run out of energy. The goal is to time your meals & snacks to provide a stabilized blood sugar level throughout your riding session or cross training work out. Accomplish this by eating every 2 hours after you wake up in the morning

Allow 2 hours after eating a complete meal before exercising – this allows for complete absorption and proper purging avoiding cramping. If you are tight on time, consume 8-10 ounces of Energy Fuel to provide your brain and muscles the easily absorbable carbohydrates and electrolytes necessary for optimum performance.

 

Foam Rolling

Use a foam roller before your pre-ride or work out stretching. The direct pressure helps vasodilate (open up) the tissue bringing fresh blood to the muscles about to be used. When you foam roll prior to stretching, you will reduce the activation of the Stretch Reflex, reducing your risk of a pulled muscle.

Chronic aches and pains like Achilles tendinitis, planter fascia, etc. benefit from direct pressure before exercise because it increases blood flow & muscle elasticity. Riding & cross training is more productive when tender/sore spots are warm. Start by rolling with a tennis ball move to a lacrosse ball then manual massage then sport specific exercise.

 

Warm Up

There are three physiological benefits to an effective warm up. First, your warm up is an activity that allows the body to transition from inactivity to activity and to distribute the blood flow into the extremities. This distribution of blood warms up the muscles, tendons, cartilage and ligaments avoiding any cramping or tearing.

 

Refuel

Immediately after a riding or cross training session, your muscles and liver are looking for simple sugar to replenish your storage levels for the next workout. Your window of opportunity is 20-30 minutes after you finish because of an enzyme (glycogen synthase) that is at its highest activity level immediately following exercise. By consuming real food that is easily digestible is the key to optimum replenishment and recovery.

 

Ice your pain

When to apply ice depends on the injury. If the pain is chronic, here's the best post workout sequence; foam roll, static stretch, ice. But for acute pain (less than 72 hours since incident), skip foam rolling & stretching and ice immediately. The quicker you ice, the faster you slow down inflammation. Do a 5 minute on-off cycle as much as possible during the first 72 hours after injury.

NOTE: Refrain from applying heat to the aggravated/injured for the first 72 hours – this will only increase the inflammation process.

 

Yours in health and sport,

-Coach Robb

(CompleteRacingSolutions.com

 

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Not sure this is valid anymore...why do you suggest this? Are there recent studies that you can point to? What I have been reading lately is that one should stay away from the foods that cause those wild swings in glucose and that if you eat right your body will simply burn the fat that we all carry. Sorry that I am arguing but I worry that young guys will simply follow the instructions to eat every two hours without understanding that everyone doesn't agree with that idea. 

 

Eat Prior to Working Out

Eat soon before you head out and you could be plagued with G.I. (gastro-intestinal) issues. But if your last snack or meal was hours ago, you could run out of energy. The goal is to time your meals & snacks to provide a stabilized blood sugar level throughout your riding session or cross training work out. Accomplish this by eating every 2 hours after you wake up in the morning

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Hey Coach, thanks for the nice advice and especially for having a manuscript. 

As for getting to quick recovery by eating, I totally agree, however any meal that is going to induce insulin production, ie, sugar and starch are not recommend. 

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The key is to leverage the Glycogen Synthase Enzyme that is most active the first 10-20 minutes post exercise.  The muscles are clamoring for sugar to replenish depleted levels.  I learned this the hard way while at the Olympic Training Center.  I didn't want to touch simple sugars post exercise until a Danish cycling coach taught me otherwise.  As soon as I introduced simple sugars (and liquid aminos) immediately after exercise, my level of recovery sky rocketed.  I have never looked back and want others to enjoy enhanced recovery as well.  

-Coach Robb 

 

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20 hours ago, Coach Robb said:

The key is to leverage the Glycogen Synthase Enzyme that is most active the first 10-20 minutes post exercise.  The muscles are clamoring for sugar to replenish depleted levels.  I learned this the hard way while at the Olympic Training Center.  I didn't want to touch simple sugars post exercise until a Danish cycling coach taught me otherwise.  As soon as I introduced simple sugars (and liquid aminos) immediately after exercise, my level of recovery sky rocketed.  I have never looked back and want others to enjoy enhanced recovery as well.  

-Coach Robb 

 

I guess if my goal was to replenish glycogen for another sprint or something of that sort, I would definitely trust your experience and expertise. As an endurance athlete and someone who's looking to optimize a hard workout for strength and muscle growth, I'd rather do protein after a hard ride and glycogen be dammed. Based on my understanding of my endocrine system gleaned reading Dr Barry Sears 'Enter the Zone', I'd rather have my system in more of a HGH, IGH1 zone, and not destroy that by doing an insulin spike. Maybe there's a way to happily split the difference?  I do know that doing a prolonged fast after intense exercise to maintain HGH doesn't really seem to improve my performance.

Thanks again Coach Robb

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