Pro Racing

Motocross, Supercross, Arenacross, Endurocross, GNCC, Hare & Hound, Hillclimb, Flattrack, and Trials, this is the place to talk about your favorite pro events and riders.

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  • Featured Content

    Rhino USA Digital & Analog Tire Pressure Gauges
    I've been using both of these Rhino USA tire pressure gauges for a couple of months and really like them a lot. Both feel like good quality tools that will last with regular use and while they do a rather simple job well, it's the attention to detail and thoughtful features that make them stand out in of sea of options for this category. Case in point, when my family chose to evacuate for hurricane Irma last fall, I ended up checking the tire pressures on my heavily loaded down Chevy Tahoe in the dark wee hours of the morning. My previous digital tire gauge lacked the illuminated tip and backlit LCD readout of the digital Rhino USA unit, so I had to take a reading and walk around to the interior dome light to read each result. Not the end of the world, but when you're trying to beat literally millions of other refugees to the roads, having either of the Rhino gauges would have saved me time and frustration in that rush. I also appreciate how easy that the large backlit numbers of the digital gauge are to read for these 49 year old eyes. I need reading glasses for most smaller print, but not for either of the Rhino USA gauges. If you're like me, when you need your reading glasses, they are nowhere to be found! The Rhino USA digital tire pressure gauge illuminated tip and large backlit LCD readout make using it in low light conditions a breeze. The digital unit is compact, very light weight, has an ergo grip design, and operates with a single push button trigger that allows you to cycle through readouts in psi, bar, kpa, and kg/cm. After approx. 30 seconds, the unit will automatically turn itself off, so there is no way to kill the battery by accidentally leaving it on. The analog unit has an easy-to-read 2" readout that glows brightly when exposed to light for just a few seconds. The gauge head is protected with a rubber ring that looks like a gear, giving you a good non-slip place to hold it as well as absorbing shock if you accidentally drop it. The cloth braided rubber filler tube uses brass fittings on both ends that swivel 360 degrees, so in combination with a 45 degree tip fitting, it's easy to get it squarely on your tire's schrader valve fitting without leaking air or the gauge tube binding up. Actual photo of how the Rhino USA analog tire pressure gauge glows (taken with a Samsung Galaxy S6 Active cell phone). Finally, Rhino USA backs up their product with a lifetime warranty and this is huge for tools, something that you can use pretty much forever. Some things you're better off buying once and for me, tools fall into that category. I didn't find any deficiencies using either product and with rather affordable price points on both units, I'm happy to give them five stars. Good job Rhino USA.  Rhino USA analog tire pressure gauge. More info and products @ https://www.rhinousainc.com/
    Posted by Bryan Bosch on Jan 15, 2018

    Supersprox Stealth Sprocket
    Last summer, the folks at Supersprox USA contacted me to ask if I'd like to try to destroy one of their Stealth Rear Sprockets. I guess that I have a reputation of being hard on stuff! I've run both aluminum and steel sprockets from a variety of brands, usually whatever fit the budget, but the lightness of aluminum and longevity of steel found in the Stealth design sounded pretty awesome. A more accurate term is probably "light-ish", because the sprocket is not made entirely from aluminum. It uses a 7075-T6 aluminum center carrier with a nickel coated carbon steel outer ring riveted to it. Supersprox lists the Stealth Sprocket as handling power from motorcycles up to 1400cc, so my GasGas 250 2T dual sport has margin to spare. The Stealth Sprocket is not all business, coming in flashy anodized colors that add some excitement to your hub. I received a 48 tooth sprocket in a nice looking anodized red that compliments my GasGas well, but a few months of Pac NW singletrack have pretty much taken care of the pretty part. But, I'm a function over form guy, so I'm happy. Installation is the same as any other sprocket with mounting bolts/nuts being sold separately. And, don't go cheap! Do the job right and install new hardware with threadlock. I did a weight comparison with the steel sprocket that I removed: All steel: 2lbs. Supersprox USA Stealth: 1lb. 10oz. Weight saved: 6oz. (about the weight of a proper billiard ball.) As a percentage, that's an unspung weight savings of just under 19%. Not sure that this translates into a measurable performance advantage for most recreational riders, but for racers who are looking for every possible edge, saving weight while maintaining durability matters. Since last summer, I've put nearly 1,600 miles on the Stealth Rear Sprocket, two-thirds being technical singletrack and the rest gravel roads and tarmac. I've packed it full of mud, sand, gravel, and lots and lots of snow and ice. It's been used to launch over roots & rocks, 60 mph highway jogs, and a constant barrage of decaying plant life from woods riding. About the only visible wear is that some of the nickel teeth coating has been rubbed off by the chain. So, still tons of life left in this sprocket. I'll have to report back when it finally wears out, but I expect that to be a long while. My testing conditions: For those who'd like to understand how I maintain my drive components, I installed the Stealth Sprocket with a new chain, using the fairly standard "3 finger" GasGas method for tension. I cleaned the chain and sprocket thoroughly after any muddy ride and lubed it up with PJ1 Black Label Chain Lube as needed. So, over-all, what do I think of the Supersprox USA Stealth Rear Sprocket? It's been outstanding. If you're looking to save a little unsprung weight and want your sprocket to stand-up to abuse for a long while, this sprocket is up to the task.  I will definitely be running another one when the time comes. More @ https://www.supersproxusa.com/supersprox-stealth-sprockets/
    Posted by DarkCRF on Dec 26, 2013

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