What PWC should I buy?

19 topics in this forum

    • 0 replies
    • 426 views
    • 13 replies
    • 1,600 views
    • 1 reply
    • 1,476 views
    • 9 replies
    • 1,818 views
    • 12 replies
    • 11,856 views
    • 4 replies
    • 1,929 views
    • 3 replies
    • 2,224 views
    • 6 replies
    • 1,768 views
    • 6 replies
    • 2,106 views
    • 12 replies
    • 7,378 views
    • 0 replies
    • 1,173 views
    • 1 reply
    • 3,445 views
    • 8 replies
    • 2,286 views
    • 7 replies
    • 2,563 views
    • 9 replies
    • 2,117 views
    • 5 replies
    • 1,828 views
    • 1 reply
    • 1,524 views
    • 2 replies
    • 2,352 views
    • 4 replies
    • 2,309 views


  • Featured Content

    Marvin wins a Million and Eli leaves us wondering.
    The Monster Energy Cup is the most significant offseason race for 450 Supercross teams, allowing riders an opportunity to measure their progress with their existing team heading into the 2018 series.  And we can’t forget the million dollar grand prize to any rider who finishes first in all three main events.  For other riders like Justin Barcia, MEC is an audition for any future potential team exploring options.  The unfortunate truth is riders get hurt while preparing for Anaheim 1 in January.  If a team is in need of a last minute fill in, a standout MEC performance can move a rider to the top of the possible replacements list.   The MEC is unlike other Supercross races in format and track design.   Adding in a Joker’s Lane that Marvin admitted in the postrace press conference he forgot about in his first race.  Feld (the promoter) utilizes the Monster Cup as a trial to test format and track changes.  It also allows for amateurs who qualified via Loretta Lynn’s Amateur National a chance to race on a tamed down (highly debatable) Supercross track in front of thousands of spectators, live on TV.  While I enjoyed watching these kids take center stage I also wondered about the safety hazard of sending kids in the middle of puberty (makes them crazy and irrational) out on a track with such aggressive obstacles. The first couple of practices and qualifying sessions looked more like Russian Roulette than Supercross racing. The amateurs represent the epitome of “whatever it takes” and at such a young age unfortunately, some of them need to be protected from themselves.  With that said I thoroughly enjoy watching them show off their incredible talents, but am conflicted if this is good for them or if they are being exploited for entertainment purposes. It only took 7 years, but Marvin Musquin finally duplicated Ryan Villopoto’s inaugural MEC win.  Heading into the first main event the biggest threat to Marvin was Eli Tomac, but Eli went down hard in the first race and was unable to continue the rest of the night.  With Eli out, the race quickly became Musquin’s millions as he easily cruised through three wins to take home the million.  The only rider who appeared to be formidable competition was Jason Anderson.  Both Marvin and Jason train at the Baker’s Factory so it was difficult to imagine a pass from Anderson in the third main event, Anderson’s lap times reflected his lack of aggression.  Let me be clear though, I do NOT think Anderson gave Marvin the win however, if Blake Baggett was the rider going for the million dollars JA would have charged a little harder.  At the postrace press conference I asked Marvin what his thoughts were being “the man” heading into the offseason and in typical Marvin style he downplayed his ride.  He expressed it felt great but it really didn’t carry much weight when Anaheim rolls around.  What was more interesting was the look Jason Anderson shot me when I called Marvin “the man.”  Jason looked as though I had insulted his mother.  While I am sure he is happy for his teammate the truth is these guys don’t achieve the highest level of racing by accepting someone’s performance as better than them.  I suspect tension will come to a boil at the Baker’s Factory this offseason. Eli Tomac remains a mystery.  At times he would lay down a few sections looking like the fastest guy on earth but then he would follow up with a major mistake.  He has a few months to figure things out, but right now Marvin Musquin looks to be the favorite going into 2018.  We all know Ken Roczen says he will be at Anaheim 1 and according to Jeremy McGrath he looks very fast.  The MEC might have created more questions than answers heading into 2018.  Let the bench racing begin, we have a few months to debate and lock in our predictions for 2018.   Nobody was taking a knee during this National Anthem!  Great tribute to the victims of the Vegas shooting too.   After getting throttled by Stephane Roncada while testing out the new Supercross game I decided to sit back and learn.  Game will be released Feb 2018 and it is insanely realistic!
    Posted by Chris Cooksey on Oct 16, 2017

    Will the Fluid Displacement Helmet Liner Render Your Foam Lid Obsolete?
    Kirsh Helmets Debuts With CHM-1, the Toughest, Lowest-profile, DOT-certified Half-shell Helmet on the Market SCHENECTADY, NY – October 11, 2017 – (Motor Sports Newswire) – Kirsh Helmetsa member of the Impact Technologies family, both founded by Jason E. Kirshon, are poised to effect a sea of change in the motorsports and other helmet industries. For decades, legacy compression polystyrene technology (aka foam) has been the standard in helmets, from motorsports to football to snowboarding and any number of other impact sports and activities. No longer. “Has been” is the right way to frame it, because Kirsh Helmets, with its patented fluid-displacement-liner (FDL), is about to make foam to helmets what rotary phones are to cellular technology—obsolete. “We see Kirsh’s fluid displacement liner as a game changer,” said Donnie DeVito, President and Chief Operating Officer of Kirsh Helmets. “It works better than foam, it’s safer and it’s adaptable to any number of sports and high-speed activities.” Kirsh Helmets, Inc., a member of the Impact Technologies family, was formed in late January 2017 to take up the challenge of commercializing the innovative, patented technology invented by Jason Kirshon. Focusing first on solving the problem of unsafe—but popular—novelty half-shell motorcycle helmets, Kirsh’s CHM-1 outperforms “competing” helmets by orders of magnitude in independent testing. At one half of an inch thick, the CHM-1 is the lowest-profile half-shell helmet on the market. Made from the highest-quality materials, coupled with the most-advanced impact technology available, it is also Department of Transportation–certified and entirely manufactured in the U.S.A. Since their inception, the thinking on helmet design has been “more is better.” More foam equals more protection for the head in the event of impact trauma. The independent testing conducted on the Kirsh CHM-1 proves this is not the case. Foam does little to slow down or prevent the brain from slamming into the skull after impact. And the bulk necessary for foam helmets requires more mass, which, in turn, translates into more torque exerted upon the head and neck in the event of a crash. The Kirsh FDL’s silicone and fluid construct mimics the body’s natural protective functions. The brain sits in fluid in the skull. With the FDL, the skull sits in fluid within the helmet. This allows for less mass, reducing impact torque, and a fluid buffer that more effectively protects the skull and brain. And the malleability of the liner ensures that it conforms uniquely to each user’s head, insuring better protection and a custom fit, which means much greater comfort. Size and style are key components that influence consumers. Despite overwhelming evidence that helmet use reduces the likelihood of injury for motorcycle riders, many go without. Kirsh is looking to help change that and reduce traumatic brain injury across the board by offering stylish, low-profile helmets that are safer and work better than their larger, bulkier predecessors. Another compelling feature separating the CHM-1 from all other helmets on the market is its ability to sustain multiple impacts without compromising the helmet’s integrity. And the versatility of the FDL allows for application in half-shell and full-shell helmet designs for any sport or activity that requires the use of head protection, meaning its potential goes far beyond motorsports. So, a question: What do rotary phones, the Ford Edsel, the answering machine, and the foam helmet have in common? Answer: They’re all obsolete relics. Kirsh Helmets is offering the next generation of helmet technology, today, and, for the motorcycle rider, the world is a safer place because of it. About Kirsh Helmets Kirsh Helmets, a member of the Impact Technologies family of companies, is an All-American-Made Helmet Company. Our unique technology brings together style, safety, comfort, and improved performance. Source: Impact Technologies
    Posted by Bryan Bosch on Oct 12, 2017

  • Popular Now