What street bike should I buy?

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    American Motorcyclist Association announces 2018 professional Supercross and Motocross numbers
    September 20, 2017 Motor Sports Newswire PICKERINGTON, OH – September 20, 2017 – (Motor Sports Newswire) –  The American Motorcyclist Association has announced the professional competition numbers for pro-licensed riders competing in Monster Energy AMA Supercross, an FIM World Championship, and the Lucas Oil AMA Pro Motocross Championship for the 2018 season. All riders use the assigned professional number for competition. In addition, the current champion runs the No. 1 plate instead of an assigned professional number when competing in the class or region in which the No. 1 plate was earned. When competing in a class other than the class where the championship was earned, the rider must use the assigned professional number. 2018 Top 100 and Career Pro Numbers for AMA Supercross and Motocross * Career Numbers ** New Career Number for 2018     About the American Motorcyclist Association Founded in 1924, the AMA is a not-for-profit member-based association whose mission is to promote the motorcycle lifestyle and protect the future of motorcycling. As the world’s largest motorcycling rights and event sanctioning organization, the AMA advocates for riders’ interests at all levels of government and sanctions thousands of competition and recreational events every year. The AMA also provides money-saving discounts on products and services for its members. Through the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in Pickerington, Ohio, the AMA honors the heroes and heritage of motorcycling. For more information, visit www.americanmotorcyclist.com. Not a member? Join the AMA today. Source: American Motorcyclist Association
    Posted by Bryan Bosch on Sep 20, 2017

    Fly Racing Lift Stand
    At a ready-to-ride weight (all fluids) right at 330lbs., my 2017 KTM 690 Enduro R is at the max. weight capacity of the Fly Racing Lift Stand. It's simply too heavy for me to lift onto a fixed position stand, so I took my chances. Outside of its lifting capacity meeting my needs, the key feature that made me want this stand was the damper shock that eliminates your bike coming down with a crash landing and the jack pedal snapping upward like a catapult.   Out of the Box The Fly Racing Lift Stand requires some assembly, but just a few nuts & bolts with basic hand tools and a few minutes of your time. No instructions are included, but honestly, they are not necessary. You'll also need a 3mm Allen to lock the adjuster shaft into place that is not included, but I don't know a self respecting dirt bike owner who doesn't own a set of Allen wrenches.   Fit & Finish While the stand isn't blow-you-away well made, for just under a hundred bucks retail, there is nothing to complain about. The welds appear strong, the body finish is powder coated, and the thick rubber top is held on with countersunk wide-head rivets. The jack pedal hardware is substantial, using nylon locking nuts, and its foot pedal pad is covered with stick-on, slip-free grip tape. The rubber feet are pre-installed and look burly.   Function Once assembled, you'll need to adjust the height of the lift pad for your bike's stature. It's adjustable from 10" to 14", listed as fitting "most" dirt bikes, including my somewhat lower 690 Enduro R.  To set the lift height, simply loosen the threaded shaft set screw and rotate the top counter clockwise to the desired height. The top measures 11" X 6.5" and can be locked into whatever orientation suites your application. I do wish that the lift pad footprint was a couple of inches wider so that it made full contact with the entire width of my skid plate. The Fly Racing Lift Stand lifts my portly dual sport without having to jump up & down on the jack pedal and letting the bike down doesn't require a whole lot of force either. As a frame of reference, I live in Florida, we wear flip-flops much of year, and I can operate this lift stand wearing them. In terms of the damper shock, it does a good job of not letting the bike come crashing down. Yes, it's faster/less controlled than say, a car coming down from a hydraulic lift, but I think it works as intended and it met my expectations. In the up position, the rubber footed base is rock-solid on the shop floor, but there is a little play in the threaded shaft assembly. So, the bike doesn't sit quite as securely as on a good fixed stand. Tighter shaft thread tolerances would be appreciated. However, I managed to get a a little "wow" in my front wheel and the bike sat on the Fly Racing Lift Stand with the front wheel removed for a few days without issue. Proof's in the puddin'; the bike didn't hit the floor, including when working on it, so the little bit of play in the shaft assembly hasn't been a material issue.   Bryan's Bottom-line My goal was a lift stand for the shop that allowed me to get the big girl's feet off the floor for various maintenance & repair tasks and the Fly Racing Lift Stand has done what I've asked without issue or complaint. And considering that I'm maxing out its lifting capacity, not too shabby.
    Posted by Bryan Bosch on Sep 18, 2017

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