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XR200 shock rebuild - seal availability

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Has anyone had luck finding a replacement oil seal and wiper for the early style (81-83) XR200R shock?

I have rebuilt a number of the later style (84-91) and had no issue finding parts. (All Balls makes a complete replacement seal head or the seals are still available from Honda to rebuild the original seal head.) The earlier style has a different seal head and the wiper and oil seal do not interchange with the later style. I took samples to my local hydraulics shop who sent them off to a specialty shop to match; they came up empty handed.

Just for kicks, I put an early shock together with a later style seal head. It didn't leak, but it messes up the damping.....specifically there is no bottoming resistance. The only use I have found for the early style shock is that the cylinder has the same ID and can be used to replace a bad cylinder on a later shock if the early spring and spring hardware is also used. (cylinder OD is larger on the early ones than the later style.)

Any tips would be appreciated,

Darin

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I can't help other than recommending what you have already said.

I have not done before but I am interested to know how.

How do you release the 200 + pressure from the res and then refill it with the nitrogen again. Do you have special tooling???

Anything you can offer me here would be great also.

Cheers.

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The nitrogen is contained in a rubber bladder. You can just bleed off the pressure with the schrader valve. Unless the bladder is ruptured, only nitrogen will come out. (It only holds a tiny amount) After servicing the shock you will need a tank of clean/dry nitrogen and a pressure regulator that will go up to 142psi (per Honda manual for xr200 shock.) Racetech and others sell such regulators. Most bike shops have this stuff and will pressurize your shock for you. I know there are reasons to not use air: oxygen will break down the rubber bladder, condensate can corrode stuff,etc. I suppose you could take the risk and use compressed air at least temporarily if getting nitrogen is a big issue.....its probably not worth missing a ride over.

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The nitrogen is contained in a rubber bladder. You can just bleed off the pressure with the schrader valve. Unless the bladder is ruptured, only nitrogen will come out. (It only holds a tiny amount) After servicing the shock you will need a tank of clean/dry nitrogen and a pressure regulator that will go up to 142psi (per Honda manual for xr200 shock.) Racetech and others sell such regulators. Most bike shops have this stuff and will pressurize your shock for you. I know there are reasons to not use air: oxygen will break down the rubber bladder, condensate can corrode stuff,etc. I suppose you could take the risk and use compressed air at least temporarily if getting nitrogen is a big issue.....its probably not worth missing a ride over.

Can you post a link to the pressure regulator that you are talking about.

Cheers and great advice.

My manual says, for my rear shock that it has 285 psi in it.

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The pressure regulators I am familiar with are like this: http://racetech.com/images/TSNR01_600.jpg There are lots of industrial sources for these as well. They are basically the same thing used on welding tanks, except the welding ones usually only go up to about 50psi on the regulated side.

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