Changing tires for the first time in 15 years...God Help me.

I've had it with the shops. It was bad enough that they were charging $20 per tire, now they wanna jack it up to $25. I've had dirt bikes for 15 years and have only tried one other time (which involved a lot of blood and causing). I bought all the right tools (Motion pro tire irons, plastic rim protectors, the rim lock/ holder, etc). Went to Jiffy Lube and asked for a oil drum to lay my tire on. Went to Home Depot and bought a hose to cut in half to lay my tire on (so my spokes dont get banged up, and the spoke fits more securely on the drum). I guess I also need some type of powder (baby powder) for the tubes....Does WD-40 work for lubrication to slide the tires on with the tire Irons?

I just ordered some really nice rims from KSR in Pennsylvania for my CRF...I dont want to nick them up....kinda scared!

God Help me! I'll watch some youtube videos on how to change tires...they make it look so easy, but as we all know with dirt bikes....its never as easy as someone or a video makes it look.

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I just use a water/soap mix on the tire when putting them on/taking off. I would use that over WD-40. Take your time and get an extra pair of hands the first couple that you do. Make sure you get the bead down in the the drop portion of the rim. Lay the tires out in the sun to get some heat in them and make them in a little more pliable if you can. It's definitely an art... good luck.

WD-40 is the best tire lube of all. allows tire to seat on rim better than anything I have used. Dries and sticks to the rim very well, tire wont slip.

WD-40 is the best tire lube of all. allows tire to seat on rim better than anything I have used. Dries and sticks to the rim very well, tire wont slip.

Will it eventually ruin the black rim? As far as the annodization (sp.) goes?

I use windex for lube

Ok the key to changing a tireis making sure the mounted bead is pushed in as far as you can to the center of the rim hoop which is narrower than the outside. Put more effort into pushing the bead into the center than levering. If levering is taking any more than medium force then the bead is not centered in the hoop somewere. If you put all your effort towards this rather than levering, tires go on super easy. Most front tires I can do by hand (no levers) the first side and then a little levering on the finnish. When using irons take small bites. Lever over with first iron, then back off iron half way to insert second iron, and so on.

Also makes life 100X easier if tire is hot, either in the baking sun a hour or throw it in front of a heater awhile in winter.

Lots of lube, either soapy water or WD40.

With a little practise tire changes take minutes.

Edited by tribalbc

Ok the key to changing a tireis making sure the mounted bead is pushed in as far as you can to the center of the rim hoop which is narrower than the outside. Put more effort into pushing the bead into the center than levering. If levering is taking any more than medium force then the bead is not centered in the hoop somewere. If you put all your effort towards this rather than levering, tires go on super easy. Most front tires I can do by hand (no levers) the first side and then a little levering on the finnish. When using irons take small bites. Lever over with first iron, then back off iron half way to insert second iron, and so on.

Also makes life 100X easier if tire is hot, either in the baking sun a hour or throw it in front of a heater awhile in winter.

Lots of lube, either soapy water or WD40.

With a little practise tire changes take minutes.

This is good advice. I use three 8" motion pro tire irons. I use one under the rim lock to hold the bead like a bead buddy, then work my way around the rim with the other two irons. This works for removing and installing tires. I also warm my tires in the sun and use WD40 for lubing the bead.

I use silicon spray, works great, Amour All works good too and of course soap and water. removing the tire I get the beads to the out side so the rim is in the tire and then pull the rim out, putting it back on I struggle but I do it on the ground on a piece of wood, I also have a one a friend made that goes in the receiver of my truck and has a 3/4 bolt that goes through the hub, nice to have something that locks the wheel down.

Practice makes perfect. Everyone has stuggled with tires and rims at one time or another and especially starting out. You'll work out your own technique but Tribal has some pretty good tips in his post. Sounds like your on the right track. I still do my tires on the ground though and use a heavy concentrate of dish soap and water as lube.

What the he!! kind of tire last 15 years???

Need me one of them.

Edited by markit

A lot of guys run into trouble because they focus on the bead that they are levering and not the bead getting into the drop center of the rim. For stubborn tires, like ice tires, you can use the box end of a 15mm or 5/8 wrenches to stick into the bead seating area. They will keep the bead in the drop center.

At some trail rides it has become a tradition for me to do tires for people. You bring me the wheel, the tire and make sure that I have beer and I've done as many as ten in a row while BSing around the fire.. Some guys never seem to get the hang of it. They are not an issue for me.

Edited by shagger

15 years at $20 to $25--you probably could have bought yourself a nice used bike or two! I agree with the posts above about keeping the bead down in that center channel. If you are having trouble, get a human helper to keep that bead down (I've never really had much luck with that "bead buddy" thing). That simple act of keeping the bead in the center channel make the whole thing work, or not work

Try windex (or generic) as a lube. I've used pretty much everything listed in this post over the years, and windex seems to work as well as any of them, plus it's cheap, not messy, and won't contaminate your brake rotor (although I still hit the rotor with brake cleaner before final assembly).

To me, the worst part of changing a tire is getting the valve stem through the rim hole. I would like to hear other methods, but here is what works for me:

1. On the back side I take a single tire iron and just move a little area of the bead outside the rim, right at the rim hole.

2. On the front side, I put a couple of 1.5 inch (or so) wood blocks between the rim and the bead to hold the bead up enough to get my hand in to work the stem in place.

To me, the worst part of changing a tire is getting the valve stem through the rim hole. I would like to hear other methods.

I have found that it's easiest to get the valve stem inserted into the rim by putting the tube into the bare tire, then inserting the rim/wheel completely inside both sides of the tire with the valve stem lined up with the hole in the rim. Once the rim is inside the tire, it's easy to pull the rim back into the tire on the opposite side of the valve stem hole to get enough clearance to access the stem and line it up with the hole in the rim.

I use the same technique for removing tires. After breaking the bead, I pull the tire beads over each side of the rim so the wheel is completely inside the tire, then you can push the wheel deep inside the tire on one side and easily pull wheel out of the tire by the opposite side of the wheel.

I learned this a long time ago from a pro enduro guy, and it's made my life a whole lot easier.

A lot of guys run into trouble because they focus on the bead that they are levering and not the bead getting into the drop center of the rim. For stubborn tires, like ice tires, you can use the box end of a 15mm or 5/8 wrenches to stick into the bead seating area. They will keep the bead in the drop center.

At some trail rides it has become a tradition for me to do tires for people. You bring me the wheel, the tire and make sure that I have beer and I've done as many as ten in a row while BSing around the fire.. Some guys never seem to get the hang of it. They are not an issue for me.

Or for when using a mousse....

Tire001.jpg

The pros at a track use Windex because it dries quickly. Sometimes too quickly on a warm windy day but it works. The problem with WD-40, silicone, grease (!?!?) is that they stay slippery and may add to the problem of the tire slipping on the rim. I use a soap like dish soap in a squirt bottle. When it dries, it's more tacky than slippery. One thing that made it easier for me was so simple...........3 TIRE IRONS.

Edited by motoxvet

I use Armorall for lube. Works great, and when it dries it doesn't leave any residue.

I also use baby powder on the tube to prevent it from fusing with the tire longer term.

And when putting in a new tire, these are knuckle savers when pulling the valve stem in.

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Edited by mjskier

Thanks for all the help/ tips guys...this is was Thumper Talk is all about.

Wow, I've been changing tires for 45 years and as the saying goes, you can always learn something new. Thank TTer's. :-)

Or for when using a mousse....

Tire001.jpg

That photo is awesome. It needs a beer for scale though. :)

My mechanic charges only $10 for a tire change and my rims look amazing :)

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