The condition of this axle indicates...

1. Rode hard and put up wet?

2. No problem, who needs grease and maintenance?

3. We don't need to do no stinking wrenching, let's go for a ride!

4. All of the above.

I do believe it means I might as well order the bearing for the wheel and the linkage. Should I buy a new axle, or just clean this one up?

Should I go with Honda parts for the linkage, or after market? Wheel bearings?

What about inside the hub? Just ream it out and grease it up?

Thanks for looking!

IMG_20130122_210543.jpg

IMG_20130122_210630.jpg

IMG_20130122_211208.jpg

IMG_20130122_210855.jpg

All of the above.

It seems to me, the fit / slop between bearings and axle will be worse with new bearings and a cleaned up axle than it would be if you just reused everything. The bearing surface on the head end of the bolt looks pretty bad. See what you think after getting it cleaned up, but I wouldn't discount springing for a new one.

You'll want new spacers too. The center of the bolt and the sleeve inside the hub are not critical. You could just clean up the sleeve. When you remove the wheel bearings you'll be able to remove the sleeve for cleaning. You know not to do anything to the bearings races and seats of the hub other than wiping them down to clean them.

I'd go OEM Honda parts.

I see the swingarm is missing the chain slider. Looks like the top mounting screw for it is sheered off and still in the hole.

I hate to ask, but have you had the swingarm bolt out yet? Before you go ordering parts, might as well find out the condition of those bearings, bolt and seals too.

Sprocket teeth look a little warped/breaking. It looks worn out, may be time for a new one.

I've removed the chain guide and swing arm protector. I do have a new chain and sprockets to put on. I will order the Honda parts for the axle, collars and wheel bearings. I've never replaced bearings. A first time for everything. My ST1300 wants steering bearings.

I'm guessing I'll need the linkage rebuild parts once I get in there.

Edited by MarxMyth

...I will order the Honda parts for the axle, collars and wheel bearings.....

Good idea, I would not use those parts either. But you don't really need OEM bearings if you feel like saving a little cash.

Bearings are easy to change 99% of the time.

If rear axle is that bad, you need to check both the swing arm bolt and front axle too. All of the electrical connects and grounds should be cleaned.

I took apart the linkage and the swing arm bolt. I'm going to try to just clean and grease all of that. There was grease on the swing arm bolt. I'm already into some $75+ in parts for the axle and wheel. I can really use a new rear brake rotor as well. Gotta love this bargain bike!

Consider yourself very lucky. It is very common for those swingarm pivot bolts to be SEIZED in place.

I had a 400ex once that I ended up cutting the swingarm off to get it out...... I tried every possible method of removal, and spent months of time tinkering with it then just decided it was going to have to go under the torch....

In my opinion, all of these bearings last a very long time. IF they are properly packed with grease on a regular basis. I ride about about 2000+ hard miles a year here in Ohio and I repack my wheel bearings about 4 times a year, and I do my swingarm, linkage, and shock once a year. Just did the steering stem for the first time also. It was in need of some love.

Another overlooked maintenance item is the brake caliper slider pins. NOT the pin that holds the pads in place, but the sliders that allow the caliper to "float"

Agree 100% with RedBlack above.

Also, some sand paper and a wire brush will clean all that up real nice.

Maybe clean the axle, new bearings and dust seals for the wheels, new rotor and the sprocket I have. I'll take the brake apart as well for a cleaning as well. Need new pads with the rotor. The brake cylinder is pretty clean. I also need to make one of the fork tools to change out the seals. Also need new fork covers.

I suppose there is some sort of benefit of going through every system on the bike and bringing it up to spec as opposed to buying a bike that looks cherry and that lulls you in to a false sense of security? Nahhh.

I'm already into this bike at least $1900. Consolation is I didn't buy it to flip it, but to ride it. Every system on this bike was/is below nominal.

I suppose there is some sort of benefit of going through every system on the bike and bringing it up to spec as opposed to buying a bike that looks cherry and that lulls you in to a false sense of security? Nahhh.

I'm already into this bike at least $1900. Consolation is I didn't buy it to flip it, but to ride it. Every system on this bike was/is below nominal.

Still cheaper than a new bike. And having gone thru it so well, another consolation will be your confidence in it's reliability to take you out and get you back. For the trails some us find ourselves on, that fact alone is priceless.

All Balls Wheel Bearing Kit - 2001 Honda XR400R (Front)

1093800010

$13.99

1

$13.99 All Balls Wheel Bearing Kit - 2001 Honda XR400R (Rear)

1093800060

$14.99

1

$14.99 Tusk Stainless Steel Brake Rotor, Rear - 2001 Honda XR400R

1097440006

$39.99

1

$39.99 Neutron Brake Pad - Sintered Metal - 2001 Honda XR400R (Rear)

1261170007

$9.25

1

$9.25 Daystar Fork Boots "69" Series Black - 2001 Honda XR400R

1276530001

$27.99

1

$27.99 Fly Racing Kinetic Mesh-Tech Jersey 2012 X-Large Black/White

1388000004

$14.99

1

$14.99 Subtotal: $121.20 Tax: $0.00 Shipping: $Free! Disposal: $0.00 Gift Wrapping: $0.00 Payment: $121.20 (BML) Total: $121.20

The above is my shopping list from RMATV. Great store I think. I can get Honda parts and other stuff from a big bike shop here in town at cost plus because I work for its parent company. Somehow seems easier to just order online. I don't have a bearing puller. These look they really need to be pulled, and not pushed out (at least the first one). Any tips here?

Notice the cheap brake pad. Matter much?

There is always this approach to removing the bearings. Not much of a soundtrack, but I like the special earthquake effects.

Edited by MarxMyth

IMG_20130129_110620.JPG

New fork boots, rear brake rotor and pads, bearings and dust seals.

Rocky Mountain ATV has always been a pleasure to work with. The daystar fork boots are a nice heavy duty rubber. $27 for pair.

Edited by MarxMyth

Now that the wheel bearings are there. When you go to set them, find a socket or something to drive the bearings in on the outer race. If you drive the bearings in using the inner race you will destroy them. You can buy a set of bearing drivers meant for most bikes for about 50 bucks.

I will try the socket approach fist. I'll see how close I get to matching them...

I have a 27mm torque wrench socket that fits the smaller bearing, nothing big enough for the larger. It wants a diameter around 45mm.

Don't forget the spacer between the bearings or you will destroy the new bearing taking it apart.

Here are two tools to have that make things go better.

http://pitposse.com/beraandsedr.html

http://pitposse.com/whbereset.html

The bearing drivers can be used to set the seals. Make sure the bearing is seated before you install the seal. When the bearing is seated you will hear a ringing sound. And as said make sure the spacer between the wheel bearings is in place before you drive the second bearing in place! Also clean--clean and a bit of oil will help set the bearings in their seats.

Edited by Ohio Rusty Spokes

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