Frond end "tucking" in corners?

I did some searching and was only able to find one thread that talked about this and it wasn't very helpful to me.

I just had my forks and shock serviced and my sag is at 102 with a RG3 link (08 crf450). The forks are up to what I'm assuming is the line on the forks. And all the clickers are in the middle. (Still need to play with this but am really unsure of what way I need to go) I feel like if I try and get to far forward on the seat the front end kinda wants to tuck and I have to put my foot out and catch myself so I tend to ride closrr to the middle or just behind the middle of the seat and I don't have this issue. Any suggestions?

Im not an expert but I think to help with this you need to turn your rebound out on the forks, so in other words make the the rebound faster.

Maybe some of the experts will reply.

Edited by edge22

I did some searching and was only able to find one thread that talked about this and it wasn't very helpful to me.

I just had my forks and shock serviced and my sag is at 102 with a RG3 link (08 crf450). The forks are up to what I'm assuming is the line on the forks. And all the clickers are in the middle. (Still need to play with this but am really unsure of what way I need to go) I feel like if I try and get to far forward on the seat the front end kinda wants to tuck and I have to put my foot out and catch myself so I tend to ride closrr to the middle or just behind the middle of the seat and I don't have this issue. Any suggestions?

This is a problem that I have had many times in riding. Something that I find helps is obviously just staying on the gas and being on it harder. I like to get really far up on the seat too, but I think leaning the bike more also helps. Besides that I'm not too sure, add pressure in front tire.

How did the bike corner before you got the suspension done?

Was your sag and clickers the same back then? Changing sag will affect the bikes handling characteristics big time.

How did the bike corner before you got the suspension done?

Was your sag and clickers the same back then? Changing sag will affect the bikes handling characteristics big time.

Honestly I can't 100% remember. I just bought the bike and road it maybe once or twice before I had the suspension serviced. The sag was way off because of spring rate. The clickers are different now. The guy who did the suspension just put it all in the middle and I didn't think to write it down because I didn't think they would change them.

Thats alright, you'll just have to start from scratch. The Suspension section has alot of good pinned topics you could read over.

For this issue, I would start with decreasing the fork rebound (CCW), just 2 clicks at a time till you find the best clicker setting. Try turning the clickers in afterwards to feel the difference it makes.

Heres one of many articles you can go through to help tune your suspension up: http://www.thumpertalk.com/topic/223133-adjust-your-dampening/

Im not an expert but I think to help with this you need to turn your rebound out on the forks, so in other words make the the rebound faster.

Maybe some of the experts will reply.

As edge said, softening up the front fork dampening helped me a lot. I had my suspension done and they just set the clickers as a starting point. Faster rebound on the forks improves traction up to a point but I think you have to start changing one thing at a time and see how it feels. Start with front forks, adjust rebound dampening softer 4 clicks, if it feels better, go another 2 clicks, if it gets worse move it back to where it was before and right it down.

Before I softened my rebound dampening I felt like my front end would just wash out in an instant, almost like the ground was being removed from under me (tire wasn't tracking because rebound was too slow).

Its the bike setup . Sounds like the compression is too soft. Try going in 2-3 clicks. Going out on the rebound will make your front end push out coming out of corners.

I believe it is rebound dampening and that stiffening up compression dampening will make your problem worse as traction usually decreases with increased dampening (There are extremes where you can have too little dampening I know). Try both though and treat it like an experiment where you only adjust one variable at a time. First warm up with the suspension the way it is and then adjust your rebound dampening 4 clicks softer and see how it feels maybe even write down your observation. Then set your rebound dampening back to where it was at the beginning of the day and stiffen up your compression dampening 4 clicks and see how that feels. That little exercise should answer the differing opinions you are seeing here. There is never truly a right answer because it is what feels best to you but in my opinion you will be much happier with the adjustment you make to rebound dampening.

Either way, let us know the results.

Edited by captainhog

Thank you for your input. Another thing I have been thinking about is I have been trying to practice standing up threw some of the more open corners and I actually had the front end tuck on me a couple times. Would this be the same problem or is this going to be more body position? I try and bend my knees and ride over the front of the bike and lean it over any time I am standing and going threw a corner.

So much goes into cornering that it could be a number of things. I highly suggest streaming all of volume 3 of Gary semics instructional videos, then you can start to answer the questions better yourself than me guessing at what you may be doing wrong. Start with the first one in the series, I was shocked when i watched it and realized how much i was doing wrong.

So much goes into cornering that it could be a number of things. I highly suggest streaming all of volume 3 of Gary semics instructional videos, then you can start to answer the questions better yourself than me guessing at what you may be doing wrong. Start with the first one in the series, I was shocked when i watched it and realized how much i was doing wrong.

Well I watched quite a few of his videos and ended up lowering the forks in the clamps and didn't really seam to have the tucking problem anymore. I can make it threw corners pretty good but need to work on leaning the bike over more in he deeper rutted corners. Practice practice practice!

No one has mentioned your front tire? Is it new, what PSI are you running? What type of tire on what kind of terrian?

No one has mentioned your front tire? Is it new, what PSI are you running? What type of tire on what kind of terrian?

Tire is in pretty good condition. Its a Dunlop mx51 front and I'm running 12psi in the front. I would say loamy terrain.

Did you try softening the rebound dampening for your forks?

Did you try softening the rebound dampening for your forks?

I messed with it a little but just wanted to get some laps in and try out what I did with lowering the forks first. I'm going back out saturday and sunday and going to really start playing wuth the fork and shock settings.

Its good to change only one thing at a time but I thought you were trying to fix the issue with your front end tucking. I always thought fork height affected stability which is basically how easily the bike wants lean over but did not affect traction.

Its good to change only one thing at a time but I thought you were trying to fix the issue with your front end tucking. I always thought fork height affected stability which is basically how easily the bike wants lean over but did not affect traction.

Well I streamed quite a few of Gery Semics videos and the fork height is one thing he talked about and said it affects this issue along with stability. So I started there first.

Tire is in pretty good condition. Its a Dunlop mx51 front and I'm running 12psi in the front. I would say loamy terrain.

There's a big part of your problem right there. The MX51 front is notoriously unpredictable tire. Most everyone I've talked to steers clear of it. If you have the means I would switch it out for the MX31, Michelin MS3, MH3 or Bridgestone 403.

There's a big part of your problem right there. The MX51 front is notoriously unpredictable tire. Most everyone I've talked to steers clear of it. If you have the means I would switch it out for the MX31, Michelin MS3, MH3 or Bridgestone 403.

That's good to know. The rear tire is getting close to to point of needing replaced. Maybe I will just switch rather than just buying a new rear tire.

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