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question about yamalink setup

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I ordered a yamalink yesterday, I'm falling over way too much on the trail and need to be lower to have some extra stability while stopping, to put my feet on the ground.

my main question is, Is lowering the rear directly proportional to lowering the front?

for example, I lower the rear 1.5" I need to lower the front 1.5" to get the stock settings?

I can't get 1.5" out of the forks as the handlebars are in the way, but I was thinking of ordering risers and a shorter height bar, to get more room.

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No they are not directly proportional. Spring preload also has to do with riding height, so keep that in mind. Also keep in mind that sliding the forks up in the clamps will alter your geometry and make the bike handle differently. It should make it more on the twitchy side. Toegether with the lowering link you might be okay, but its going to take some trial and error on your end to find what best suits you. You can also shave seat foam.

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No they are not directly proportional. Spring preload also has to do with riding height, so keep that in mind. Also keep in mind that sliding the forks up in the clamps will alter your geometry and make the bike handle differently. It should make it more on the twitchy side. Toegether with the lowering link you might be okay, but its going to take some trial and error on your end to find what best suits you. You can also shave seat foam.

cool, thanks for the help.

I had one more question if anyone knows.

How critical is it that I get a spring for my weight for the rear shock with the yamalink?

I ordered one from bike bandit monday when I ordered the yamalink, but the yamalink will be here tomorrow and the spring hasn't even shipped yet, I'd like to ride it this weekend if possible. not sure If the results will be lame afterwards though.

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You dont have to disassemble the shock to put on the link, where as the spring you will. Put your link on, ride, then do the spring. But its only wednesday it may reach you by friday then you can do both before you ride this weekend. Spring rate/suspension is of the greatest importance IMO. Correct suspension setup in general should be priority over power mods any day of the week. A lot of riders, especially in the 4 stroke world; spend 1000+ dollars on a full ti exhaust in a flash for their new thumper but will neglect to spend a few hundred on their suspension to make it work for them- instead of against them. Every good rider will always tell you "suspension first". Do what you can afford. If you cant afford to revalve, at least do springs and oil change if needed, and get your clickers where you like 'em. You will be amazed at the amount of speed you can pick up without much extra effort when your suspension is set up for you.

As for the yamalink, is it a lowering link? I am assuming it is... You'll need to look into any reccomentations the directions say that come with the link. (if any) From what ive learned, a lowering link will soften the initial effort of the rear suspension to make it easier for the rear shock to transition into the mid part of the stroke. MXA wrecking crew has many reviews on different lowering links with great results on previously bad handling bikes. I suggest you head over there and do some searching around. For the most part, if your spring rate is correct you should be looking good in the rear shock department once you get your sag set.

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You dont have to disassemble the shock to put on the link, where as the spring you will. Put your link on, ride, then do the spring. But its only wednesday it may reach you by friday then you can do both before you ride this weekend. Spring rate/suspension is of the greatest importance IMO. Correct suspension setup in general should be priority over power mods any day of the week. A lot of riders, especially in the 4 stroke world; spend 1000+ dollars on a full ti exhaust in a flash for their new thumper but will neglect to spend a few hundred on their suspension to make it work for them- instead of against them. Every good rider will always tell you "suspension first". Do what you can afford. If you cant afford to revalve, at least do springs and oil change if needed, and get your clickers where you like 'em. You will be amazed at the amount of speed you can pick up without much extra effort when your suspension is set up for you.

As for the yamalink, is it a lowering link? I am assuming it is... You'll need to look into any reccomentations the directions say that come with the link. (if any) From what ive learned, a lowering link will soften the initial effort of the rear suspension to make it easier for the rear shock to transition into the mid part of the stroke. MXA wrecking crew has many reviews on different lowering links with great results on previously bad handling bikes. I suggest you head over there and do some searching around. For the most part, if your spring rate is correct you should be looking good in the rear shock department once you get your sag set.

thanks for the info again, yeah it is a lowering link. The spring is supposed to be here tomorrow, so looks like I will have it in time. Most of the money I've spent on the bike has been on taming it, so I probably should have realized it was too tall for me to begin with and worked on lowering it first, and getting the suspension set up for me. I was sure I'd be able to cope with it though. Oh, well you live and you learn, next thing will be fork springs :thumbsup:

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