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Estimated cost/time to take a bike to the frame, powdercoat it, and put it back together.

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I'm looking for an estimation of how long it should take to strip a bike to the frame, powdercoat it and then put it back together.

No engine work or suspension work. Just taken bike apart to powdercoat frame and putting it back together. I'm no mechanical prodigy but I know I can do the job. I work at a moderately slow pace but would have 2-3 hours a night to work on the bike.

Also for those who have done it. How much does it cost to get a frame blasted and powdercoated? What was the turn around time for dropping off the frame and picking it up?

Bike would be a 125cc two stroke.

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At a moderately slow pace probably 2 nights to take it apart probably a maximum of a week to prep and powder coat it and probably 3 or 4 nights to put it back together so all together probably a minimum of 1 1/2 to 2 weeks and the cost depends on what color black is the cheapest and will probably cost about 100-200 to prep and powder coat it any other color other than white will probably be 300+

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Just did my sons 04' YZ125 and it only took me a couple hours to take the bike apart. If you are not doing any upgrades and just geting the frame done then you can take the bike apart in biger sub assemblies. Front end, swingarm, read subframe, ect. I paid around $200 to get his frame preped and powder coated. It took the shop three weeks to get it back to me but it was winter and I was in no rush. Puting the bike back together will take a little longer as you may need to grind a few painted areas to get thing back together. I did a total overhaul so I took every part off and greased it and put in all new bearing so it took way longer to put things back together. Hope that helps. Good luck.

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I'm an average mechanic and it took me about 2.5 hours to disassemble my '13 250SX and maybe 4-5 hours to put it all back together, greasing and cleaning everything as I went.

I spent $255 powdercoating the frame.

PS. DON"T powdercoat aluminum parts.

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I wouldn't take the bike apart in "bigger" sections... If you are going to take the time & strip it 2 bare frame then take the extra time & take it ALL apart & check ALL the bearings, grease the axles, check the cables etc etc. As far as time goes... I have never done it to a dirt bike BUT I did it w/ an 03 Honda 400ex. I tore the bike COMPLETELY down to bare frame, had it powder coated silver = $150 & reassembled w/ new bearings in 5 days. This was also done in the evenings when I would get off work. I would get home around 4:30ish & work till around 8.

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Explain your reasoning.

Pretty simple really. The temps used in Powdercoating weakens aluminum.

My first experience w/ this phenomenon was when I powdercoated an aluminum GSXR750 wheel and on the next ride, it broke on me sending me over the bars at about 80mph. I had it tested (actually my attorney sent it out) and the metal had been weakened. I declined to sue the powdercoater even though the injury cost me mobility in my shoulder and probably $50K in lost wages and medical bills.

SVRIM021.jpg

Since then I have learned that Mountain bikers have found that powdercoating a frame will often lead to breakage or bending soon afterwards.

I know that most MX frames are not stressed to the limit like Mountain bike frames cause those guys are all about lightweight. I also know that most powdercoaters will tell you that powdercoating aluminum is fine. But I'm here to tell you it most definitely is not.

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Sucks for your injury but sounds like the wreck messed up a little more than you thought if you didn't sue. That's life or death man. You can't just hop up and be like " good one guys! Y'all got me there :)". Iv seen numerous frames, wheels, and mountain bikes powder coated and never personally seen anyone's stuff just break in half. Even mountain bikes. Some mountain bike setups out there are around 5-6k with badass suspension on them and you can go just as crazy on the look of those as you can a Mx bike. I DNt think its justifiable what you are saying unless maybe it's been powder coated numerous numerous times and somehow got weaker. Idk. I say you can powder coat softer metals.

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And you would think if someone's stuff just split in half on hear there would be a thread on it by now popping up somewhere

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I had a frame on my 2004 rm 250 powder coated and within a few rides one of the main frame mounts developed a huge crack. I rode the "A" class back then so it was rode hard, but I blame the powder coating for this problem, I guess the heat weakened the welds, so I never powder coat anything now.

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Pretty simple really. The temps used in Powdercoating weakens aluminum.

My first experience w/ this phenomenon was when I powdercoated an aluminum GSXR750 wheel and on the next ride, it broke on me sending me over the bars at about 80mph. I had it tested (actually my attorney sent it out) and the metal had been weakened. I declined to sue the powdercoater even though the injury cost me mobility in my shoulder and probably $50K in lost wages and medical bills.

SVRIM021.jpg

Since then I have learned that Mountain bikers have found that powdercoating a frame will often lead to breakage or bending soon afterwards.

I know that most MX frames are not stressed to the limit like Mountain bike frames cause those guys are all about lightweight. I also know that most powdercoaters will tell you that powdercoating aluminum is fine. But I'm here to tell you it most definitely is not.

Sorry to hear of your issue. That's crazy I have powder coated a ton of stuff and never had issues, ill be a little more cautious now! ... My F250 aluminum wheels are powdered and no issues thus far.

Did he powder coat it 2 tone? The wheel looks stock to me but idk

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Thanks everyone for the replies. I now have a very good idea of how much time it will take and money it will cost me.

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Thanks everyone for the replies. I now have a very good idea of how much time it will take and money it will cost me.

No problem! Good luck & most important = HAVE FUN!!! I enjoy that kind of stuff & LOVE 2 turn wrenches on my stuff... Sometimes I will take stuff apart & put back together cause im bored & then start timing myself & see how fast I can do it!!! Great way to know your bike inside & out!!!

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Pretty simple really. The temps used in Powdercoating weakens aluminum.

My first experience w/ this phenomenon was when I powdercoated an aluminum GSXR750 wheel and on the next ride, it broke on me sending me over the bars at about 80mph. I had it tested (actually my attorney sent it out) and the metal had been weakened. I declined to sue the powdercoater even though the injury cost me mobility in my shoulder and probably $50K in lost wages and medical bills.

SVRIM021.jpg

Since then I have learned that Mountain bikers have found that powdercoating a frame will often lead to breakage or bending soon afterwards.

I know that most MX frames are not stressed to the limit like Mountain bike frames cause those guys are all about lightweight. I also know that most powdercoaters will tell you that powdercoating aluminum is fine. But I'm here to tell you it most definitely is not.

That's the first time I've ever seen that. Sounds like suzuki had a weak temper to begin with and the oven worsened it. I've powdercoated frames, swingarms and powerstroke wheels and never ever had a single problem.

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Once a frame is stripped, and the swingarm removed I fill all the threaded tabs, and mounts with old bolts, to keep them from getting coated. I also wrap tape over a the steering stem mount ont the headstock, and around the swingarm mounts so the coater will know to seal them wth his tape

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Awsome thanks for the tips. I'm going to call a few places to make sure they have done a frame before.

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A 125 should take about 2 hours to strip to the frame. No need to remove the wheels, just leave them attached to the forks/swingarm etc. same goes for the handlebars, shock, etc. Leave as much assembled as possible.

Powdercoating should cost about $150. As far as the heat from the powdercoating affecting the strength of the frame, it shouldn't be an issue as long as the powdercoat over isn't much over 350 degrees F. Most powdercoat ovens are set around 350. 350 also happens to be close to the temp that many aluminum alloys are heat treated at.

The only time heat becomes an issue with aluminum is if it exposed to temperatures considerably above 350 degrees. Aluminum can become annealed and very soft if exposed to very high temperatures (800 plus degrees)and suddenly cooled (unlike steel and steel alloys).

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I can strip a bike to the frame and put it back together carefully with loctite, anti-seize, and correct torque specifications 6-7 hours. You could probably take it apart in a night and take 2 or 3 nights to put it back together. Make sure you make note of cable routing and document/take pictures on disassembly so you can put it back together correctly. Speaking from experience, it's not always as easy as one thinks to remember how things came apart and go back together with a week or two in between.

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