Rear brake pedal bushing

Can the rear brake pedal bushing be replaced? I did not see one listed in the TT parts site. I bought a used one off Ebay to tinker around with and it seems to have too much side to side movement.

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It is inside here.

Thanks , Jesse

Edited by Rock Slyde

I'm pretty sure they come with a new brake pedal. Although on my old Honda shadow I made one and replaced it.

I'd just buy a new pedal unless you really don't want to spend the money, then make one :thumbsup:

Per the PM, correct, not a OEM service part...

New pedal at $95.20

Or have a bushing made

Or modify the whole thing and have a bearing installed.

drz153_zps429da52a.jpg

Looks great. Nice job on the detail work...

I have also noticed a little movement in my brake pedal, If you can't get a bushing easily let me know, maybe I will machine a couple.

Thanks Radtech, but I still have my original brake pedal that has no play in it. I'll put this tip on that one now that I know I can and hopefully I will not screw it up and have to buy a new one. :doh:

Per the PM, correct, not a OEM service part...

New pedal at $95.20

Or have a bushing made

Or modify the whole thing and have a bearing installed.

Any suggestions for bushing material?

Can the rear brake pedal bushing be replaced?

Dude, we want some pics of that kick #ss black frame DRZ of yours!

Looks great. Nice job on the detail work...

I have also noticed a little movement in my brake pedal, If you can't get a bushing easily let me know, maybe I will machine a couple.

I could use a replacement bushing as well... my pedal has a good amount of lateral play.

I could use a replacement bushing as well... my pedal has a good amount of lateral play.

I removed the bolt from the brake pivot to get a couple of basic dimensions. The O.D. of the bushing is 21mm and the OD of the pivot bolt is 14.90mm. Looking at the available bushings, this seems to be the best match to work from http://www.mcmaster.com/#standard-sleeve-bearings/=mft48c $4.59 each for the standard SAE 841 bushing, the graphite version is $6.60 each.

My pivot pin/bolt was slighty out of round, so the pin needs to be turned slightly and then the bushings machined to match the new pin O.D. Not a big machining job but I think that if someone wants one, I would need to clean up the bolt also. I will order a bushing and machine it on the weekend and let you know how it works... The first one takes some time to get right, the rest are pretty easy. :thumbsup:

Rad...Unless you removed the bushing from the brake lever.. Im pretty sure you are talking about the Inner Dimension of the lever bushing.. Yes?

Second,,, using a standard size available bushing is not going to get the user much improvement unless the current lever bushing and pivot are severely worn.(Rad, I see you are talking about finial sizing the off the shelf bushing to fit... this comment not really pointed at you)

To see significant improvement, the bushing after install (and the ID being undersized at this point) will need to be reamed to final size and clearance for the supplied pivot bolt OD dimension.

Just pressing in an off the shelf bushing really is not a solution to the issue of large tolerances and loose fit of the OEM pieces. Tolerance stack of the OEM components, Lever, bushing, pivot bolt in both OD, ID and width creat a widely varying fit of the assembly.. Machining a new bushing to any ONE dimension < ID, OD, width, is not likely to work for other levers and pivot bolts.

It's a brake level on a trail bike... it was never designed as a precision fit piece,, more so,, if you make it a precision fit so you have no excess lateral or horizontal movement, the least bit of grit will cause it to bind.

If someone want to do this mod, it is a simple job for a machinist to do right. BUT the machinist will need all three components at the same time in his hands for measurement and fitting.

What I have done to do this job, and what I'd recommend if someone really wants to make the lever a precise fit:

New pivot bolt, then turn the OD to clean up the rough tolerance the OEM part has (I have a new one in my hand, the OD is not concentric to the threaded section and the OD is out of round.)

Make a mandrel for the pivot bolt, hunk of 3/4" cold rolled round stock. Turn the OD enough to clean up and make round... center drill, then tap it m10 x 1.25. Use that mandrel to turn the pivot bolt OD.. That way it is concentric to the threaded shank and the OD is round.

Remove the OEM bushing from the OEM lever, fit a new bushing made from SAE 841, ream with a chucking reamer (not just cut with a boring bar, or a adjustable blade hand reamer) the bushing ID to final dimension with a 0.002" clearance to the cleaned up pivot bolt.

To address lateral clearance.. you can face the lever and bushing on the inside and use shim stock to get the lateral clearance right, or you could add a thrust washer of the correct thickness, so when the pivot bolt shoulder is bottomed out, the clearance is correct.

I removed the bolt from the brake pivot to get a couple of basic dimensions. The O.D. of the bushing is 21mm and the OD of the pivot bolt is 14.90mm. Looking at the available bushings, this seems to be the best match to work from http://www.mcmaster....earings/=mft48c $4.59 each for the standard SAE 841 bushing, the graphite version is $6.60 each.

My pivot pin/bolt was slighty out of round, so the pin needs to be turned slightly and then the bushings machined to match the new pin O.D. Not a big machining job but I think that if someone wants one, I would need to clean up the bolt also. I will order a bushing and machine it on the weekend and let you know how it works... The first one takes some time to get right, the rest are pretty easy. :thumbsup:

Rad...Unless you removed the bushing from the brake lever.. Im pretty sure you are talking about the Inner Dimension of the lever bushing.. Yes?

Second,,, using a standard size available bushing is not going to get the user much improvement unless the current lever bushing and pivot are severely worn.(Rad, I see you are talking about finial sizing the off the shelf bushing to fit... this comment not really pointed at you)

To see significant improvement, the bushing after install (and the ID being undersized at this point) will need to be reamed to final size and clearance for the supplied pivot bolt OD dimension.

Just pressing in an off the shelf bushing really is not a solution to the issue of large tolerances and loose fit of the OEM pieces. Tolerance stack of the OEM components, Lever, bushing, pivot bolt in both OD, ID and width creat a widely varying fit of the assembly.. Machining a new bushing to any ONE dimension < ID, OD, width, is not likely to work for other levers and pivot bolts.

It's a brake level on a trail bike... it was never designed as a precision fit piece,, more so,, if you make it a precision fit so you have no excess lateral or horizontal movement, the least bit of grit will cause it to bind.

If someone want to do this mod, it is a simple job for a machinist to do right. BUT the machinist will need all three components at the same time in his hands for measurement and fitting.

What I have done to do this job, and what I'd recommend if someone really wants to make the lever a precise fit:

New pivot bolt, then turn the OD to clean up the rough tolerance the OEM part has (I have a new one in my hand, the OD is not concentric to the threaded section and the OD is out of round.)

Make a mandrel for the pivot bolt, hunk of 3/4" cold rolled round stock. Turn the OD enough to clean of and make round... center drill, then tap it m10 x 1.25. Use that mandrel to turn the pivot bolt OD.. That way it is concentric to the threaded shank and the OD is round.

Remove the OEM bushing from the OEM lever, fit a new bushing made from SAE 841, ream with a chucking reamer (not just cut with a boring bar, or a adjustable blade hand reamer) the bushing ID to final dimension with a 0.002" clearance to the cleaned up pivot bolt.

To address lateral clearance.. you can face the lever and bushing on the inside and use shim stock to get the lateral clearance right, or you could add a thrust washer of the correct thickness, so when the pivot bolt shoulder is bottomed out, the clearance is correct.

You are certainly correct in that there is no off the shelf solution... Since I probably do not have the proper size reamer, I will machine and finish the pivot bolt to the proper final spec after fitting the new bushing into the arm. Once I have the new bushing to machine, I can press out the old bushing and get better measurements on everything. Last night I just took some basic measurements by removing the bolt but not taking the pedal completely off the bike.

I agree that you can't just send a bushing to someone to improve a loose pedal, all 3 parts must fit together properly as a set.

You are certainly correct in that there is no off the shelf solution... Since I probably do not have the proper size reamer, I will machine and finish the pivot bolt to the proper final spec after fitting the new bushing into the arm. Once I have the new bushing to machine, I can press out the old bushing and get better measurements on everything. Last night I just took some basic measurements by removing the bolt but not taking the pedal completely off the bike.

I agree that you can't just send a bushing to someone to improve a loose pedal, all 3 parts must fit together properly as a set.

Chucking reamers are not that pricey

http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PARTPG=INSRAR2&PMAKA=331-1137&PMPXNO=2614404

and while the HSS import ones will not last a long time when used on steel... but they are dimensionally correct and will do aluminum, brass and other soft metals perfectly.

Rough bore with a boring bar, finish with a chucking reamer. if you can.

[....] to final dimension with a 0.002" clearance to the cleaned up pivot bolt.

Is that 0,05mm or is it a typo?

0.02" i.e. 0,5mm sounds more like it, no?

EDIT: Having second thoughts, 0.05 mm sounds right now....

PS. Thanks for the writeup, who would have guessed that the bolt is out of round to begin with.... Is it not turned?

Edited by e_scourboutis

No sir, not a typo.

I would shoot for no less than 0.002 (.051mm) clearance and allow for up to 0.005 (.127mm) and be happy at 0.003 (.076mm)

Yes the OEM pivot is likely turned on production equipment after being forged, then it is plated.. and as it is not designed as a precision fit piece, to allow for tolerance stack in the several components in the assembly... it is allowed to vary in dimension significantly i'd guess.. The new in a package one I have is about .0015 out of round. Thats pretty small...

NOT a big deal at all in the OEM set up...But if being modified for tighter clearances.. it can be better.

Is that 0,05mm or is it a typo?

0.02" i.e. 0,5mm sounds more like it, no?

EDIT: Having second thoughts, 0.05 mm sounds right now....

PS. Thanks for the writeup, who would have guessed that the bolt is out of round to begin with.... Is it not turned?

No sir, not a typo.

Thanks for the confirmation, I figured it out but the post was allready made! :banghead:

I modified my original pedal and put the after market tip on it. I only have about an 1/8 inch of side to side movement at the tip. The first one was about 3/8 and felt like it could fall off, lol.

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Lessons learned--Something you buy used that is in "great condition" may turn out to be junk.

--Will add lubricating this bushing to my maintenance schedule.

Jesse

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