Video of a few practice lap

Background info:

Female, 01 yz125

First year of serious riding

Very windy day. I would say 20-30 mph gusts.

Prior to my first lesson that day.

There are millions of things for me to work on such as braking more consistently while standing and keeping my leg a little higher and more forward in the corners. Obviously speed will increase

Does anyone have any more tips? Anything helps!

Thanks!

Edited by ctotilas

Just a small observation... your hands seam pretty small... maybe try and adjust your clutch lever (and brake if its the same way) in a little ao you don't have to reach so far for the levers. To each there own but I like being able to put the second part of my finger (no idea what its actually called) on the clutch and brake lever. Gives me a more consistant and controlled feel on both the bars and levers.

Just a small observation... your hands seam pretty small... maybe try and adjust your clutch lever (and brake if its the same way) in a little ao you don't have to reach so far for the levers. To each there own but I like being able to put the second part of my finger (no idea what its actually called) on the clutch and brake lever. Gives me a more consistant and controlled feel on both the bars and levers.

I was actually thinking the same thing watching it. It seems like your levers are way out there. Everyone likes their levers their own way, but if you haven't tried this yet, move them a little closer to the bar and see how you like it. If you have already tried that and did not like it then nevermind.

Other than that, I have to say I am very impressed with your riding for your first year of serious riding!

no expert here.. but your corner speed is the only think im seeing that you should work on. work on the entry speed and then transition back onto the throttle faster. it will help you clear those jumps out of the corners and drastically improve your lap speeds. you can win and lose a race in the corners. thats where you make up the majority of your speed.

pick a corner that you feel comfy on and just push ... push ... push yourself faster into it. the rest will happen. there is a line so be careful not to cross it. but i will say very impressed with the speed you have at your level. good job!

Just a small observation... your hands seam pretty small... maybe try and adjust your clutch lever (and brake if its the same way) in a little ao you don't have to reach so far for the levers. To each there own but I like being able to put the second part of my finger (no idea what its actually called) on the clutch and brake lever. Gives me a more consistant and controlled feel on both the bars and levers.

I was actually thinking the same thing watching it. It seems like your levers are way out there. Everyone likes their levers their own way, but if you haven't tried this yet, move them a little closer to the bar and see how you like it. If you have already tried that and did not like it then nevermind.

Other than that, I have to say I am very impressed with your riding for your first year of serious riding!

no expert here.. but your corner speed is the only think im seeing that you should work on. work on the entry speed and then transition back onto the throttle faster. it will help you clear those jumps out of the corners and drastically improve your lap speeds. you can win and lose a race in the corners. thats where you make up the majority of your speed.

pick a corner that you feel comfy on and just push ... push ... push yourself faster into it. the rest will happen. there is a line so be careful not to cross it. but i will say very impressed with the speed you have at your level. good job!

Thanks everyone! Yes, you are right I think I need to bring my levers in, I have child's hands.. I have been playing with it a little bit and I think I am in agreement.

The only thing I am really really struggling with is dropping into a deep rut. Part of my problem is I know my feet can't touch the ground so it intimidates me since I know I will be "squirrel-y" at first.

I have figured out that I am not lining up correctly paired with not leaning enough to use the rut. I guess time and practice is the only thing that will help.

Thanks everyone! Yes, you are right I think I need to bring my levers in, I have child's hands.. I have been playing with it a little bit and I think I am in agreement.

The only thing I am really really struggling with is dropping into a deep rut. Part of my problem is I know my feet can't touch the ground so it intimidates me since I know I will be "squirrel-y" at first.

I have figured out that I am not lining up correctly paired with not leaning enough to use the rut. I guess time and practice is the only thing that will help.

If you can't touch the ground shave the seat or get the subframe lowered or both. Being comfortable on the bike is key to building your confidence!

Just a small observation... your hands seam pretty small... maybe try and adjust your clutch lever (and brake if its the same way) in a little ao you don't have to reach so far for the levers. To each there own but I like being able to put the second part of my finger (no idea what its actually called) on the clutch and brake lever. Gives me a more consistant and controlled feel on both the bars and levers.

I was actually thinking the same thing watching it. It seems like your levers are way out there. Everyone likes their levers their own way, but if you haven't tried this yet, move them a little closer to the bar and see how you like it. If you have already tried that and did not like it then nevermind.

Other than that, I have to say I am very impressed with your riding for your first year of serious riding!

no expert here.. but your corner speed is the only think im seeing that you should work on. work on the entry speed and then transition back onto the throttle faster. it will help you clear those jumps out of the corners and drastically improve your lap speeds. you can win and lose a race in the corners. thats where you make up the majority of your speed.

pick a corner that you feel comfy on and just push ... push ... push yourself faster into it. the rest will happen. there is a line so be careful not to cross it. but i will say very impressed with the speed you have at your level. good job!

what they said, especially Doshi, corners will cut down more time than jumps do, so work on that the most.

one thing you can do to work on braking while standing is do like 10 warm up laps standing up the whole time, even during corners. It'll also build your stamina along with conditioning yourself to stand up more

edit: i have the same problem as you, about your feet not touching the ground

whats been working for me is, start to lean the bike before you get to the rut but start out at a fraction of your normal speed and little by little go faster and faster

after a while you should feel more comfortable going through ruts and like my man said being comfortable is the key to building confidence

Edited by Kx100Merk

i learned in a dirt wise course that i took of shane watts. a breaking drill on flat ground as you are going back and forth to the track. gas... slide. gas ... slide. gas ....slide... turn then back on the gas ......slide ......turn... but keep doing this back and forth both ways so you feel comfy with the back end coming around. that will help you set up the corners a bit better on the 180's or the stop and go corners. also if you have access to land the circle rut drill is AMAZING on building your confidence. it may seem stupid but OMG you will see major improvements. most "drills" seem silly but they are just that... a drill. its a way for your mind to gain the memory of how to move to get you to stop... go... or turn. its all muscle memory and once you pass that point then you can fine tune it all together. but it never hurts at ANY level to go back to basics!

shane watts maybe more offroad but corners are corners. and i can tell you that if you have a chance to go to any of these schools they are worth every penny spent!

i learned in a dirt wise course that i took of shane watts. a breaking drill on flat ground as you are going back and forth to the track. gas... slide. gas ... slide. gas ....slide... turn then back on the gas ......slide ......turn... but keep doing this back and forth both ways so you feel comfy with the back end coming around. that will help you set up the corners a bit better on the 180's or the stop and go corners. also if you have access to land the circle rut drill is AMAZING on building your confidence. it may seem stupid but OMG you will see major improvements. most "drills" seem silly but they are just that... a drill. its a way for your mind to gain the memory of how to move to get you to stop... go... or turn. its all muscle memory and once you pass that point then you can fine tune it all together. but it never hurts at ANY level to go back to basics!

shane watts maybe more offroad but corners are corners. and i can tell you that if you have a chance to go to any of these schools they are worth every penny spent!

Awesome advice and videos! Thank you so much!

what they said, especially Doshi, corners will cut down more time than jumps do, so work on that the most.

one thing you can do to work on braking while standing is do like 10 warm up laps standing up the whole time, even during corners. It'll also build your stamina along with conditioning yourself to stand up more

edit: i have the same problem as you, about your feet not touching the ground

whats been working for me is, start to lean the bike before you get to the rut but start out at a fraction of your normal speed and little by little go faster and faster

after a while you should feel more comfortable going through ruts and like my man said being comfortable is the key to building confidence

I still can't touch with cutting the seat. 5'3 on 125. I cut it a little too much causing me to slide backwards on the seat when I don't intend to. This is also part of my corner problem as I can not stay forward. I am much more comfortable on the straight seat. The cut seat was good to start. I will just have to accept I am going to fall a lot learning. But once I've got it. I've got it.

If you can't touch the ground shave the seat or get the subframe lowered or both. Being comfortable on the bike is key to building your confidence!

I know the post is a lil' old, but i'm gonna throw my 2 cents into the pot.

Firstly: your way through the jumps seems pretty good. If you can't seem to get comfortable on a certain obstacle go through it a few times, you'll learn the best route through it a lot more quickly. You seem pretty fast though.

if your not comfortable on your bike, your not going to be able to do much. Try a few different bar heights, and since your short, you'll probably like something low, almost flat bar low. The lower bars will give you a better feel, and make the bike easier for you to control even with your shorter height. Try and find someone who will cut and re wield your subframe. Comfort is key in our sport.

If you don't already, stand on the balls of your feet. When i race, my feet are everywhere. I've been known to hit jumps on my heels, and readjust my footing in the air. Note: if you try that, do a no-footer, as that'll ensure you don't hook your feet up on your shifter.

Standing on the balls of your feet helps in corners because you won't have to worry about your foot getting ripped off by the ruts.

Make sure your suspension is set up for you. Comfort is key in our sport. Did i already say that?

Lastly, ride. Ride. Ride. And ride some more. The more seat time on your bike the better your results.

Looks pretty good to me... just keep riding and progressing. Seat time is the only cure!

First year? Don't worry too much about getting fast , fast. Speed will come.

I can't tell from this video. but one thing that is kind of important, but rarely discussed - ELBOWS OUT and UP. Do NOT tuck your elbows in. When they are out and up, your body naturally wants to sit further forward, corners are easier, and you actually will gain better control of the bike. I have no doubt you'd find lever and bar adjustments being needed if you're not currently riding elbows out, but that's ok!

SEAT TIME is invaluable.

Right now, "F" the jumping out of corners and worrying about that. Being comfortable on a bike that is dancing is more important. Getting the techniques used to correct a bike that is not doing what you want is MUCH more important than worrying about corner speed or jumping right now. Elbows out and up is one of those techniques. If you try to go fast without the experience on how to fix things, that is when injuries result. Example - you ride elbows down, but you have decent corner speed. First time you jump a berm, or hit a square edge, you are going over. You have no ability to absorb that impact!

i don't know your exact skill level and ability, so I'm just personally trying to bring in what I consider basic stuff.

Edited by DethWshBkr_

I know the post is a lil' old, but i'm gonna throw my 2 cents into the pot.

Firstly: your way through the jumps seems pretty good. If you can't seem to get comfortable on a certain obstacle go through it a few times, you'll learn the best route through it a lot more quickly. You seem pretty fast though.

if your not comfortable on your bike, your not going to be able to do much. Try a few different bar heights, and since your short, you'll probably like something low, almost flat bar low. The lower bars will give you a better feel, and make the bike easier for you to control even with your shorter height. Try and find someone who will cut and re wield your subframe. Comfort is key in our sport.

If you don't already, stand on the balls of your feet. When i race, my feet are everywhere. I've been known to hit jumps on my heels, and readjust my footing in the air. Note: if you try that, do a no-footer, as that'll ensure you don't hook your feet up on your shifter.

Standing on the balls of your feet helps in corners because you won't have to worry about your foot getting ripped off by the ruts.

Make sure your suspension is set up for you. Comfort is key in our sport. Did i already say that?

Lastly, ride. Ride. Ride. And ride some more. The more seat time on your bike the better your results.

Comfort is key definitely. I am having a slow time practicing sharp cornered ruts. Especially since I can't plant my foot. I was really moving along good on the 150sx until a race last weekend. Someone slammed into me in the stinkin' beginner class. broke both the radius and ulna :( Thank you for your advice and support!

Looks pretty good to me... just keep riding and progressing. Seat time is the only cure!

After I start healing! Thank you!

First year? Don't worry too much about getting fast , fast. Speed will come.

I can't tell from this video. but one thing that is kind of important, but rarely discussed - ELBOWS OUT and UP. Do NOT tuck your elbows in. When they are out and up, your body naturally wants to sit further forward, corners are easier, and you actually will gain better control of the bike. I have no doubt you'd find lever and bar adjustments being needed if you're not currently riding elbows out, but that's ok!

SEAT TIME is invaluable.

Right now, "F" the jumping out of corners and worrying about that. Being comfortable on a bike that is dancing is more important. Getting the techniques used to correct a bike that is not doing what you want is MUCH more important than worrying about corner speed or jumping right now. Elbows out and up is one of those techniques. If you try to go fast without the experience on how to fix things, that is when injuries result. Example - you ride elbows down, but you have decent corner speed. First time you jump a berm, or hit a square edge, you are going over. You have no ability to absorb that impact!

i don't know your exact skill level and ability, so I'm just personally trying to bring in what I consider basic stuff.

That was awesome advice. I started hitting the corners a lot better, more consistently for a better term. I am still having a hard time in the rough chop. But that again, seat time body positions and corrections, Thank you!!

your lines are bad. Your not using the space on the track you kinda just sit in the middle of the course.

I got lots of time with this do to road racing cars.

slow in is fast out.

If you are takin a left hand turn approach the turn all the to the right on the edge of the track, turn in hit the apex and swing out to the right.

The idea is to not turn as sharp the more of a straight line you can take the faster the bike will go.

and wow that track sucks!!

Edited by limp1969

your lines are bad. Your not using the space on the track you kinda just sit in the middle of the course.

I got lots of time with this do to road racing cars.

slow in is fast out.

If you are takin a left hand turn approach the turn all the to the right on the edge of the track, turn in hit the apex and swing out to the right.

The idea is to not turn as sharp the more of a straight line you can take the faster the bike will go.

and wow that track sucks!!

What's wrong with the track?

What's wrong with the track?

Mr. Negativity???

Nothing positive to say towards a BRAND NEW track rider... that should get the self esteem up in no time! :rolleyes:

Mr. Negativity???

Nothing positive to say towards a BRAND NEW track rider... that should get the self esteem up in no time! :rolleyes:

LOL, I was thinking the same thing...

Plus 3 palms is an AMAZING MX facilty in good ole Houston, Tx! IMO :)

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