Trail Tech X2 Modified for Hella Projector Low Beam

Ive had a crazy looking homebrew light on my S which was a combination of my own mad genious and a friend's reject GS650 fairing. The light incorporated 2 Hella light modules, one high beam and one projector with clipped beam for low beam. I had them set up with 55w HID, and wired so that I could have them both on at the same time. The light output from the two of them was like daytime conditions. I cannot imagine better performance from a headlight. The problem with the setup is that it looked as home made as it was...

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So I wanted something a little (a lot) cooler looking, I decided I really liked the look of the Trail Tech X2, so I got one. (I got two actually, but I sent one back). I originally intended to put an HID bulb in the projector beam of the dual-sport X2 but after all the reading I did (while waiting for it to arrive) I learned that it is not possible to fit an HID bulb into that Projector lens due to the length of the HID vs the length of the Halogen H4? That it comes with. The story is a bit convoluted and complicated but the end result of all this is that I ended up with an Off-Road Halogen X2 and was not satisfied with the performance on-road and felt that even though just a few people flashed their brights at me when riding high-beam, probably everyone was annoyed and just didn't feel like being a jerk about it.

Soooo... I measured the X2 and found that the supposed 4" light was poking through a 90mm hole, which coincidentally is the exact diameter of my Hella Modules :ride: .

So I took it apart and started modifying it to fit :)

The Hella Module needed to be trilled a little bit at the top to get it to fit beneath the High-Beam of the X2.

bth_IMG_3395.jpg bth_IMG_3396.jpg

And some spacers and washers needed to be added between the module and the screw holes used to hold in the X2 Low beam. (The screw holes lined up almost perfectly!!! No modification was needed to move them in order to center the module exactly)

IMG_3397.jpg IMG_3399.jpg bth_IMG_3421.jpg?t=1366622817IMG_3400.jpg

It looked great, so I felt safe getting a little more agressive with modifying the X2... The Black plastic backing on the X2 that makes it "Fully Self Contained" needed to be modified to allow the module to fit. The backing is necessary because the white plastic fairing is sandwiched between the black light housing and the black backing. Without the backing the light housing just falls out. (Ive seen others fab their own aluminum backing, and I would have if this didnt work so well.

IMG_3402.jpg IMG_3405.jpgIMG_3407.jpg IMG_3406.jpg IMG_3408.jpg

As you can see, the projector is quite a bit larger than the previously self-containing plastic backing, and thats without an HID bulb sticking out another 1.5" or so... The light was looking amazing.


Will Post the 2nd Half of the install in a different post, TT wont let me put up more pictures here...

Edited by OpieDP

Excellent, this can really help some out, looks great.

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