Most common breakdowns out on the trail

I was reading Krannies post on "What's in your pack" and it got me thinking about what are the most common problems people face. Hopefully we can pack a tool kit that can fix most anything and get us back to the truck, but I would be interested to see what issues people experience the most? Is it flats, chains, levers, cables, etc?

Maybe a top-ten list of breakdowns out on the trail.

I haven't had my bike very long and I have been lucky, but here is mine:

  • flat rear tire, nail (I was only about a mile from the truck, so I just limped it back)
  • bent handlebars (they were really jacked up, but I rode the last 10 miles back, aimed at 10 o-clock)
  • broken front brake lever (just used the back brake for the rest of the ride)

Only out right break down I've had in four years is a flat rear tire. Like you, I limped back a couple miles.

I've dumped the bikes a couple of times and crushed the radiators in a bit, but no leaks so far.

Started to overheat one time and just stopped for a bit.

Jim.

broken front brake lever (just used the back brake for the rest of the ride)

Tip on that: put some teflon tape under your perches and snug them up just enough that you can bump them around the bar with a decent hit of your hand.

Next time you wack one it will just slide around the bar.

Jim.

Edited by JimDettman

My most common part failures are:

1. knees

2. fingers

3. knees again

4. collar bone

5. shoulder dislocate

6. knee again

7. hip

8. pinch flats (no more, with Tubliss)

9. central nervous system

10 clogged pilot jet

Edited by Krannie

Tires are #1

I have fixed at least 4 CRF450x clutch covers on the trail.

Aside from that tweaked perches and broken levers.

And sandy vaginas.....no wait that's the CA section.......

I have fixed at least 4 CRF450x clutch covers on the trail.

So has everyone figured out that it's a good idea to file off a couple of teeth on the inside of the rear brake pedal yet? :smirk:

Jim.

And sandy vaginas.....no wait that's the CA section.......

Is there an OEM Honda douche that helps with this??? Like a Red label racing douche?? Or does one need to be sponsored by Massengil??

Is there an OEM Honda douche that helps with this??? Like a Red Bar Racing douche?? Or does one need to be sponsored by Massengil??

You are gonna have to ask one of the regulars........

You are gonna have to ask one of the regulars........

Nice... :p

I see a marketing opportunity...

Nice... :p

I see a marketing opportunity...

Two words....

Hard Anodizing.

Gear lever.

My friend's KTM is the most common breakdown I encounter on my rides.

Let's see....on the 450X it was pinch flats, broken rear hub, roached stators, cracked pistons, finally ate 3rd and 5th gears. But in fairness it had a bazillion hours on it and dozens of races so overall was a very, very relaible machine. I screwed it up with too many "mods" and have since learned to stay as close to OEM as possible.

On the 450R is was a seized crank. That bike, "the animal" is still going strong after a complete rebuild with a new owner who equally "animal".

The 300XC-W was pinch flats and seized pistons...too numerous to count so it's adios.

On the YZ 250 it's blown out shocks, forks, cracked frame....bent stuff "02 model but the motor is realiable as an anvil. I've got another pinger itch these days.....uh oh...

On the 530....counter shaft seals and things wear out and fall off or out like swingarm bearings....this is a relaible Halloweeen bike that get flogged to within an inch of its life about every ride.

On the 650R the weakness is clutch but it's never failed me on the trail. The older I get the more I like this machine.

They are all junk just some worse than others. In my later later years I'm trending towards Japanese and close to all OEM...but hey...it's all good.

Edited by cubera

For me its flats.

Broke and bent lots of handlebars. I highsided a KTM in a field once and sheared my bar clean off when it planted into The ground and bike kept going.

Had a few chain jumps. One time 3 miles out it punched up and broke the ignition cover.

Usually just minor stuff.

and close to all OEM...but hey...it's all good.

On that, it always amazes me how so many buy a bike and then right away try to turn it into something else.

Jim.

Good stuff guys. A couple questions:

Is the 21" tube so that you can use it on either the front or rear if you get a flat?

As anyone ever had a problem with the clutch cover getting punctured AFTER they have filed down the inner teeth and wrapped some tubing on the brake pedal?

Good stuff guys. A couple questions:

Is the 21" tube so that you can use it on either the front or rear if you get a flat?

As anyone ever had a problem with the clutch cover getting punctured AFTER they have filed down the inner teeth and wrapped some tubing on the brake pedal?

Yes and yes.

The clutch cover is magnesium, so it punctures like wet newspaper...

Some safety wire wrap the pedal edge with a piece of old tire sidewall, for extra protection.

Yes and yes.

The clutch cover is magnesium, so it punctures like wet newspaper...

Some safety wire wrap the pedal edge with a piece of old tire sidewall, for extra protection.

Certainly is a common problem (and not just with CRF's), which is why many carry JB Weld in their pack.

Rick Ramsey did a nice setup to protect his:

http://www.rickramsey.net/CRF250Xmymods.htm#clutchcoverprot

Jim.

Good stuff guys. A couple questions:

Is the 21" tube so that you can use it on either the front or rear if you get a flat?

As anyone ever had a problem with the clutch cover getting punctured AFTER they have filed down the inner teeth and wrapped some tubing on the brake pedal?

Yes.

You should also lower the pedal as far as you can with the adjuster.

Even with all that I have seen covers get jacked.

For me it's been front tire flats here in southern AZ. I have had front tire flats 3 times and road it back over 30 miles each time. The trick is, the faster you go, the less you notice, no bent rims either. Also clogged pilot jet.

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