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Most common breakdowns out on the trail

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AZ rocks are extreme everywhere just about. I know Yuma had its fair share of turtle, baby, black, and white heads to pinch flat a bunch and the rocks are worse up here in the Sedona area.....I've had the best success with Bridgestone UHD tubes at about 12-13 psi front and rear...flats are rare with these tubes at those pressures but I don't have a round rim on any bike.... :devil::lol::foul: Believe it or not I seem to pinch flat more often with higher tire pressures.....

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...I've had the best success with Bridgestone UHD tubes at about 12-13 psi front and rear...flats are rare with these tubes at those pressures but I don't have a round rim on any bike.... :devil::lol::foul: Believe it or not I seem to pinch flat more often with higher tire pressures.....

That's funny that you mention that tube because after like 4 flats with generic tubes I spent the $40 shipped for that tube, hoping it was the god send. I hit a rock going 20mph, running 15 psi, and the tube Split open, 1" long! I was pissed! No amount of slim helped on that one. I put a huge patch on it, but the slim eats away at the patch glue and it eventually comes off after a month.

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That's funny that you mention that tube because after like 4 flats with generic tubes I spent the $40 shipped for that tube, hoping it was the god send. I hit a rock going 20mph, running 15 psi, and the tube Split open, 1" long! I was pissed! No amount of slim helped on that one. I put a huge patch on it, but the slim eats away at the patch glue and it eventually comes off after a month.

That's amazing! I've run the UHD 4mm natural rubber tubes Bridgestone or Michelin and found them more reliable then bib mousse, tire balls, or TuBliss. I rarely use Slime sans an old tube for peace of mind. Over the last several years I've had one front flat racing (out of maybe 70 races) and one problem melting a front tube running long washes at low pressures and high speeds in temps over 100F....I'll do 10 psi front and rear on the 530 for racing and 12-13psi front and rear for riding the Coconino/Prescott rock trails.

If you're having problems with the UHD like that there is something else going on like a bad rim band, rim lock, tire wall, sharp spoke nipple, installation problem, etc. You should not be paying more than $22 delivered for these tubes. I'll reuse them a couple of times generally but always start with fresh/new tubes and tires before every important ride like Baja or a long race. I also use Motion Pro rim bands and locks whenever possible. I do al my own rim, hub, spoke and tire work these days for the most part because of the struggles I've had with shattered hubs, broken spokes, and bent rims. I don't own a round rim still but they'll hold a bead and not vibrate my fillings out on the trail.

Bring me a rim and I'll set it up for you for free and if you can pinch it at 10psi I'll fix it for you on the trail and buy you lunch. :thumbsup:

Edited by cubera
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Fitting the Tubliss cured my pinch flat issues , now I can run around 8 psi and have better grip .

I loved TuBliss when I ran them until they started to reliably fail to hold air. The inner tube and carcass gets beat to death if it has to be ridden flat rendering the entire system useless. That's why I don't use them anymore. This is largely operator/user abuse generated nothing against TuBliss. Rims need to be a little straighter than mine are also :devil::ride:

Yep...the Bridgestone UHD are $34....my bad. I didn't realize they've gone up so much in price. But now CRF Doc turned us on the the STI UHD tubes for half that price so I'm going to stock up on a few of those.

Edited by cubera

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We have been running the Bridgestone UHD tubes for years with great results...recently the prices on them skyrocketed.

We have since switched to a new brand at a much better price. They have performed as good or better than the pricey Bridgestones for half the price.

STI Ultra Heavy Duty...4mm thick, excellent stem mount, etc.

We have been using them for months in all conditions including National Hare and Hounds and the Barstow 200...Barstow is hell on tires and tubes and they are like new.

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If you are pinch flatting with a UHD Bridgestone tube, you need to look at a different front tire with a stiff carcass. Most MX front tires are way too flimsy for trail use.

I have had the best luck with 15 psi front and rear.

Cubera mentioned rattling fillings..... If you guys have not started doing this allready, you should strongly consider balancing your wheels. It makes a huge difference you can feel, plus gives you a couple extra mph at full speed.

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All good CRF Doc and DD! I'm going to check out the tubes you mentioned.

And narf_44 I buy my tubes at RMATV/MC mostly and maybe I'm off a bit on the prices :banghead: But at $40 a tube you might as well be installing a new bib at every tire change. :ride:

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so for those of you that have punctured a case (ign or clutch side) does JB Weld actually work? How long before you start to ride again after application? Will JB (or other products) actually stick to magnesium?

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Sticks to Mag great.

Scuffing the surface and cleaning it with some solvent helps adhesion.

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All good CRF Doc and DD! I'm going to check out the tubes you mentioned.

And narf_44 I buy my tubes at RMATV/MC mostly and maybe I'm off a bit on the prices :banghead: But at $40 a tube you might as well be installing a new bib at every tire change. :ride:

At $125-140 for a bib I think $40 is a bargan. I recall getting good thick tubes not to long ago for $20-25.

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Are you using the JB weld steel stick or do you carry the mix together?

How about carrying spare levers and clutch perch. I am running Cycra Probends with the large handguard. Never broke a lever on a bike with guards but I still carry levers and clutch perch. Should I leave them in the truck?

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. Should I leave them in the truck?

The law of averages means says that anything you take put of your pack and put back into the truck will be needed on the next ride or two ------- if your never more than a solid Sierra Clubber day hike from the truck like me, just carry a CO2 pump, apocket knife, some safety wire, and a dog-eared 13 year old copy of Penthouse --- this will ensure you never have a breakdown (as long as it was never in the pack to start with that is)

Edited by DMC707

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Are you using the JB weld steel stick or do you carry the mix together?

How about carrying spare levers and clutch perch. I am running Cycra Probends with the large handguard. Never broke a lever on a bike with guards but I still carry levers and clutch perch. Should I leave them in the truck?

5 minute JB weld in the tubes. Put it in a thick ziplock with alcohol prep pads and some emery cloth.

If you have good handguards, the lever and the perch is a tad overkill IMO (unless you are going onan unsupported multi day trip). Not carrying them is your call.

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Never broke a lever on a bike with guards but I still carry levers and clutch perch. Should I leave them in the truck?

Put some teflon tape under the perch around the bar and snug them just enough that a hard hit with your hand will bump them around the bar.

They will stay in place for normal use, but spin when they take a hit.

If you break one after that, you are extremely unlucky and shouldn't be ridding bikes in the first place LOL.

Jim.

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Im a JB weld fan, I am also a professional real welder but that didnt stop me from using some JB about a month ago. I made a real dumbass out of myself when replacing the starter clutch and reduction gear on my bike. I went to go replace the RH side case cover, not just the clutch cover, and as I was fitting it up I forgot/didnt realize that the waterpump shaft is keyed. When this key is not alligned and you give it a swift pop with your fist it cracks the outer case cover right under the watepump just above the weep hole. Good lord I about barfed. I removed it, cleaned it with brake clean and a air hose, scuffed with scotch brite and SS wire brush, heated case with heat gun, mixed JB and applied. The heat seemed to soften the JB and make it easy to work into the crack, then it kicked off and got really hard. The case have was backordered so I rode the bike like this for almost a month. Not a drop of leaking and no water in the tranny.

I carry a stick in my pack for sure, mostly to slow down or stock a cracked something from preventing me from getting to my truck. I think as you ride more you figure out what you need to carry for your riding style and area. I personally have not had any breakdowns on the trail yet, but I also prep the bike good. Last Wednesday I did loose a header nut and the other got loose. This caused the bike to run like shit but It made it back to the truck since we were done riding anyway. I replaced those nuts with a metal locking nut.

Edited by Maverick26
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when the oil comes out the sump plug because 'someone' didnt do it up, and you overhead and crack the camshaft housing, twist the camshaft, valves hit the piston, destroy the camshaft bearings, well thats the only break down i have had haha, and it runs better then ever

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Hmmm... my most common breakdowns.... seem to be other's bikes. ;) (usually orange in color).

BUT, I do a lot of maintenance on my bike. Proactive maintenance. Like, replacing the chain every 1000 miles. Even though I carry a chain breaker, master links, and section of chain. I feel most of the repairs I've done on the trail, are from a fall or lack of initial maintenance. Most people will wait trying to save a bike, and do the reactive maintenance, which is usually more expensive as it has potential to break more items when things go bad.

The common (for me, or my amigos);

- tires/tubes

- electrical (connections or rubbed off insulation)

- foot shift lever

- foot brake lever

- spokes

EDIT: I also need to add, most of my trail buddies... follow a similar regime as myself. Using same tire/tube combo...etc.etc. So, we're pretty limited to "breakdowns" or problems. In fact, I prep a couple of the bikes in the group... and, thankfully... they are without problems on the trail(s).

Edited by JohnnyAirtime
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