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ram 2500 ball joints

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Mine were replaced at 29k on my 2010 cummins. I pull a 10k lb toy hauler about 5k miles per year. Ball joints in my 2006 F250 powerstroke lasted ~120k. Wheel bearings are the weak link in the fords.

Edited by ph363

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i have to agree. 99% of the people wouldnt grease anything even if there were zerks. chances are they dont even know what a zerk is...

I have a 2010 RAM 2500 diesel, not a single zerk on the entire truck.

Edited by toyota_mdt_tech

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if it doesnt have big tires and never plowed snow, they should of lasted hell of a lot longer than 37k. maybe dodge axle is a bad design ? or that dude hit every pot hole in town 1000 times

My mechanic warned me about anything dodge made except the cummins. Cept they dont make that, along with all the running gear now do they? Dodge front ends are known to be the worst.

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well it gets worse for my buddy, now the dash needs to come out cause the exaporator core is cracked and leaking, also it has 4 broken exhaust manifold bolts in the head. he is now calling chrysler customer service. not even 40k on it

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Normally I don't comment, but in this case I will. I designed ball joints for 20 years for the so called big 3, I worked for a supplier company. At one point, I did designs for every truck out there. We did not always win the business due to cost, but the competition usually just copied my design. A couple of things to note. Ball joints are typically the last thing thought about in suspension design, so we get minimal space, which means the ball joint is undersized for its application. I can't tell you how many times the ball was undersized for the load conditions. Just about all ball joints use a polymer bearing for low friction, which is good, but when it is undersizes it means it will wear out sooner. Another issue with lack of space is it is impossible to design a proper seal. With poor seal design, you cannot keep the environment out which means a pre-mature wearout. Grease fittings will help if used. We did studies where ball joints were intentionally contaminated and those not purges destroyed themselves in short order and those that were purged lasted quite a long time. The reason Moog joints usually last a long time, is that most of them still use a steel bearing design along with a grease fitting. Only issue is some modern steering systems don't work well with the increased friction. Another issue is that many companies are now sourcing ball joints offshore to find the lowest price. Here the problem is, they use low quality polymers for the bearings and the seals are typically poorly designed and again use poor materials that don't last. I could write a book on this subject, but it would probably bore everyone to death. Hope this answers a few questions about ball joints.

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I run a Dodge dealership. They are poor design, we se them frequently. They don't even come with grease zerks. God only knows why they did that... esp on an HD

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The funny thing is if you could take all the GOOD things about the "big 3" trucks (dodge, ford, chevy) you could actually have one DECENT truck. But they all fail in certain areas, and some are a little better than the others in certain areas.

I work in a diesel shop and we work on the big 3, and also semis, but more dodges than anything because there just seem to be more of them around here and the boss knows them inside and out so people know if they have a dodge hes one of the best around. Iv lost track of how many ball joints iv replaced on dodges. only done maybe one ford and chevy, but we just dont work on them as much. We seem to replace the joints in the dodges with the AAM axles more than anything. I think around 2002-ish they switched from DANA axles to AAM axles (American Axle Manufactures). The chevys also run AAM axles in the rear, cant remember if ford uses AAM axles or not? Replaced more joints in 03-09 dodges more than anything, never done them in an 2010+ dodge but I think the front axle is still pretty much the same as the pre 10 trucks.

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Not boring to me. Enjoyed the read. Thanks for your input too. ;D

Thanks for the support. To be honest I actually have started a book, it probably will deal more with the politics of the business, but I have been trying to put some techinical details in it. So maybe I can count you as a future reader? With you and a few family and friends, I might be able to sell 23 copies! haha.

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Normally I don't comment, but in this case I will. I designed ball joints for 20 years for the so called big 3, I worked for a supplier company. At one point, I did designs for every truck out there. We did not always win the business due to cost, but the competition usually just copied my design. A couple of things to note. Ball joints are typically the last thing thought about in suspension design, so we get minimal space, which means the ball joint is undersized for its application. I can't tell you how many times the ball was undersized for the load conditions. Just about all ball joints use a polymer bearing for low friction, which is good, but when it is undersizes it means it will wear out sooner. Another issue with lack of space is it is impossible to design a proper seal. With poor seal design, you cannot keep the environment out which means a pre-mature wearout. Grease fittings will help if used. We did studies where ball joints were intentionally contaminated and those not purges destroyed themselves in short order and those that were purged lasted quite a long time. The reason Moog joints usually last a long time, is that most of them still use a steel bearing design along with a grease fitting. Only issue is some modern steering systems don't work well with the increased friction. Another issue is that many companies are now sourcing ball joints offshore to find the lowest price. Here the problem is, they use low quality polymers for the bearings and the seals are typically poorly designed and again use poor materials that don't last. I could write a book on this subject, but it would probably bore everyone to death. Hope this answers a few questions about ball joints.

I can't tell you how many customers I had ranting at me that their ball joints were shot at 20k miles (even though it's under warranty, it's time without their truck).

I'd always listen, nod my head, and explain that while it's putting beer on my table to replace these poorly constructed components, I'm as irritated as you are.

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I can't tell you how many customers I had ranting at me that their ball joints were shot at 20k miles (even though it's under warranty, it's time without their truck).

I'd always listen, nod my head, and explain that while it's putting beer on my table to replace these poorly constructed components, I'm as irritated as you are.

I hear you brother. I spent time at dealerships and got my ass chewed from customers and mechanics alike for the poor designs. All I could say is, when trying to put 10 lbs into a 4 lb package, somethings not going to work. More history on the subject, most vehicles required new designs for each vehicle update, usually with less packaging space than the previous design. Also as we found out about the deficiencies in the previous designs and would correct them, we had to start all over again. As part of my job, I use to benchmark the competition. One thing that I noted about the Japanese was that they used the same ball joint across many platforms and various model years. As opposed to designing a new ball joint for every model and year, they found one that had good performance and reliability and replicated it across the lineup. Sometimes the joint was actually larger than the vehicle needed, but it provided an increased level of safety factor. But the Japanese use a different business model than the Americans which allowed for the supplier to make money and the OE to reduce warranty costs. Just another chapter in the world of ball joints and the auto industry.

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well the dealer stepped up this time and warranted the evaporator core and the exhaust manifold bolts. charged him a 300 dollar co pay. so he is alittle happier now. in shure that evap core alone was almost 300 bucks

you guys in the dealers..... he dosent mind replacing the ball joints in it once in a while. but are the trannys holding up on these? its a 5.7 and he dosent tow with it.

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