2 stroke braking?

Been having some trouble slowing down.... er safely, from high speed. With brembos on the husky 2t it's so easy to lock up the front but with no engine braking to stabalize should i be using mostly thre rears???

I like 50/50 front and rear.

If your front brakes keep locking up then use a little more rear but still enough front just so it doesn't lock up.

Yeah. Ask Gary Semics. I think he says that the braking should be mostly rear and you just make up the difference with the front brake. Try to brake with the rear 100% and then just add the front brake as much as you need to. However, I do drag the front brake going through certain turns. I even sometimes drag the rear brake across some off-camnbers when traction is limited. 250 2 strokes have a lot of wheelspin sometimes lol.

Edited by dirtjumpordie

Because of weight transfer to the front wheel while braking the front will provide the most stopping power before lockup, the rear will easily lockup, so you really need to use the front for max stopping power. Some aftermarket high performance brake pads are very grabby and easy to lockup so maybe go back to stock brake pads, I've had to do that on rear brakes for two of my bikes.

Work on controlling the brakes. The better you can use them the faster you can go. So start practicing, get a feel for how much you can pull in before it locks up and make sure you take notice. Takes practice.

I use my rear to slow down and just drag the front brake to keep the front planted in a rut and keep it where I want it.

Also staying off the clutch seems to help keep the rear from locking up and the need is not there to use so much of the front brake. Works for me. I dropped almost 3 full seconds off my lap times just by not using the clutch when braking. One of the local pros noticed how lightly I was hitting the rear brake and the wheel was locking up. He said that is a big no no if I ever wanted to get faster, he told me that the only thing I should be using the clutch for is on the start, and to build rpm's. My corner speed improved more than I ever could have imagined. It really helps slow the 2 stroke down since the engine braking is nearly non existent.

I use my rear to slow down and just drag the front brake to keep the front planted in a rut and keep it where I want it.

Also staying off the clutch seems to help keep the rear from locking up and the need is not there to use so much of the front brake. Works for me. I dropped almost 3 full seconds off my lap times just by not using the clutch when braking. One of the local pros noticed how lightly I was hitting the rear brake and the wheel was locking up. He said that is a big no no if I ever wanted to get faster, he told me that the only thing I should be using the clutch for is on the start, and to build rpm's. My corner speed improved more than I ever could have imagined. It really helps slow the 2 stroke down since the engine braking is nearly non existent.

Funny how you mentioned to not use the clutch as much. I swear some people made fun of me when I was saying that in a different thread. Best use is to get the bike going then just remove it and practice without it. Clutch is just there for starts

I drag my rear brake a lot to help control the bike how I want, often without the clutch in, just don't get to crazy or you will stall it (I run the rear brake lever real low or I find myself over using it), add in the front when need to get abrupt and always try to avoid front lockup but don't really have a issue with that myself.

Most everyone else had some really good tips on what they do as well.

Funny how you mentioned to not use the clutch as much. I swear some people made fun of me when I was saying that in a different thread. Best use is to get the bike going then just remove it and practice without it. Clutch is just there for starts

The clutch is vital in every aspect of riding. It is how you should be controlling the power delivery. If your not using the clutch at all then there is no possible way that you are on the gas long enough, braking hard enough, and getting up to speed quick enough. Its just not possible.

All I was saying is that you don't need to use the clutch to slow down.

Edited by BDubb106

I don't slam on the front brake, I gradually add more, I usually slam on the rear first, but for the rear, I don't pull in the clutch(heavy flywheel helps) but sometimes I have to feather a bit from stalling, but if I do, I usually have enough momentum to bump start it back up.

Like others have said, do the majority with the rear, make up the difference with the front

When you're slowing down for a corner, weight transfers to the front wheel - a lot of weight. On a car, about 80% of your braking is on the front, and it's not much different on a dirtbike. On a long fire road or something, get up a little in the speed there, and try braking only with your front, and then only with your rear (don't pull in the clutch!). You'll see the difference. One of the local pros in my area learned to master his front brake when his dad pulled off his rear brake and had him ride around the track for a while (eesh, no thanks!).

Like others have said, do the majority with the rear, make up the difference with the front

It's the opposite actually. Majority with the front, make up the difference with the rear. A good drill to prove this is find a nice level area that's grass or dirt etc. Get up to say 30-40 mph and brake as hard as you can with just the front, then do the same thing with just the rear, then do it with both brakes. It will be quite obvious what stops you fastest. Just the rear is by far and away the LEAST braking force you can generate. Front only is better, but both in tandem is definitely best.

The front will always give you the most braking power, weight transfer has a lot to do with that. However, front only will cause too much front end dive. Using the rear as well lessens that dive and keeps the bike more planted and stable when braking.

Your bike has two brakes for a reason. Learn how to use BOTH of them properly, and you're braking will improve dramatically.

Been having some trouble slowing down.... er safely, from high speed. With brembos on the husky 2t it's so easy to lock up the front but with no engine braking to stabalize should i be using mostly thre rears???

In reality, you are LUCKY to have front brakes good enough to actually lock up. I also say get used to them...Practice with them a lot. I personally use the front brake HARD but of course, when the bike is straight up or very close to it. Maybe I got used to it when I had bikes with lousy brakes in general. You HAD to use the front to slow down in a race setting. I always use them now, even in a DS ride. It really is part of your racecraft.

It's the opposite actually. Majority with the front, make up the difference with the rear. A good drill to prove this is find a nice level area that's grass or dirt etc. Get up to say 30-40 mph and brake as hard as you can with just the front, then do the same thing with just the rear, then do it with both brakes. It will be quite obvious what stops you fastest. Just the rear is by far and away the LEAST braking force you can generate. Front only is better, but both in tandem is definitely best.

The front will always give you the most braking power, weight transfer has a lot to do with that. However, front only will cause too much front end dive. Using the rear as well lessens that dive and keeps the bike more planted and stable when braking.

Your bike has two brakes for a reason. Learn how to use BOTH of them properly, and you're braking will improve dramatically.

Welp, I'm not braking on nice level ground and I'm not looking to come to a nice gradual, controlled stop. Grab a handful of front brake at speed and see what happens. Plus, I'm always covering the rear brake to keep the ass end from spiking on me in whoops, chop, rocks ect. These bikes aren't 4T's. they're meant to be backed into corners and steered with the rear wheel

Maybe we have 2 different riding styles but myself and pretty much every fast guy I know, looses their rear brake for a little bit at some point during an offroad race. Like I said, I only use my front brake to make up the difference or get my front wheel to bite for traction when I need it to. Yes your right, front brakes provide more stopping power in a perfect setting, but not the right kind of stopping power in a practical setting. End of story.

Welp, I'm not braking on nice level ground and I'm not looking to come to a nice gradual, controlled stop. Grab a handful of front brake at speed and see what happens. Plus, I'm always covering the rear brake to keep the ass end from spiking on me in whoops, chop, rocks ect. These bikes aren't 4T's. they're meant to be backed into corners and steered with the rear wheel

Maybe we have 2 different riding styles but myself and pretty much every fast guy I know, looses their rear brake for a little bit at some point during an offroad race. Like I said, I only use my front brake to make up the difference or get my front wheel to bite for traction when I need it to. Yes your right, front brakes provide more stopping power in a perfect setting, but not the right kind of stopping power in a practical setting. End of story.

The level ground thing was a controlled environment to prove a point, one you've apparently missed. I grab a handful of front brake at speed all the time, but I don't just slam it on and lock it up. It's not an on/off switch. I can't even fathom trying to stop quickly at speed with just the rear and little to no front, not gonna happen. And your so-called 'fast guys' can't be all that fast if they don't use their front brakes at all. Go find any pro level rider that uses just the rear brake.... go on, I'll wait. Yeah plenty of people will lose their rear brake because it gets dragged a lot, intentionally or otherwise. That doesn't mean the front isn't used, it's a different issue. Obviously braking technique is going to be a bit different on 2T vs 4T, but that doesn't negate the need for the front brake, or the physics that make it by far the powerful brake to use.

I am curious as to what 'practical setting' you speak of where front brakes don't work? How about a steep downhill for example? Good luck with that with just the rear brake.

Exactly, that's what I mean when you take up the difference with the front brake. Sometimes you dab with it, sometimes you use steady pressure other times your damn near locked at both ends. But find me a real fast 2T guy who says they view their front caliper as their main brake. You won't because most fast guys use their rear wheel as a pivot point and do the rest with the throttle. Steep downhills are different. I've always said that in super steep downhills, locking up the rear wheel is ineviable. That's where you need to apply steady pressure to the front for extra power. But using my front brake as a primary is friggin ludicrous!! The last thing you want whèn descending steep ledges, hills, hitting braking bumps,slamming into sand turns ect....is more nose dive. Sometimes you get in a jam and have to slam both brakes...but that's rare. If you haven't, come down to ca and run a national H&H, then you'll see the very definition of steep nasty hills where you want to keep your front end as light as possible....cause to much front brake at the wrong time and you get to watch your bike do cartwheels over your head :-/

Welp, I'm not braking on nice level ground and I'm not looking to come to a nice gradual, controlled stop. Grab a handful of front brake at speed and see what happens. Plus, I'm always covering the rear brake to keep the ass end from spiking on me in whoops, chop, rocks ect. These bikes aren't 4T's. they're meant to be backed into corners and steered with the rear wheel

Maybe we have 2 different riding styles but myself and pretty much every fast guy I know, looses their rear brake for a little bit at some point during an offroad race. Like I said, I only use my front brake to make up the difference or get my front wheel to bite for traction when I need it to. Yes your right, front brakes provide more stopping power in a perfect setting, but not the right kind of stopping power in a practical setting. End of story.

End of story? Really? so you are the authority on this subject? hahaha i'd say perhaps you may need to work on your braking, you are obviously doing it wrong. rough ground, smooth ground, braking bumps, etc.. braking is braking, just because you cannot do it effectively does not mean that others are as skill limited as you are. perhaps you should re-evaluate your skills before handing out advice, that or get out of first gear now and then and see how not using your front brake works on corner entry... i would not have to use my front brake either if i rode around and never shifted out of first gear. not that anyone is taking you seriously but it's still interesting if you actually believe what you are saying here... cheers.

Believe me dude, I by no way consider myself the authotity on 2T braking. Hell, I just switched back to 2Ts 3 years ago and had to completely change my riding style and break bad habits to adapt. Wether or not I'm qualified to give advice...well that's in tge eye of the beholder. I do consider myself better than average, and this is how I've been taught by the really, really fast guys I ride with. There's always more than one way to skin a cat...this is what I have found is the general consensus among us desert racers. I've just never in my life heard someone that I would consider a good rider say they use their front brake the primary stopping force

Edited by andrew34

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