TuBliss question

I'm just prepping my wheels for the Tubliss install (2003 CR250). The instructions clearly outline that the 8mm inner tube hole and 11mm bead lock/tire valve hole should be on the outside of 4 spokes apart.

When lining the Tubliss inner tube against the front rim however they're sitting 5 spokes apart. Anyone installed this before? Any issues with the 4 spoke instructions.

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I spaced mine at 4 spokes.....just slide the tube over a smidge

Yeah I don't understand your problem, the valve stem can be placed where ever you like but is recommended four spokes away.

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I spaced mine at 4 spokes.....just slide the tube over a smidge

Yup, I'm just an idiot, didn't realize I could shift it, was checking things out late last night with a solvent fume filled garage. Thanks for the responses guys.

I hope that set up works well for you, but I HATE tubliss.

I have a few buddies that run it and it seems like they have more flats than me, tire changes are a giant pita, and its expensive as hell. I really dont like the fact that you can't run over something sharp and then just replace a $11 tube rather than a $70-$100 tire. plus it adds a little weight. All of this for what? I run 10lbs of pressure with regular old el'cheapo tubes and cross logs and sharp rocks all the time with no problems.

Is it that beneficial to be able to run tire pressure lower than 10?

How low do you tubliss guys run?

I hope that set up works well for you, but I HATE tubliss.

I have a few buddies that run it and it seems like they have more flats than me, tire changes are a giant pita, and its expensive as hell. I really dont like the fact that you can't run over something sharp and then just replace a $11 tube rather than a $70-$100 tire. plus it adds a little weight. All of this for what? I run 10lbs of pressure with regular old el'cheapo tubes and cross logs and sharp rocks all the time with no problems.

Is it that beneficial to be able to run tire pressure lower than 10?

How low do you tubliss guys run?

If you get a flat with the tubliss system you can ride all day on it and hardly notice it compared to a flat tube (I rode 70 miles of single track last weekend, got a flat some where in there and didn't even notice until loading my bike on the trailer).

You can also plug the hole with a tire plug kit then fill it with a small bicycle pump. I carry these tools with me and can patch a hole, fill it and be riding again in about 5 min.

Yes, running lower than 10 psi is a huge advantage. I run about 4 psi in the rear unless I am in the desert and it is night and day different than 10 psi.

If you get a flat with the tubliss system you can ride all day on it and hardly notice it compared to a flat tube (I rode 70 miles of single track last weekend, got a flat some where in there and didn't even notice until loading my bike on the trailer).

You can also plug the hole with a tire plug kit then fill it with a small bicycle pump. I carry these tools with me and can patch a hole, fill it and be riding again in about 5 min.

Yes, running lower than 10 psi is a huge advantage. I run about 4 psi in the rear unless I am in the desert and it is night and day different than 10 psi.

This^^^^

I also run at 4psi and had this system for about 8 months with no major issues. For a while I was loosing air in the rear which took about a week to go completly flat but fixed it by using a couple ounces of slime. And like mentioned above most punctures can be fixed w plugs which I also keep on me. And yes the tubliss system might be heavier than regular tubes but are lighter than UHD tubes.

I don't know why people bitch about the installation of these things...IMO it's not much more difficult than changing a conventional set up. Just have to be a lttle careful installing the inner bladder.

This^^^^

I also run at 4psi and had this system for about 8 months with no major issues. For a while I was loosing air in the rear which took about a week to go completly flat but fixed it by using a couple ounces of slime. And like mentioned above most punctures can be fixed w plugs which I also keep on me. And yes the tubliss system might be heavier than regular tubes but are lighter than UHD tubes.

I don't know why people bitch about the installation of these things...IMO it's not much more difficult than changing a conventional set up. Just have to be a lttle careful installing the inner bladder.

Installation may be trickier than with tubes at first, but I have been running tubliss front and rear for about three years now and tire changes are much quicker than with tubes once you get the hang of it.

I don't get any less flats than i did when using HD tubes, but I can fix them in about 5 min as opposed to 30+ min. and the plug kit is so much lighter than tire irons and an axle wrench to carry around with you.

I just put some Slime into my new HD tubes on the wood wheel sets and ride. If you get a pinch, the Slime will, hopefully, work it's magic and you won't even know.

I just put some Slime into my new HD tubes on the wood wheel sets and ride. If you get a pinch, the Slime will, hopefully, work it's magic and you won't even know.

In my experience slime is only good for finding the hole (look for the green ooz), not plugging it. I stopped running it about 6 months ago after running it for two years with no luck.

If it's old in an open container or sitting in the tire for a long time it won't work any more.

If it's old in an open container or sitting in the tire for a long time it won't work any more.

Never was in the tire for more than a few months and what wasn't in the tire was kept in a sealed container. I just never had much luck with it so I don't use it. Plugs and patches stick much better when you don't use slime also.

Installation may be trickier than with tubes at first, but I have been running tubliss front and rear for about three years now and tire changes are much quicker than with tubes once you get the hang of it.

I don't get any less flats than i did when using HD tubes, but I can fix them in about 5 min as opposed to 30+ min. and the plug kit is so much lighter than tire irons and an axle wrench to carry around with you.

Well I've only done it once...but will be doing it again soon cause my rear wheel needs some new sneakers.

I'm sure the more tire changes I do the easier it will get.

Not sure if slime works for pinch flats...

30 days is about all it's good for after you open the container or put it into a tube.

Never was in the tire for more than a few months and what wasn't in the tire was kept in a sealed container.

Edited by Eddie8v

Yes, running lower than 10 psi is a huge advantage. I run about 4 psi in the rear unless I am in the desert and it is night and day different than 10 psi.

This^^^^

I also run at 4psi and had this system for about 8 months with no major issues. For a while I was loosing air in the rear which took about a week to go completly flat but fixed it by using a couple ounces of slime. And like mentioned above most punctures can be fixed w plugs which I also keep on me. And yes the tubliss system might be heavier than regular tubes but are lighter than UHD tubes.

Installed them last night, initial setup added some steps but you guys were right, no more difficult than a conventional setup once you have the system in place. Will test the pressure when I get home, hopefully all thumbs up.

What kind of terrain are you guys running 4psi on? We ride some extremely rocky stuff here in Alberta so I'm cautious to run that low (I've heard the TuBliss can get flats easy in the rocks).

Installed them last night, initial setup added some steps but you guys were right, no more difficult than a conventional setup once you have the system in place. Will test the pressure when I get home, hopefully all thumbs up.

What kind of terrain are you guys running 4psi on? We ride some extremely rocky stuff here in Alberta so I'm cautious to run that low (I've heard the TuBliss can get flats easy in the rocks).

When running Tubliss, tire selection is extremely important I have come to find out. I started out by running just any old front or rear tire and was getting a lot of punctures. They are pluggable, but still annoying. After talking with Jeff from Tubliss he recommended some tires to me that he claims are "virtually bullet proof". I am now running a Dunlop 908 front and Dunlop 739 AT rear. They are on the expensive side, but I have had no punctures since switching over this winter. However, I have not been to a really high speed area yet. I will be heading to a more desert like area in a few weeks, but since these are more of a desert tire I expect them to hold up well.

When running Tubliss, tire selection is extremely important I have come to find out. I started out by running just any old front or rear tire and was getting a lot of punctures. They are pluggable, but still annoying. After talking with Jeff from Tubliss he recommended some tires to me that he claims are "virtually bullet proof". I am now running a Dunlop 908 front and Dunlop 739 AT rear. They are on the expensive side, but I have had no punctures since switching over this winter. However, I have not been to a really high speed area yet. I will be heading to a more desert like area in a few weeks, but since these are more of a desert tire I expect them to hold up well.

Can you post that list of tires here?

I've got a stock of Maxxis Maxxcross IT (rear) and Michelin M12 (front) so don't think I'll be buying more until next season.

Can you post that list of tires here?

I've got a stock of Maxxis Maxxcross IT (rear) and Michelin M12 (front) so don't think I'll be buying more until next season.

I didn't get a real big list because I just asked for the ones he thought were the toughest.

Front:

Dunlop 908

Rear:

Dunlop 739 AT

Sedona 8871

He also mentioned that they will be coming out with their own tires specifically designed to be used with the tubliss system, but probably won't be until 2014. They had some made a few months ago when I talked with him, but they want to do a year of testing before releasing them. As long as they are at a competitive price I will be trying them out for sure. They are supposed to have more plies than any other tire to make them super tough and designed to be run at around 1-2 psi because they are so stiff.

Edited by woods-rider

More plies and tough = heavy. Why not just run bib mousse or UHD tubes?

Just an update, ran the TuBliss out in BC last weekend running 12PSI front and rear (high speed riding on log road switchbacks and some semi technical double track trail). Ended up blowing a flat on the front about an hour into the ride, didn't even notice until my buddy pointed it out. Was able to run another 3 hours on it like that, just avoided the square edge rocks and no bent rim.

One thing we did notice, the guy I was riding with was running the same psi with an HD tube and we were doing some rock face step ups. When looking at the compression pics (suspension totally compressed in the rear with full weight against the rock face) his tire was still full wall height but you could see the tire compress with my setup. After he saw that he was sold on the setup.

I've thrown slime in the front and rear since then as well as following the TuBliss instructions to reseat the tire, so we'll see how it runs the next ride at 8psi rear and 10 front.

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