carrying speed through corners

hey guys im relatively new to motocross and have only been to the track a handful of times, but my biggest concern right now is keeping my speed up and getting through corners SAFELY! i figure once i get that down then the jumping and actually clearing the jumps will come. But right now my biggest problem is keeping my front wheel in a rut. ive been practicing getting up on the tank, elbows up and overgripped, and weighting the outside peg.. but my front tire keeps jumping out! how do i stop my front end from jumping out? it doesnt matter whether its a bowl corner or even a homemade rut/berm.. am i maybe not leaning it over enough?

Any helps great!

hey guys im relatively new to motocross and have only been to the track a handful of times, but my biggest concern right now is keeping my speed up and getting through corners SAFELY! i figure once i get that down then the jumping and actually clearing the jumps will come. But right now my biggest problem is keeping my front wheel in a rut. ive been practicing getting up on the tank, elbows up and overgripped, and weighting the outside peg.. but my front tire keeps jumping out! how do i stop my front end from jumping out? it doesnt matter whether its a bowl corner or even a homemade rut/berm.. am i maybe not leaning it over enough?

Any helps great!

Drag the front brake to keep it planted in the rut and be steady with the throttle. Keeping a little load on the motor will allow you to lean over further and will keep the bike pushing into the rut instead of just wanting to fall or skip over the rut. You may not be leaning enough but you should still be able to keep your tire in the rut to a certain extent. Remeber, clutch, throttle, and brakes will all effect your cornering ability, as well as body position.

For me, I usually do not try to keep the front tire directly for the rut, but rather a few inches to the inside of the rut. When I get back on the gas the back tire will fall into place and allow me to gas hard out of the corner but you will learn that stuff as you get faster. I also found that the lower I keep the RPM's at the entrance of the corner, the easier it is to gas all the way through the turn.

I am making all my suggestions based off of assumption because obviously I have not seen you ride. Seat time is your friend... the more you ride the better you will get. Try different positions on the bike and see what works for you.

The last thing I will say is to get your brake work done before the turn instead of in the turn so you can throttle through it. Stay off the clutch so that the motor will stay under load, and use it to build rpms, not to brake.

Hope that helps a little.

Edited by BDubb106

Most likely, you're slowing down too much. There is a speed threshold and if you're above that (going in too fast) you need the skills to counteract it. If you're below that (going in too slow) your tires won't want to grip and you'll have all sorts of issues.

People forget this and its such a critical element of riding any motorcycle. When you hit a corner hard, the suspension compresses, but most importantly, the tire's contact patch increases under the G forces (weight) of the machine and rider. Its critical to carry a good amount of corner speed to keep that contact patch large, but it does take a lot more skill to deal with those speeds.

You aren't going to have the proper speed without the appropriate skills, its not going to happen. So take your time and remember to brake less, carry more speed and focus on looking through the corner at your exit, lean the bike as much as you can and get back on that throttle as quickly as possible.

Biggest things I have found for flowing through rutted corners fast is to lay the bike over way further than you think you should, and don't try to turn the bike much at all. If you just lay the bike over with vary little input to the handlbars then the bike will tend to just follow the rut very nicely. If you get tight and try to turn the bike with the bars then you end up fighting the bike and popping out of the rut.

The thing that has helped me the most is to aim a bit inside of the rut as is stated above then to look through the turn. Every time I find myself fixing my eyes on the rut I pop right out of it.

thats a good idea looking to the inside! and so what then? just try to keep my speed up going in and laying it over more?

Yep... I explained it earlier in the thread. Put your front wheel a few inches inside of the rut, rather than right in line with it and lean the bike in. The back tire will fall into the rut allowing you to power all the way through the rut, also known as railing those ruts... :thumbsup: Dont worry about getting the front tire in the rut, it will go where you point it... if you have a decent set up that is.

Could there be suspension issues too?

could be... i dont really know enough about suspensions to get it where it should be... softer makes it turn sharper, harders better on jumping and harder hits? my spring rates are about right and i think my sags good so if its suspension its probably the clickers...

The break-through thing for me with ruts was keeping my body in-line with the bike. Laying the bike over underneath like you would for a flat corner doesn't work in ruts.

If there is a good berm or rut to lay into then you don't need to weight the outside foot peg . Weighting the outside foot peg is only beneficial for flat corners

thanks, ill try that out

For suspension changes i would suggest playing with the fork rebound. At my practice track it was all small chop and rutted corners and speeding up the rebound(counterclockwise)seemed to really help the bike settle and not try to jump out of ruts as easily. I returned all my clickers to baseline and started from there. Just a couple clicks on the rebound really makes a difference so only move 2 clicks at a time.

Also don't forget to enter the corner a little from the outside when approaching a deep rutted corner. Enter from the inside and you will either compress the suspension too hard as you slam the rut or in the case of sand, blow the berm.

1, Look far far ahead. Your brain and body will learn to calculate the arc to connect where you are to where youi are looking.

2. Learn to err to the side of leaning the bike TOO much. Then when you are going to low side...learn to use throttle to hold the bike up.

3. Practice on shorter corners. The longer a rutted corner...the harder it is to not mess up.

4. Do not sit too soon. Ruts will have deeper spots which follow the rythm of the faster riders suspensions loading and unloading. You dont want to sit right where the rut starts...you want to sit at the 1st really deep spot, which will often be more than a bike length into the rut. I always screw this one up.

5. Develop solid flat corvering skills 1st

Some of the more advanced techniques or adjustments noted here are way way beyond you (and me), and will only mess you, and me up.

Edited by Blutarsky

When I'm lose and just looking thruough the turns the bike just turns and goes where its supposed to. When I try to turn the bike is when it doesn't turn very well

I'll add this as well. Besides carrying more speed than you think. The more you lean the bike over, and the higher you carry your inside leg the better you can get thru the corner. You have to trust it. An advanced technique is to pull the front end out of the rut to the inside as the rutted corner is straightening out onto smoother ground for more traction and less chop. It saves you a lot of energy. I got that from Gary.

Edited by j368

If you get a rut just right you initially may get the sense you are falling over, you need to be aggressive with your lean angle and throttle as you drop into the rut, all a rut is a mini berm, the problem I face with ruts is not leaning far enough and standing the bike up to soon. if you watch some pros you will notice some slam into the ruts, so as long as you initiate the turn soon enough like some have suggested here you should be fine. throttle control is key to keep you from falling down or high siding.

hey guys im relatively new to motocross and have only been to the track a handful of times, but my biggest concern right now is keeping my speed up and getting through corners SAFELY! i figure once i get that down then the jumping and actually clearing the jumps will come. But right now my biggest problem is keeping my front wheel in a rut. ive been practicing getting up on the tank, elbows up and overgripped, and weighting the outside peg.. but my front tire keeps jumping out! how do i stop my front end from jumping out? it doesnt matter whether its a bowl corner or even a homemade rut/berm.. am i maybe not leaning it over enough?

Any helps great!

Yes, sounds like you're not leaning it over far enough. Riding ruts (berms) well is an advanced technique. When dealing with these deep rutted lines in the track there is little to no room for error. To do it correctly you have to have all the basics down and have a lot of seat time under your helmet. Some of the keys to pay attention to are; getting lined up ahead of time for the entrance of the rut, controlling the front and/or rear brakes until the transition (where you go from braking to accelerating) then controlling the clutch and throttle and controlling the lean of the bike. Also try to look ahead up around the berm a little ways not just in front of the fender. Stay loose with your upper body so you can quickly and easily move from side to side in order to keep your balance. These key points should help but remember it does take a lot of practice to get good in berms. In July 2011 I released a new DVD called Motocross Bermed Corners from my 2011 Volume 3 Series. See a free preview, order a DVD disc or download at; http://wp.gsmxs.com/...ner-techniques/

MX Berm Corner box cover 240.jpg

Edited by Gary_Semics

I believe races are won in the corners (and the start). They are the greatest separator of riders lap times. Practice a lot and good luck.

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