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2001 kx 125

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Anyone know the socket size of the rear axle nut on a 2001 kx 125? Manual says the thread size is 18mm if that helps.

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i just use an adjustable wrench

aka = Japanese torque wrench :lol:

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Anyone know the socket size of the rear axle nut on a 2001 kx 125? Manual says the thread size is 18mm if that helps.

It is 27mm. If you don't have a 27mm tool, then 1 and 1/16" is 26.9875mm

Should be 32mm

...but it ain't (2003+...yes ///// 2002 on back to 1986 or so, 27mm)

i just use an adjustable wrench

Please don't. Also, please don't come on here telling others that you do.

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Please don't. Also, please don't come on here telling others that you do.

I do it all the time on both my street bike and dirt bikes and i have never had issues...

i'm not talking about a pipe wrench that will ruin the nut i'm talking about something with smooth jaws, just a regular adjustable wrench.

tell me why i should not use it for the axle nut?

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I see that proper tools, proper torque, etc. means little to you. Given the choice, I think most other people would prefer a properly torqued axle nut before going high speed on a street bike.

How do YOU know when to stop tightening it??

Edited by KDXGarage

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I agree with KDX that you SHOULD use proper tools with torque wrenches if you have the choice, I was just trying to help a dude with another option to get back on his bike asap.

I can tell when to stop tightening my rear axle by feeling. (castle nuts with cotter pins are pretty easy to tell when they're torqued right IMO)

I always use proper tools and torque wrench for more sensitive parts on the bike (motor, drain bolts, fork tubes, etc.) but i feel like this can be easily done without...

If you don't feel comfortable, use a torque wrench.

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