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Standing up while riding

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I am trying to practice riding standing up more. Do you guys have any tips to make riding while standing almost all the time a habit.

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Grip with your knee's. Standing up will save your arms, and tons of energy. Most riders including myself could/should stand up more. While racing i stand up as much as i can, if you can make a habbit of it it will help you tremendously. The only way to do that is practice practice practice.

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As pointed out above, learning how to grip with your knees is he most important element.

You can practice standing up all the time by simply riding around the track and not sitting down, even in corners. Learn how to steer the bike standing, learn how to brake, shift and clutch whilst standing. Then once you've got that all working well, sit only when exiting corners, be off the seat everywhere else. The goal with standing, isn't to be upright the whole time, its to be off the seat so your weight is going through the pegs and not the seat. Weighting the pegs, puts even distribution of the riders weight between the front and rear wheels. When you sit down, you're loading up the rear end and that can cause a lot of bike handling issues.

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Most beginers and even many novice riders tend to lean back when standing or sitting, which puts more tension in the upperbody because they're gripping the bars tightly. Whether sitting or standing most of the time you want to be exactly on the pivot point of the bike. This way if you lean your upper body forward you are putting more weight on the front of the pivot point, if you lean your upper body back you are putting more weight behind the pivot point. Staying in the midle or pivot point of your bike also allows your upper body to relax and flow with the bike instead of always fighting it. Correct body position and movements are definitely a ground floor foundation that needs to be corrected if you want to advance.

Edited by maxamillion125
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Weighting the pegs, puts even distribution of the riders weight between the front and rear wheels. When you sit down, you're loading up the rear end and that can cause a lot of bike handling issues.

Thats incorrect. Standing doesn't distribute the riders weight evenly and sitting down doesn't load up the rear. It all depends on body postion and upperbody lean. I can be perfectly balanced on the bike if I'm sitting directly above the pivot point and my upper body is neutral. Likewise, I can be standing on the pegs but be leaning forward or backwards, thats not even distribution between the front and rear wheels. Just cause your standing on the pegs doesn't mean your weight is evenly balanced.

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Thats incorrect. Standing doesn't distribute the riders weight evenly and sitting down doesn't load up the rear. It all depends on body postion and upperbody lean. I can be perfectly balanced on the bike if I'm sitting directly above the pivot point and my upper body is neutral. Likewise, I can be standing on the pegs but be leaning forward or backwards, thats not even distribution between the front and rear wheels. Just cause your standing on the pegs doesn't mean your weight is evenly balanced.

When speaking about neutral riding technique (which is all I'm talking about) standing on the pegs does weight the bike properly. Again, sit down going off a jump face, what happens? You get more pop because you just loaded up the rear of the bike. Do the same thing standing and you won't get that pop. This is a perfect example of what happens when you sit vs stand.

Yes, when standing, heavily leaning forward or backwards, does change the weight distribution of the machine. But, I wasn't talking about that, not in the slightest. I was referring to neutral riding, being smack dab over the center line of the machine when standing.

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That's right Max! In fact sitting on the bike raises the center of gravity because your weight is higher when on the seat. If Tye really knew what he was talking about he would have experienced a steep/long faced jump sitting in the neutral postion doesn't "pop" you up anymore than standing.

Tye this is what you said..." Weighting the pegs, puts even distribution of the riders weight between the front and rear wheels. When you sit down, you're loading up the rear end and that can cause a lot of bike handling issues." .....Totally false.


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When speaking about neutral riding technique (which is all I'm talking about) standing on the pegs does weight the bike properly. Again, sit down going off a jump face, what happens? You get more pop because you just loaded up the rear of the bike. Do the same thing standing and you won't get that pop. This is a perfect example of what happens when you sit vs stand.

Your grasping at straws now. You said sitting down always puts more weight in the back of the bike and your using a specefic technique like seat bouncing to validate yourself. When you seat bounce your not anywhere near the pivot point of the bike, your pulling back on the handlebars and on the very back of the seat.

Yes, when standing, heavily leaning forward or backwards, does change the weight distribution of the machine. But, I wasn't talking about that, not in the slightest. I was referring to neutral riding, being smack dab over the center line of the machine when standing.

The same thing can be said about sitting.

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That's right Max! In fact sitting on the bike raises the center of gravity because your weight is higher when on the seat.

I understand the confusion now... Your definition of sitting on the seat vs my definition of sitting on the seat.

I don't define sitting on the seat as being perfectly neutral, ball sack in the tank. That is almost impossible to do consistently outside of cornering, which is clearly not the discussion. The vast majority of people (including pros) sit way far back on the seat if they sit at all.

Marvin_Musquin_Loket_2008.jpg

If Tye really knew what he was talking about he would have experienced a steep/long faced jump sitting in the neutral postion doesn't "pop" you up anymore than standing.

First off, I rarely go off jump faces sitting unless I need to seat bounce something.

Second, I understand where you're coming from and yes, if you're sitting way up front on the seat over the tank, the effect is much less. However, the vast majority of riders sit farther back then the fuel cap on the seat.

Sorry, lots of misinterpretations.

Edited by tye1138

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There has got to be a gazillion pictures/videos of guys going off jumps sitting forward on the bike. Most supercross triples are taken like that. Tye pull out one of your transworld mx issues where you get all your info and find what I am talking about. Sitting on the bike going off a jump face is not just for seat bouncing. It's also a nice way to throw whips and scrubs.

Edited by dogfish
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There has got to be a gazillion pictures/videos of guys going off jumps sitting forward on the bike. Most supercross triples are taken like that.

For all your gazillion pix of riders with balls in the tank, I've got a bazillion pix of guys hanging off the tail over the same jumps.

Most supercross jumps are taken sitting down, preloading the rear end of the bike to get that extra pop when you leave the jump face. Because it transfers so much weight back there when you leave the jump face sitting, another side effect is better rear grip.

Tye pull out one of your transworld mx issues where you get all your info and find what I am talking about.

I only get MXA, I care more about technical stuff then picture books.

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2013 250SX champion Kenny Roczen. For sure no balls in the tank. In fact, I can't find a single pix with his balls in the tank and he rides my bike... so yea, I'm gonna take his advice on this matter. ;)

timthumb.php?src=http%3A%2F%2Fmxdose.com%2Fmxdose%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2013%2F01%2FKen_Roczen__94_KTM-Red-Bull-2013.jpg&q=90&w=260&h=260&zc=1

Ken%2BRoczen%2B70%2B%252815%2529.jpg

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Ken-Roczen-SX-Seattle-2013-e1366610430348.jpg

Edited by tye1138

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2013 250SX champion Kenny Roczen. For sure no balls in the tank. In fact, I can't find a single pix with his balls in the tank and he rides my bike... so yea, I'm gonna take his advice on this matter.

Your bike is nothing like Roczens Factory ride and posting a few pics of him going through supercross whoops and seat bouncing on the back of the bike doesn't justify in the slightest amount your orginal claim that sitting down weigts the back wheel and standing balances the bike. Anyway, when would you need to seat bounce on the vet track? The track you ride is the furthest thing from a Supercross track, so stop giving out bad advice and comparing yourself to a National SX Champion.

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My advice is to ride around the track standing, learn what it feels like and then slowly bring back sitting in the corners only. That is my advice.

The other comment I made was; the reason why its important to stand is due to where the weight is on the bike. Standing on the pegs does even out the weight distribution. Proof of that is why you measure sag when standing vs sitting. Yes, if you sit balls in the tank, you will also even out the weight distribution. But unfortunately, not very many people do that, especially people who come on a forum and ask questions like this. Most people sit further back on the seat, loading up the rear and the images above are proof of that concept from the perspective of a national champion.

If you wish to prove my comment is incorrect, I gave you the instructions above. Its very straight forward stuff and its a lot of fun to actively see how moving your weight around the bike actually effects weight distribution. You can then also experiment with going off a jump face with your balls in the tank vs sitting further back and understand why further back loads the bike totally differently.

Anyway, none of this is rocket science. Standing on the pegs allows you the best bike balance and keeps your body free to load the front/rear more or less during your ride.

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2013 250SX champion Kenny Roczen. For sure no balls in the tank. In fact, I can't find a single pix with his balls in the tank and he rides my bike... so yea, I'm gonna take his advice on this matter. ;)

Your problem is you're running Ohlins suspension, he's running WP that's why he can do it.

Also I don't believe you have the same bike, he has a $100,000+ factory bike and you have a bike with suspension that costs more than the bike almost.

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Nuts on the tank is a forward position. You wouldn't be that far forward unles your at the apex of a corner or starting out of the gate (depending on traction).

This is Neutral position when sitting, its basically the same body positon when your standing.

pic.jpg

program to take screenshots

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The point of standing is to absorb bumps better. Your legs act as another set of shock absorbers which you lose when seated.

With regards to the whole weight placement thing. This is all with the rider in neutral position ie where the dip in the seat is. Standing places weight lower on the frame. Sitting places the weight on the top of the frame(mine on the backbone of the bike)

As an engineer I think of a lot of stuff in the free body diagram form to get the concept. Standing lowers the force, which lowers the cog which helps the suspension dampen the forces better. Sitting raises the cog which intensifies the forces acted on the suspension.

Balancing the pegs is irrelevant from sitting or standing. The pegs can be balanced either or. There's times in hare scrambles you ride a section sitting or standing and balance the pegs the same, it's all about what the bike is doing that makes you sit or stand.

FBD is engineering 101

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Nuts on the tank is a forward position. You wouldn't be that far forward unles your at the apex of a corner or starting out of the gate (depending on traction).

This is Neutral position when sitting, its basically the same body positon when your standing.

That is 100% correct.

Again, my comment was aimed at dogfish's comment; "There has got to be a gazillion pictures/videos of guys going off jumps sitting forward on the bike"

Dogfish's statement is inaccurate, most people ride further back on the seat when riding normally. Part of the reasoning for riding that way has to do with putting weight on the rear end for traction, but over a jump its to preload the rear, like I said.

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