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I'm restoring a 1982 yz125. I had to tear the bike down to change the shift forks. I'm replacing all the bolts because a lot of them are in really bad condition. So my question is should I spend more and buy OEM allen bolts or spend less and just go to my local home depot and get the bolts from there? I would prefer the home depot route but I'm not sure of the quality of their bolts. Any help is appreciated! Thanks

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Just go to home depot, unless you want to spend 1-3 dollars on a bolt that you can buy for .10 - .30 cents. Just look for the highest grade that you can find if you are concerned with the quality. Look for something in the grade 8.8 and you should be more than fine. I always go to the local hardware store when I need to replace a bolt or two. You can even buy stainless steel if you like!

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Just go to home depot, unless you want to spend 1-3 dollars on a bolt that you can buy for .10 - .30 cents. Just look for the highest grade that you can find if you are concerned with the quality. Look for something in the grade 8.8 and you should be more than fine. I always go to the local hardware store when I need to replace a bolt or two. You can even buy stainless steel if you like!

Thanks! And it wouldn't affect resale value would it?

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If you are going to do a "correct" resto, I guess that the oem bolts might come into play if the buyer is that picky about stuff. Another thing that you might want to consider is the amount of money that is put in to the restoration. You will put a ton of money into it that you will never see in your hand after a sale. You could also build a clean example of a vintage bike with home depot hardware, and a majority of buyers won't care about it. A lot of the vintage buyers are purchasing out of nostalgia, instead of flipping for profit. Also, some of these bikes are being raced in either vintage or bomber classes, where they regularly have bolts/nuts/hardware fall or vibrate out.

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If you are going to do a "correct" resto, I guess that the oem bolts might come into play if the buyer is that picky about stuff. Another thing that you might want to consider is the amount of money that is put in to the restoration. You will put a ton of money into it that you will never see in your hand after a sale. You could also build a clean example of a vintage bike with home depot hardware, and a majority of buyers won't care about it. A lot of the vintage buyers are purchasing out of nostalgia, instead of flipping for profit. Also, some of these bikes are being raced in either vintage or bomber classes, where they regularly have bolts/nuts/hardware fall or vibrate out.

Yeah, thats true I think I'm gonna go with the home depot bolts. The oem one would total at like $30.00 with shipping and its not worth that much if it wont make a substantial difference in the bike. Thanks for the help!

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Good choice, I don't think anybody gonna take it out on the track. Parts now-a-days for old bikes are starting to get harder to find. Look up a motorcycle salvage yard for those hard parts and bolts, prices are not to bad and you may get some idea's on what to restore next. I envy you my friend, I had a clapped out RM with a YZ motor in it and was supposed to restore it but gave up cause parts were to much. I regret not fixing it up and seeing what it had.

Edited by DarrellYZ250F

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Not a real 'resto' unless it is OEM origjnal. A knowledgeable buyer will walk from that bike unless it is real cheap. When I see a bike with non-stock hardware, I have to wonder where elese was the job cheapo'd. You are not going to find a vintage buyer who does not know what they are buying unless they just want to buy the bike to ride around in the yard ike they did when they got the same bike as a kid. Not resto'd properly, it is just a used bike in running condition.

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No matter how you cut it, if it's not oem, it's not worth as much. A "rider" 82 yz125 is $1000-$1200 bike. A OEM 82 is worth double if done correctly. 2 years ago I traded a nice 2002 xr100 for a low hour 82 yz125 straight up. i took the yz home, disassembled it and cleaned it,realized it was all original except for grips and air filter. After reassembly, it looked like a 30-40 hour unraced bike. i thought the xr was worth $1300. Eventually I realised that it was too nice to ride and traded it for a low mileage 85 IT200 with street title, straight up. I hope this gives you an idea of your yz's value.

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Menards is less expensive and better variety. Same brand.

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Something you guys are all missing is the bolt thread length. The after market bolts come in 5mm length sizes. So many of the their bolts are going to leave you short of full engagement and can wind up stripping threads when torqued to spec. Use OEM! How much money do you save when you strip a center case bolt hole or a head cover bolt?

Something you guys are all missing is the bolt thread length. The after market bolts come in 5mm length sizes. So many of the their bolts are going to leave you short of full engagement and can wind up stripping threads when torqued to spec. Use OEM! How much money do you save when you strip a center case bolt hole or a head cover bolt?

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The ones I got at Menards were mostly threaded all the way to the head. They have both types. Most I got were 10.9's. One bolt I didn't find and re-used the old one.

I understand the concerns about resale value and the threads using similar fasteners, but in my case, neither are a problem. I did save all the OEM stuff, in carefully unlabelled coffee cans, just in case🤣 Hopefully, if I go to the effort of doing a full restoration, it won't be on an SP250!

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The ones I got at Menards were mostly threaded all the way to the head. They have both types. Most I got were 10.9's. One bolt I didn't find and re-used the old one.

I understand the concerns about resale value and the threads using similar fasteners, but in my case, neither are a problem. I did save all the OEM stuff, in carefully unlabelled coffee cans, just in case🤣 Hopefully, if I go to the effort of doing a full restoration, it won't be on an SP250!

How far up the bolt shank the thread goes has nothing to do with to full thread engagement to the part. The bolt's length is

what creates full engagement.

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Something you guys are all missing is the bolt thread length. The after market bolts come in 5mm length sizes. So many of the their bolts are going to leave you short of full engagement and can wind up stripping threads when torqued to spec. Use OEM! How much money do you save when you strip a center case bolt hole or a head cover bolt?

yamaha used standard size increments on the yz series. to the best of my knowledge only honda used a lot of oddball lengths (24mm and 28mm for example.) other manufactures occasionally (suzuki mainly) used non standard lengths also.. but thankfully honda drilled and tapped the bosses where 25mm and 30mm works perfectly fine. din standard aftermarket bolts come basically in these lengths: 4,6,8,10,12,16,18,20,22,25,30,35,40,45,50,55,60,65,70,75,80 and then by 10mm lengths after 80.... occcasionally you will run into a 115mm or 125mm but not often. aftermarket is perfectly fine. BUT a serious collector will discount obvious non oem fasteners.... and any collector can order or replate oem fasteners - they are not hard to come by. just pricey sometimes.

Edited by nyabinghi

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Oh, I gotcha now rusty. Hoosiers are a little slower than Buckeyes. Then bolts I bought were the same length, except where I wanted to go to socket caps and those I had to go longer, but were on through holes so it didn't matter. I forgot, I had a pair to replace where the hex head size was critical, and the replacements had larger heads, so those I did not replace either.

Also, the blackened finish on the socket cap head screws sucks. It rusts after it gets wet once.

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