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40 mm static sag?

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I know this has been beaten to death but I need to be reassured. I was at the track today and a local tuner was there, he said my static sag was way off... I am at 30 mm static and 102 rider , he said I should be at 40 mm static, who is right?

Btw I weigh 195 and run a 5.6 in the back and .45 ( stock) in the front. Tia

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That is the eternal question.......My tuner sprung my last bike to where as my race sag was 102 my static sag was 32mm.Problem was for me is the springs were just too light for my riding (mx). My new bike with stock suspension has 100mm of sag and 42mm static sag and it feels great. I know it's rated for a heavier rider but the faster I go the better the ride. :ride:

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you're right there at the maybe point. Between 30-40 should be the optimum. Is the current suspension giving you problems?

I have had decent luck on occassion just setting the free sag at 30mm and ride it. the race sag was 105mm (fortunately) and I left it alone.

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you're right there at the maybe point. Between 30-40 should be the optimum. Is the current suspension giving you problems?

I have had decent luck on occassion just setting the free sag at 30mm and ride it. the race sag was 105mm (fortunately) and I left it alone.

I am not sure if I am a good enough rider to articulate if its giving me problems...my biggest issue has been turning on tight MX tracks, I think alot of that is technique though. This weekend I was bottoming (forks) on a step down double, thinking of going to a .47 on forks and getting a revalve from FC. The rear kicks occasionally, I guess will back off pre load slightly to get 35mm free and about 105 rider sag.

I assumed less sag would help the bike corner a little better....

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You may want to try a bit less sag. Try setting your sag to about 97mm, and see how it feels. My 08 YZF250 turns better with the forks 5mm up in the clamps and about 95-100mm of race sag. You want your race sag to be in the 95-105mm range, anything else is considered unconventional. I personally feel that your static sag is close enough that a spring change is not required. I would always rather be slighting oversprung than undersprung.

As for turning, it took me a long time to figure out the finess of making the YZF turn consisentenly. When using the correct technique, the bike is an adequate turner, but a mistake on the approach can easily make for a bike that wants to stand up and overshoot the corner. I am not familiar with the new frame YZF's, but on the old frames you needed to have a decent lean to the bike on entry of the corner, and the sooner you can roll on the throttle the better. I would just make sure your in the proper range, and it sounds like you are, and then go out and practice your corners. Dont just go out and ride, actually practice entering the corner with your nuts on the tanks, a good lean on entry, and getting back on the throttle asap. It can take a long time to really learn how to judge entry speed, so practice staying on the gas long enough that you havent slowed down to much before you even hit the corner.

I have been riding 8 years now, Im 29 years old, and what I have learned is to go back to the basic. Its impossible to truly go fast if your foundation sucks. I was just trying to go as fast as I could for years now, and what I have learned is that my technique was sloppy and I was exhausted very quickly. Things like gripping the bike with your legs and knees, staying neutral on the bike, stand more often than not. If you can stand everyone but the apex of coners, you will likely become much quicker. These are things that I have gone back to, and am working on because in the long run, thats whats going to allow me to really become a better rider. Build a solid foundation first. Its just like an olympic weight lifter, you dont start out training with the max weight you can handle, you go with less weight and work on your technique and control, and then build from there. Riding is the same, if your trying to go at max speed, your probably sacraficing the fundamentals to do it. Work on making those second nature first, and then the speed will come from there. I was getting so discouraged because my speed and endurance werent really improving much over the past few years, but now I realize that I never built a truly solid foundation to build off. Back to the basic for me, and a little something for yourself to consider.

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I am not sure if I am a good enough rider to articulate if its giving me problems...my biggest issue has been turning on tight MX tracks, I think alot of that is technique though. This weekend I was bottoming (forks) on a step down double, thinking of going to a .47 on forks and getting a revalve from FC. (Try adding more fork oil until it stops bottoming)

The rear kicks occasionally, I guess will back off pre load slightly to get 35mm free and about 105 rider sag.

I assumed less sag would help the bike corner a little better.... not really

Is the kicking a gas on problem or a gas off problem? Either way, turn you HS Comp dial about 1/4 turn in 1 direction or the other and see how that affects both turning and kick issues. The HS will affect how the rear stays up or down while in motion on the gas.. It will also affect how it handles the chop. It has been my experience that if you can get the bike to corner as you like it, the suspension works pretty well on the rest of the track.

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There are no free lunches... You have to work. Make changes..and see how the bike rides. If you can not tell the difference in settings..then ride more.

Recently, I had my suspension serviced. When I put it all back on, I went to the track...and the bike rode horrible. When seated in a corner...if I increased steering...it would knife, I would lose the rear....then when I countersteered...it would high side. I started reducing static sag......and after a few adjustments....it was back to normal. What I had done was rely on rider sag measurements...but I must have been sitting on the bike differently than previous measurements. Static sag is a good relative measure....because there are fewer variables.....but it is a less meaningful absolute measurement. Rider sag is key, but it is hard to get an accurate measurement....so that makes it problematic. When push comes to shove...you MUST be able to make changes...and feel the changes in handling.

FYI...my static sag is about 28-29 mm...rider sag is probably about 102, seated in the central position.

Assuming everything is measured properly, 40mm static would imply a fairly stiff set up. When rider sag is roughly correct (100-104mm), stiffer springs result in MORE static sag. So....if your "tuner" is saying that your static sag is too low...when your rider sag is in range...what he is really saying is you need a stiffer spring set up. If he does not understand this...take advice from someone else...of just experiment on your own.

Edited by Blutarsky

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I am not familiar with the new frame YZF's, but on the old frames you needed to have a decent lean to the bike on entry of the corner, and the sooner you can roll on the throttle the better.

Agree. I ride an 06...and if you rely on bar turn to initiate, you will struggle. You must know how to start leaning the bike standing...using the rear brake as you enter a corner. You must know how to really lean the bike in even more as you sit. In other words...you start the turn on the YZ all with lean....and you fine tune and finish the turn using the bars.... Novice riders can really struggle on the YZf....

Edited by Blutarsky
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