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HDTube vs. Tubeless vs. Mousse

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I've been looking for some opinions on the best set up to run for general trail riding with a healthy amount of rocks. I've been running the Heavy Duty tubes in my CRF and they have done well. But I still worry about them. Tubeless scares the crap out of me. What happens if the tire is punctured or rolled off the bead? The mouse tire looks cool but not sure if it all its cracked up to be. Thoughts?

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When I moved to AZ I put in ultra heavy duty tubes front and rear. Not one issue and I've ridden over some nasty crap here.

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My vote is for ultra hd tubes. Heavy but worth it. This past months issue of dirt rider they actually mentioned how in all the bike testing and the hundreds upon hundreds of miles on each bike through Rocks's and ruts etc, they are suprised they have yet to get a flat.

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I switched from HD tubes to Tubeliss about 2 years ago and I'll never look back. I'm the guy that always gets flats - like literally 1-3 per year. Its not where I ride either. I'll ride the same trails as my friends and I'll get a flat and they won't. At least flats are a short affair now. I use a bit of water from my camelback to find the leak, then my $30 plug kit with a $20 bike pump and I'm back on the trail in under 10 minutes. No need to pull the tire off the bike. During last year's LAB2V I had a massive 1" gash in my front tire. No problem. I rode it flat for 35 miles to the nearest shop to get a new tire. Rim and Tubeliss were fine. The Tubeliss holds the bead the entire way around the wheel so you're not going to roll it off, ever. I saw a review where they ran an entire MX race on a flat tire running a Tubeliss and it stayed on the whole time. Its an awesome system and I'd consider it probably my favorite aftermarket addition to do on any bike.

Mousse looks cool but supposedly overheats when used on the road. Since I dual sport with my bike, the Tubeliss system was the obvious choice.

Edited by wallrat

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How does it compare to your Central City Rocks or Red Cone?

A lot of square edge rocks here. Enough to make you think there is something wrong with your suspension. The ultra HD tubes take the pounding.

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Another Tubliss convert here, front and rear. I have used Tubliss for over three years now with no problems other than about 1 or 2 flats a year which were all easily and quickly repaired with plugs.

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Another Tubliss convert here, front and rear. I have used Tubliss for over three years now with no problems other than about 1 or 2 flats a year which were all easily and quickly repaired with plugs.

Im trying to go with out any major repairs at all. I would like to get the tire repair kits and tire tools out of my tool bag.

Mousse looks cool but supposedly overheats when used on the road. Since I dual sport with my bike, the Tubeliss system was the obvious choice.

I thought they only overheated at 80+. no speed limit here in CO is over 75 and that's only the 2 major highways i doubt ill be doing 80 much lol. Is overheating a problem at lower speeds over a longer time?

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I had been using Tubliss for the last 3 years.

Have tried HD tubes with rubber grease and still got pinch flats.

I seem to get more flats with the Tubliss

I have seen one Tubliss front fail and throw a guy on his head. Said it was instant, no warning like a tube. The Tubliss looked like the bead had broken.

I have just fitted Mousse tubes and done 1 ride with them. So still out on them

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Im trying to go with out any major repairs at all. I would like to get the tire repair kits and tire tools out of my tool bag.

I thought they only overheated at 80+. no speed limit here in CO is over 75 and that's only the 2 major highways i doubt ill be doing 80 much lol. Is overheating a problem at lower speeds over a longer time?

I don't carry tire irons or a spare tube anymore, just a plug kit that comes in a pouch about the size of a sunglass case and weighs maybe 1/2 a pound. It and the bike pump easily fit in one of my fender bags along with a low pressure gauge and some other assorted tools. Plenty of videos on YouTube to show you how easy it is to plug a tire - honestly its less than 10 minutes including finding the hole and pumping the tire back up - which is easily the hardest part. I don't seem to get less or more flats with the Tubeliss, although I can see where that would be true since you don't have as thick of a rubber layer holding the air in. The flats I've had felt identical to tube flats, minus the pain in the ass repair. I can imagine that blowing out the tubeliss bladder would be pretty messy, but its protected very well so long as you're not the guy that runs with misaligned valve stems or the retaining nut cinched down lol.

One of the added bonuses is the loss of rotating mass. I saved at least 5 lbs from my fender bag, and another 6 or so from my wheels. I read somewhere that dropping a pound of unsprung weight is akin to dropping 4 pounds of suspended weight. Regardless, it was instantly noticeable when I jumped on the bike after switching over. Steering was lighter, the suspension felt smoother, and the whole bike felt a little more agile.

There was a large thread about Mousse over on advrider. As I recall, temperatures became significant even on trips at 55mph. I'd search there to confirm.

Edited by wallrat

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