Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Motorcycle Wheel Chocks- Absolutely Necessary?

Recommended Posts

I plan on transporting a new motorcycle in the bed of my pick-up approximately 40 miles. It will be a one-way trip (hopefully) from the dealer to my home. Never transported a bike before. I plan on using 4 cam-buckle straps- 2 in the front of the bike and 2 in the back. I'll probably never have to transport the bike again but if I do I'll get motorcycle chocks at that time. The road will be good (no bumps or potholes) and I'll be doing the best to avoid any sudden stops. Am I taking what one might think to be an unacceptable risk for the aforementioned transport without using chocks?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What size/type of bike? It should be fine if strapped in well. My biggest concern is to be sure the front tire doesn't turn. You could chock it either using 2x4's cut to length and wedged on each side, or larger opening vise grips on each side of tire. Anyway, you get the idea. When I haul dirt bikes in my truck I never use a chock, never had an incident. Good luck and congrats on the new bike!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Load it diagonal in the truck, wedge the front wheel into the corner of your bed and strap it down good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the replies. Assuming both my wife and I like (or at least can live with) the bike after a two-up fit check this coming Monday, it's going to be a DR650E. The dealer only had one in the crate when we went in this week so we couldn't do a test fit. Took the XTerra this week for the look-see but will take the RAM this Monday in case it's a go. The dealer is about 40 miles away. I'm sure the dealer has loaded hundreds of bikes in trucks so will be able to get some advice from him. In the Adirondacks things tend to appear primitive, but they generally do work. Necessity is the mother of invention around here because it has to be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are loading a dirt bike. Load it up like I posted above, no worries. Even if it does fall in the bed, it's a dirt bike! They are made to fall over!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just ride it home! 🙂

I might be a tad rusty as a result of having not been on a bike since 1974.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are loading a dirt bike. Load it up like I posted above, no worries. Even if it does fall in the bed, it's a dirt bike! They are made to fall over!

The bike might be made to fall over but at age 64 I'm not. I'll be riding this bike on relatively benign off-road terrain, especially with wife on back, and don't intend too many spills. Would like to keep the bike in good condition, if possible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have never used a wheel chock in my 6ft bed, S10, and I like to keep my tailgate closed. Like someone mentioned, go diagonally. Hopefully, you can read what I'm explaining.

With bike to the right side of you...

...load onto passenger side of bed...

...tie down right side handlebar to passenger/front bed loop...

...tie down left side of handlebar to driver/rear bed loop...

...close tailgate...

...tie down right foot peg to passenger/rear bed loop (forces rear tire against closed tailgate)...

...cinch down tie downs and double-check.

If you're left-handed, just reverse sides.

With this setup, you will need at least three tie downs, Your handlebars should be diagonal to your bed. I normally lift the rear wheel closer to the passenger/tail gate corner to wedge it and have more room for junk, but with your 650, you might not have that option.

Edited by seekman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have never used a wheel chock in my 6ft bed, S10, and I like to keep my tailgate closed. Like someone mentioned, go diagonally. Hopefully, you can read what I'm explaining.

With bike to the right side of you...

...load onto passenger side of bed...

...tie down right side handlebar to passenger/front bed loop...

...tie down left side of handlebar to driver/rear bed loop...

...close tailgate...

...tie down right foot peg to passenger/rear bed loop (forces rear tire against closed tailgate)...

...cinch down tie downs and double-check.

If you're left-handed, just reverse sides.

With this setup, you will need at least three tie downs, Your handlebars should be diagonal to your bed. I normally lift the rear wheel closer to the passenger/tail gate corner to wedge it and have more room for junk, but with your 650, you might not have that option.

Thanks for the instructions. I copied them to a Word file and will print out. Will try a practice run with a bicycle. Have you ever seen anyone post a video of this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The above video is the closest to what I described, except I think he wedged the front wheel into the driver/front of the bed as I can't see where he attached the 2nd ratchet tie down. He also has a Nissan crew cab shortbed.

Just noticed that you have a RAM pickup. Hopefully it's not 4x4 because I'd be more worried about loading/unloading due to height rather than to chock or not chock.

Make sure you have decently-sized (long and arched) ramp and a step up (if not a second ramp side-by-side). Loading/unloading takes a bit of technique. Maybe cheat a bit by unloading to an elevated driveway or curb.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The above video is the closest to what I described, except I think he wedged the front wheel into the driver/front of the bed as I can't see where he attached the 2nd ratchet tie down. He also has a Nissan crew cab shortbed.

Just noticed that you have a RAM pickup. Hopefully it's not 4x4 because I'd be more worried about loading/unloading due to height rather than to chock or not chock.

Make sure you have decently-sized (long and arched) ramp and a step up (if not a second ramp side-by-side). Loading/unloading takes a bit of technique. Maybe cheat a bit by unloading to an elevated driveway or curb.

It's a 4x4. I'm sure the dealer isn't going to have any problem loading it in the truck but I may have once I get home. Not more than an hour ago UPS dropped off a set of Ramp Champs (90'' maximum extension) from E-Trailer (I highly recommend them). I've scouted out my driveway for elevations and found two possibilities, one on my driveway and another on a shared road. Will do a dry run with the ramps tomorrow to see what kind of elevation I'm dealing with. Hopefully, the one on my driveway will work. The one on the shared road is about 200 feet down a hill and I'd have to push the bike up the hill. Besides, I don't want any of the neighbors to know I've got a bike. My house and driveway is at the top of a hill and completely surrounded by trees. In any case, I'm aware of the loading/unloading problem. Will figure something out. Always have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The above video is the closest to what I described, except I think he wedged the front wheel into the driver/front of the bed as I can't see where he attached the 2nd ratchet tie down. He also has a Nissan crew cab shortbed.

Just noticed that you have a RAM pickup. Hopefully it's not 4x4 because I'd be more worried about loading/unloading due to height rather than to chock or not chock.

Make sure you have decently-sized (long and arched) ramp and a step up (if not a second ramp side-by-side). Loading/unloading takes a bit of technique. Maybe cheat a bit by unloading to an elevated driveway or curb.

Forgot to say thanks for the video.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stopped at the Honda dealer (as opposed to Walmart) yesterday to get four quality cam buckle straps and four quality soft ties. Asked about a motor cycle wheel chock and he said he didn't have any in stock at the moment. Said he never uses chocks and never has had a problem hauling bikes all the way from New Hampshire to northern New York. Will take the soft ties and cam buckle straps with me tomorrow and let the dealer secure the bike in the way he recommends. Did some dry runs with the Ramp Champs at several different points on the property, including wood ramps at two different storage sheds. The most optimum was probably one of the sheds but couldn't get the truck between the house and the shed. Determined that an elevated point in my driveway was probably the best option. To obtain further angle reduction, I might stack two 2" by 12" by 10' under the Ramp Champ. Width of wood is about the same width as the Ramp Champ. Another option which would gain even less elevation would be to put the front of the second Ramp Champ under the first Ramp Champ at the ground point. Will have wife helping me. I guess we won't know what will happen until we try it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stopped at the Honda dealer (as opposed to Walmart) yesterday to get four quality cam buckle straps and four quality soft ties. Asked about a motor cycle wheel chock and he said he didn't have any in stock at the moment. Said he never uses chocks and never has had a problem hauling bikes all the way from New Hampshire to northern New York. Will take the soft ties and cam buckle straps with me tomorrow and let the dealer secure the bike in the way he recommends. Did some dry runs with the Ramp Champs at several different points on the property, including wood ramps at two different storage sheds. The most optimum was probably one of the sheds but couldn't get the truck between the house and the shed. Determined that an elevated point in my driveway was probably the best option. To obtain further angle reduction, I might stack two 2" by 12" by 10' under the Ramp Champ. Width of wood is about the same width as the Ramp Champ. Another option which would gain even less elevation would be to put the front of the second Ramp Champ under the first Ramp Champ at the ground point. Will have wife helping me. I guess we won't know what will happen until we try it.

Here's what happened. I stood in the truck bed and guided it down the ramp as far as I could. Told her to keep the bike from falling off the ramp while I jumped to the ground so I could continue to guide it. Misjudged the height of the bike on the ramp. Thought I could reach the clutch from the ground. Found out I couldn't. We were both holding the bike now but we couldn't control it. Bike fell off the ramp but no perceptible damage to the bike. Wife got bruised. No bruises to me. Lesson learned is to put a second ramp up parallel to the ramp the bike is on. Walk on the second ramp in order to reach the clutch. The whole thing was a rush job because it was late in the day when we got home. Won't rush next time. Will think ahead.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a bike stand as a stool to step down on! Good multi purpose tool!

Actually, my wife told me I was crazy to attempt to do what I did. Her thoughts were "How does he intend to walk on air?"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a bike stand as a stool to step down on! Good multi purpose tool!

this is the answer but it does require some practice become

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, my wife told me I was crazy to attempt to do what I did. Her thoughts were "How does he intend to walk on air?"

You knew better not to listen to the wife! :naughty:

Congratulations on the new bike. 👍:ride:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...