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Husaberg dirt bikes

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This is one of the first times that I've heard of these dirt bikes. I went on their website and they are pretty sick looking bikes. I was wondering if these bikes are any good because if they are i might think of buying one. So if someone can tell me a bit about them that would be great.

Thanks.

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This is one of the first times that I've heard of these dirt bikes. I went on their website and they are pretty sick looking bikes. I was wondering if these bikes are any good because if they are i might think of buying one. So if someone can tell me a bit about them that would be great.

Thanks.

Post on the make/model specific forum. Or go to KTMTalk. Husaberg is basically a KTM and '14 is its last year before being folded into the Husqvarna brand. Edited by YHGEORGE

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They are pretty impressive. Premium components. Currently they are a sub-brand of KTM, which KTM has used in the past to try experimental ideas and new tech. Awesome bikes in general. With the acquisition of Husqvarna, KTM will be combining the newly obtained company with Husaberg beginning with the 2015 model year. The jury is still out on whether or not this will be a good thing or not. Right now Husky's are pretty well built bikes at a great price. Husabergs are great bikes at a premium price. I would assume that the intent will be to elevate the Husqvarna brand, as opposed to watering down the 'Bergs.

When I was in the market for a Euro bike, I bought a KTM due to the hugh aftermarket following and the name recognition. Now, if I were planning an upgrade, i would either be looking at a 'Berg, or a Gas Gas. Niche market bikes no longer scare me.

Buy one, you won't regret it.

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Husabergs up until this point were the Rolls Royce of the Enduro world. Best components, excellent reliability and stellar looks. I have owned many bikes and ridden more than I can keep track of from Suzuki's to KTMs to Hondas to Husqvarnas.. My 2011 FE450 is the best out of them all. I love how the bergs have something that make them special. Eg, mine has the 70 degree engine. I find that my husaberg has a character. I have created a bond with this bike that just didn't exist with my prior bikes. For those reasons, Husabergs are known as the best.

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Husaberg was it's own brand from 1986 until about 1996. They were formed from the leftover facilities and employees of Husqvarna, Cagiva having bought the cycle concern from Husky and moving it to Italy, from Sweden. The early Husabergs were some of the first light weight four strokes that were competitive, taking several world titles. KTM wanted the technology, bought Husaberg, used the technology in their bikes (hence the great KTM four strokes), and seems to be ever careful to not let Husaberg overshadow the KTM branded bikes. About 2000, KTM began assembling the Swedish bikes in the KTM factory in Austria, supposedly to have more control over the build quality. Sadly, they also graced the bikes with the White Power suspension, PDS and all. They formerly had an Ohlins with a link on the rear. Since 2000, Husabergs have become more and more like a KTM. Some good, some bad (my opinion). I personally think KTM missed a chance to make a premium brand, totally outrageous, four stroke bike. And a Husaberg two stroke? It is just a KTM, no Swedish genes in it at all. A pity. You are not at much risk buying a late model Husaberg. They are as good as a KTM. note: Some of the dates stated may be off a few years, I'm sure some historian will straighten me out. But the answer here, to the original post, is pretty accurate.

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Husaberg was it's own brand from 1986 until about 1996. They were formed from the leftover facilities and employees of Husqvarna, Cagiva having bought the cycle concern from Husky and moving it to Italy, from Sweden. The early Husabergs were some of the first light weight four strokes that were competitive, taking several world titles. KTM wanted the technology, bought Husaberg, used the technology in their bikes (hence the great KTM four strokes), and seems to be ever careful to not let Husaberg overshadow the KTM branded bikes. About 2000, KTM began assembling the Swedish bikes in the KTM factory in Austria, supposedly to have more control over the build quality. Sadly, they also graced the bikes with the White Power suspension, PDS and all. They formerly had an Ohlins with a link on the rear. Since 2000, Husabergs have become more and more like a KTM. Some good, some bad (my opinion). I personally think KTM missed a chance to make a premium brand, totally outrageous, four stroke bike. And a Husaberg two stroke? It is just a KTM, no Swedish genes in it at all. A pity. You are not at much risk buying a late model Husaberg. They are as good as a KTM. note: Some of the dates stated may be off a few years, I'm sure some historian will straighten me out. But the answer here, to the original post, is pretty accurate.

Yes it is. And for many years the word reliability was not used often.

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The early Husabergs were a bike that demanded a hands on owner. I thought of them as a kit bike. I owned and raced Husabergs through the years, my first being a 1992. My 2000 FE501 came with several beer cans (empty) in the crate with it, Tuborg Gold as I remember. My 2006 FE450 was one of the best bikes of my life, right up there with the latest KTM 350XC-F.  I raced desert and rode enduros with the early ones, and did quite well. I did work on them quite a bit, more so than if I was riding a Japanese brand. The newer Bergs are beautiful KTMs with blue and yellow plastic.

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