What's the point of the 350 sxf

I have never owned a ktm. I bought a used crf 450 to get back into riding but I really like the ktm 450sx f. Can anyone tell me what is the point of the 350sxf ?? I am not knocking it I am interested in it because I'm too big for a 250 but maybe the 350 would be a good fit for me.

I ride mostly tracks and race (occasionally) in the C class. I can only assume the 350 would only be allowed in the open/450 class correct?? I thought about buying the 250 four stroke because that C class Is usually full and there would be more compotition...

Anyways what's the deal?? Thanks in advance.

To win the MX1 world championship with Cairoli?  Maybe some folks are too intimidated by the 450.

 

Cheers,

 

MrHix

i love my 350, I am an off road rider but i find the power to be perfect. A 450 in the tight stuff is just too much bike IMO and a 250 just doesnt have the ass when the stuff gets fast. It really is a good balance of everything and i can just about promise you would like it if you rode it

The 350 was ment to be the 450 killer. It was supposed to be easily ridden to the end of motos where 450 ridders would get tired. 

Options are always nice.  In 2011 I was moving up to a fullsize bike from a 150RB and was already too tall for the bike.  I figured a 250F would have been perfect at the time but I would have wanted something more within a year or so of getting comfortable on the full size bike, but a 450 would have been way to big of a jump at the time so a 350 made perfect sense for me.

I race hare scrambles and i love my 350 in the woods. feels like my last bike which was a 250f, except its quicker. 

Sounds to me like the 350 is being used more as a trail bike than a pure motorcross bike??

Sounds to me like the 350 is being used more as a trail bike than a pure motorcross bike??

I wouldn't go that far, that maybe true in the 5 responses to this thread but there are plenty of 350s on moto tracks

So would the 350 have to be raced in the 450/open class?? I figure there's no way you can race it in the 250f class. I guess it is entirely possible I could be faster with a more manageable bike.

I don't have a problem with the 450 per say but I don't use it's full potential to say the least. Just thought the 350 might be right up my alley.

Yes you will race it in the 450 class

When I look at KTM's current 4 stroke motocross lineup, the 350's role has dwindled. In the past, it was bridging the gap between the 250 and 450, it was only a few ponies more then the 250 and way less then the 450. However, in the 2013 model year, the 350SXF got A LOT better and is only a few ponies shy of the 450. The 450 got a lot lighter and has a super smooth/reliable motor, which is easier to ride longer then even the 350, which has the explosive power of the 2013 250SXF.

So today, I personally don't see the relevance of the 350, especially with Rodger DeCoster's Dungey special, which is an outstanding bike, one of the best bikes ever made.

When I look at KTM's current 4 stroke motocross lineup, the 350's role has dwindled. In the past, it was bridging the gap between the 250 and 450, it was only a few ponies more then the 250 and way less then the 450. However, in the 2013 model year, the 350SXF got A LOT better and is only a few ponies shy of the 450. The 450 got a lot lighter and has a super smooth/reliable motor, which is easier to ride longer then even the 350, which has the explosive power of the 2013 250SXF.So today, I personally don't see the relevance of the 350, especially with Rodger DeCoster's Dungey special, which is an outstanding bike, one of the best bikes ever made.

I watched the 2013 motorcross 450 shoot out and they included the 350 in testing. I gotta say I am still not sure of the point of the 350 but they claim it makes 54/53 horse power and the 450 sxf makes 57. That's pretty impressive but I still don't see the need for the 350 unless it was a lot lighter or something. Interesting.

I could see the use if it was extremely lighter than a 450. But I'd rather have the power there if I need it specially if you are a bigger dude. But people get a kick out or ringing out bikes and I believe you can do that more with the 350. 

 

There is no replacement for displacement. 

The weird thing is, it isn't all the much lighter. it weighs more than the Honda 450. Supposedly, the less rotating mass of the motor makes it feel lighter than any 450 though. I can get a smoking deal on KTMs and have been considering a 350, myself (to race VetC/B) but just can't seem to pull the trigger on it. It's a very tempting bike, but as a few of you guys have said, I just don't know what to think about it, due to it's weight/power etc. If it did weigh something closer to a 250f then I think it would be a much easier choice. As of right now, I'd probably just get the CRF450 over it, if it were me.

ktm 350 got more power then a honda 450. haha

If it did weigh something closer to a 250f then I think it would be a much easier choice.

Umm, its the same bike as the 250SXF outside of a different bore and stroke, it weighs pretty much the same.

The newer 4 stroke KTM's are just heavy off the showroom floor. Thats mostly because of the battery, which I removed and put in an ultralight version which shaved considerable weight. In fact, my 2013 250SXF fully loaded with fuel on the track weighs 234lb. Thats actually not that bad, its roughly the same as the Suzuki and Kawasaki, +/- 1 or 2lb. Yea, the CRF is ultralight, it also has a smaller more confined motor without the high pressure oil injection system, without the solid bearings, without the high revving and certainly, substantially down on power. KTM's weight issues actually come from the swing arm and starter motor, if they were to use a Japanese multi-piece swing arm and a kick start, the bike would be the lightest out there by a fair margin. However, because the machine is a steel frame, its critical they increase stiffness in other areas and the all-cast swing arm is one of those areas they've had to increase the weight to help with stiffness. KTM has already made some updates to the arm, lightening it further on the 2014 model lineup, but the weight differences on the new bike are nullified due to the bikes larger fuel tank.

Anyway, don't let weight scare you away. Yes, the CRF is the lightest of the bunch in any form, but its also lacking in power and who wants to kick start a hot 250 or 450f after you crash, not me! :)

Well Tye, that is pretty much what I am saying, even the 250F is somewhat heavy. The fact that the 350 weighs more than a Honda does bother me. I'm sure the bike still flicks around easier than a 450 though. Keep in mind, my current bike is a YZ250F, which is the lightest of the bunch. As far as power, even if it peaks more than the Honda 450, I'm sure the Honda pulls harder across the board. Peak numbers aren't be-all end-all, for me. I realize that the Honda isn't the fastest 450 out there, but I liked the power on the 09-12 bikes, even though it was 'soft'.

 

I've been on 250Fs recently and for my next bike I may get another 250f but still thinking about a bigger bike, since I'm racing in an open class mostly. The 350 and 450 KTMs are certainly at the top of my list (some of that is due to the price I can get), the Honda 450 is likely the other one I would seriously consider. The 350 seems like it could be the ultimate Vet-class bike. I know I would get worn out on the KTm 450, the Honda likely not so much. The 350 is a toss-up for me, since I have yet to ride one.

Well Tye, that is pretty much what I am saying, even the 250F is somewhat heavy. The fact that the 350 weighs more than a Honda does bother me. I'm sure the bike still flicks around easier than a 450 though. Keep in mind, my current bike is a YZ250F, which is the lightest of the bunch. As far as power, even if it peaks more than the Honda 450, I'm sure the Honda pulls harder across the board. Peak numbers aren't be-all end-all, for me. I realize that the Honda isn't the fastest 450 out there, but I liked the power on the 09-12 bikes, even though it was 'soft'.

 

I've been on 250Fs recently and for my next bike I may get another 250f but still thinking about a bigger bike, since I'm racing in an open class mostly. The 350 and 450 KTMs are certainly at the top of my list (some of that is due to the price I can get), the Honda 450 is likely the other one I would seriously consider. The 350 seems like it could be the ultimate Vet-class bike. I know I would get worn out on the KTm 450, the Honda likely not so much. The 350 is a toss-up for me, since I have yet to ride one.

If you like 250F's you will love the 350. Such a fun bike to ride. About the weight thing...  it turns as good or better than my last bike which was an RMZ250 so the weight is just a number.. all that really matters is how it handles if you ask me

The point is fun! I've owned a 2012 350 for nearly two seasons and recently switched back to a 450. My assessment after nearly a month is this; for strictly fun track riding, the 350 has the edge. Here's why: the bike feels about 10 lbs lighter than a Hon 450 - I've ridden them back to back - I don't know why but it really does! Next, you feel faster on a 350. You really have to wring these bikes out when riding them and so, you're pinned out more often. That combined with the noises the engine makes when you're tapped out, really make you feel like you're hauling. The bike is very flickable and feels like you can put it anywhere you like on a track. You can really flick it around and "own" it - you feel like you're in control whereas a 450 needs a little more respect. You learn to enjoy revving the heck out of these things - I used to dislike hitting jumps fully rapped out - a few sessions with a 350 will have you loving it! You can also attack sweepers with the throttle nearly pinned; a 450 requires more caution for fear of the rear stepping out on you and pitching you on a high side. So all this makes for a fun ride - you feel like a moto hero. Now I did fine racing the bike but with my group of friends I typically ride with, I've noticed a difference this year. They all ride 450s and we all have parity when it comes to skills. Since I bought the 350 a few of them upgraded to newer bikes. When play motoing, I started to find it difficult to pass these guys. Staying ahead was ok but, if I ever fell behind, it was tough, if not impossible to get around them. Some of them started pulling on me after getting by, despite me hitting my lines with minimal mistakes and feeling like I had the bike WFO on the track. Getting back on the 450 made me feel sluggish. I had to re adjust to the physical toll a 450 dishes out. The engine just can't turn over as fast. I've gone from revving to chugging. What have I done!??! I thought. Well, play riding with these same guys I found some things out. The added power of the 450 allows you to make mistakes and still be in the game. While goofing a turn with the 350 meant falling behind, with the 450 you can linger around and come back. They marketed the 350 for a vet rider but, I think that's wrong. Vets are usually slower reacting, fatter, and more cautious. To,make the 350 run, you have to hang it out. There were many sessions riding mine where I thanked the powers above that I didn't crash cause I was on the edge. You have to " figure" jumps out more often - you can't rely on brute force to get you over all the time on these things. And so that is why I gave mine up. At 41 yrs old, I went back to a 450. Starts are a no brainier (I was successfully starting in 3rd the last race I did!). Big jumps are lesser a problem, and I don't feel like I'm hanging it out as much. Still, I'd be a liar if I said I didn't miss that 350...

The point is fun! I've owned a 2012 350 for nearly two seasons and recently switched back to a 450. My assessment after nearly a month is this; for strictly fun track riding, the 350 has the edge. Here's why: the bike feels about 10 lbs lighter than a Hon 450 - I've ridden them back to back - I don't know why but it really does! Next, you feel faster on a 350. You really have to wring these bikes out when riding them and so, you're pinned out more often. That combined with the noises the engine makes when you're tapped out, really make you feel like you're hauling. The bike is very flickable and feels like you can put it anywhere you like on a track. You can really flick it around and "own" it - you feel like you're in control whereas a 450 needs a little more respect. You learn to enjoy revving the heck out of these things - I used to dislike hitting jumps fully rapped out - a few sessions with a 350 will have you loving it! You can also attack sweepers with the throttle nearly pinned; a 450 requires more caution for fear of the rear stepping out on you and pitching you on a high side. So all this makes for a fun ride - you feel like a moto hero. Now I did fine racing the bike but with my group of friends I typically ride with, I've noticed a difference this year. They all ride 450s and we all have parity when it comes to skills. Since I bought the 350 a few of them upgraded to newer bikes. When play motoing, I started to find it difficult to pass these guys. Staying ahead was ok but, if I ever fell behind, it was tough, if not impossible to get around them. Some of them started pulling on me after getting by, despite me hitting my lines with minimal mistakes and feeling like I had the bike WFO on the track. Getting back on the 450 made me feel sluggish. I had to re adjust to the physical toll a 450 dishes out. The engine just can't turn over as fast. I've gone from revving to chugging. What have I done!??! I thought. Well, play riding with these same guys I found some things out. The added power of the 450 allows you to make mistakes and still be in the game. While goofing a turn with the 350 meant falling behind, with the 450 you can linger around and come back. They marketed the 350 for a vet rider but, I think that's wrong. Vets are usually slower reacting, fatter, and more cautious. To,make the 350 run, you have to hang it out. There were many sessions riding mine where I thanked the powers above that I didn't crash cause I was on the edge. You have to " figure" jumps out more often - you can't rely on brute force to get you over all the time on these things. And so that is why I gave mine up. At 41 yrs old, I went back to a 450. Starts are a no brainier (I was successfully starting in 3rd the last race I did!). Big jumps are lesser a problem, and I don't feel like I'm hanging it out as much. Still, I'd be a liar if I said I didn't miss that 350...

 

 

So you were on a 2012.....any thoughts on what it would be like if you were on a 2013 with 6 (I think) more hp?  Never having ridden either and pretty much having my mind set on a 350.  Although the 450 still is a consideration.....I am pretty set on a 13/14 350.  

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