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will it be okay to take off a couple of links

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I am just wondering if it would be okay to take off a couple of links of my chain to tight in it cuz it is way to lose right now and it is on my yz125 dirt bike??? I need help and I am new to dirtbike's. and what should I do to my bike for maintenance.

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Yes, you can either take off a couple of links with say, a grinder or a hacksaw(grinder is preferable if you know how to use one safely), or you can adjust the wheel by moving it backwards(but I assume that you have already done this)-if you have not, loosen the axle bolt, taking care to ensure you know what position the brake is in, so you can put it back properly, then pull the wheel backward, tighten a little so it stays in place, and use the wheel alignment beside the axle to make sure it is straight.

as for general maintenance, use some sort of chain lube after you clean your bike(or after riding if you are not going to clean it, so it is lubed for the next ride, if you have nothing else wd-40 is fine, also use some wd40 every couple of rides on any moving parts of the bike-swing arm bolt, linkage bearings, wheel bearings etc.

change the transmission oil every 5 or so rides, the more the better but isn't necessary too often so once every 5 or so rides is good, I change mine every 5-7ish rides

clean your air filter with soapy water, rinse with fresh water then oil it with air filter oil, most auto stores will sell air filter oil----important as it is a yz(I have one too and it gets dirty quickly no matter what conditions you ride it, unless you ride it on the track)

also use wd40 on your clutch lever and around the cable, and the brake lever, pretty much anything that moves, keep the carburetta clean and every so often it does not hurt to take the air box off and clean the carby, I opened mine and it had a little crap in it, but in saying that my whole yz250 had been underwater a couple times in the month before that!

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If he used a grinder or hack saw there's still going to be half cut links stuck in the chain left over. That's like a last resort for a chain you really don't care about. Proper way to do it is using a chain tool with cutter and compressor on it. Even when you have a master link you'll still need a chain tool. Their not cheap($60-90) but very necessary if you do your own service, replacements. The link's pins need to be mushroomed to properly reconnect the chain. Otherwise your going to bust your chain on the trail or track. My $00.02

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If you have run out of adjustment range, your chain and sprockets are shot and need to be replaced.  Unless, they were incorrect in the first place.

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If he used a grinder or hack saw there's still going to be half cut links stuck in the chain left over. That's like a last resort for a chain you really don't care about. Proper way to do it is using a chain tool with cutter and compressor on it. Even when you have a master link you'll still need a chain tool. Their not cheap($60-90) but very necessary if you do your own service, replacements. The link's pins need to be mushroomed to properly reconnect the chain. Otherwise your going to bust your chain on the trail or track. My $00.02

 

You grind the protruding rivit flush with the side link you wish to remove, then hit it through with a punch. Then you are left with 2 narrow ends, like normal, and use a masterlink (clip or "servicable" style, like most everyone uses). No need to re-rivit anything.

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Even when you have a master link you'll still need a chain tool. Their not cheap($60-90) but very necessary if you do your own service, replacements.

 

Good news--you can get a Motion Pro chain breaker for under $30.00.  That's a whole lot easier than grinding and cutting with saws. 

 

For a newbie to adjust your chain, you always want some slack left because if it's too tight it will wear out everything prematurely: sprockets, wheel bearings, swingarm bearings, countershaft bearings, and even the chain itself.  This gauge varies bike to bike, but a good rule of thumb is to leave enough slack in the chain that you can put the bike on a stand, and comfortably slip 3 fingers between the chain and the swingarm right behind the chainslide. 

 

One concern I have is that if the chain is so loose, it maybe completely worn out.  There are two good ways to check the chain wear.  The easiest option is to grab the chain with your thumb/forefinger behind the rear sprocket and see how far away from the sprocket it will stretch.  If you can fit a pencil between the sprocket teeth because the chain pulls so far way, then you need a new chain ASAP.  The other way to check is to remove the chain from the bike, lay on the ground, and try to bend it sideways.  If it bends into a C shape, it's pretty worm out. 

 

Riding a worn out chain is dangerous because if you break it, or throw the chain from the sprockets, you can damage the engine cases causing major $$, hundres of bucks.  I check my chain slack every ride for that reason.

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