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Help! I lost my wheel bearing spacer tube, can i still ride?

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Just like the title says i lost my front wheel bear spacer tube while changing my bearings.  And i have a trip planned and wont have a new one in time.  Can i still ride?

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Go the hardware store and find a piece of pipe (metal) that is the same diameter as the inner race of your wheel bearing.


Cut to fit, go ride.


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This is a question I'm not sure of.. I assume you are talking about the cylinder that goes between the bearings inside the hub??

 

The cylinder does not bear any stress, it seems more of a guide for the axle.  It keeps the bearings from having the tendency to warp, or bend inward inside the hub, thus sustaining their integrity.  The outside of the bearings have the wheel spacers which plug into the hub, holding them in place from the outside. 

 

So I convinced myself, the inner tube is totally necessary or your bearings will inplode.  That's a mess you don't wanna deal with, much less pay for.

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hmmm home skillet has an interesting idea...  i just may have to try that, as long as i get the right lenght and diameter i cant see there being a problem for one ride eh?

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To save a ride. Heck yeah.

 

Install  a bearing on one side of the hub.

Put the metal pipe into the hub and mark it right at the bearing stop on the opposite side. Cut at that mark.

 

The tube keeps the side load off the bearings when you tighten the axle nut.

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Ahh ok home skillet, i wasnt really sure of what its purpose was but now its clear that i need this, and i must go jimmy rig somthing up.  I must ride that dirty ol girl in the back woods this weekend.  Thank you

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You might even want to contact a bearing supply house. They might even have the correct size without having to cut. I have seen just what happens first hand when someone forgets to install the hub spacer. It will manage to destroy brand new bearings in about an hour or two.

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Model and year? Maybe someone can get you an exact length. Its just an aluminum tube.

Also, sounds silly, but check your bolt. I lost mine once, too. Had the family tear apart the garage looking for it. Gave up and found it on the bolt. . . It kind of blended in with the fat part on the right side. . . long day as I recall, lol. Mother Hen stopped talking to me for a while after that.

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This is a question I'm not sure of.. I assume you are talking about the cylinder that goes between the bearings inside the hub??

 

The cylinder does not bear any stress, it seems more of a guide for the axle.  It keeps the bearings from having the tendency to warp, or bend inward inside the hub, thus sustaining their integrity.  The outside of the bearings have the wheel spacers which plug into the hub, holding them in place from the outside. 

 

So I convinced myself, the inner tube is totally necessary or your bearings will inplode.  That's a mess you don't wanna deal with, much less pay for.

You are sort of on the right track; the spacer bears the stress caused by axle nut that clamps everything together (bearing races, spacers).  If the spacer was not there, then the bearings on the wheel would have to support a (considerably) larger axial load. This drastically reduces the life of the bearings, and could lead to premature failure.

 

If you do 'cut a pipe to fit', be sure to measure twice and then some.  You can always grind a little off at a time to get it right, but you can not undo cutting too far. Honestly, it probably is not a very expensive part, and a shop might have something in stock that could work if you're lucky.

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You are sort of on the right track; the spacer bears the stress caused by axle nut that clamps everything together (bearing races, spacers). If the spacer was not there, then the bearings on the wheel would have to support a (considerably) larger axial load. This drastically reduces the life of the bearings, and could lead to premature failure.

If you do 'cut a pipe to fit', be sure to measure twice and then some. You can always grind a little off at a time to get it right, but you can not undo cutting too far. Honestly, it probably is not a very expensive part, and a shop might have something in stock that could work if you're lucky.

Good edumacation thanx

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I have made my own bearing spacers on wheel swaps, not rocket science.  As mentioned before measure exactly.

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Model and year? Maybe someone can get you an exact length. Its just an aluminum tube.

Also, sounds silly, but check your bolt. I lost mine once, too. Had the family tear apart the garage looking for it. Gave up and found it on the bolt. . . It kind of blended in with the fat part on the right side. . . long day as I recall, lol. Mother Hen stopped talking to me for a while after that.

09 ktm 250xc-w front wheel is what its missing from.  If anyone knows the exact measurment or how to find out could you let me know?

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09 ktm 250xc-w front wheel is what its missing from.  If anyone knows the exact measurment or how to find out could you let me know?

Parts fiche says 35x2 L= 79,4 that's a comma, so not sure if it's 79 mm or 79.4 mm. We are talking about the middle tube, right? That should help. Check the trash one more time, too.

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Europe uses a comma instead of a decimal point.  Seen that many times in German manuals. 

 

measure to be sure, the spacer should be the same as the inner bearing race spacing.  If too narrow or wide it will put a side load on the bearing and destroy it.

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as mentioned, the tube stops your bearings getting chewed out by the side tension created by tightening your axle. 

 

if you can't cut a spacer to. fit, a VERY dodgy option is to only do your axle finger tight so (but with heaps of loctite) you don't have that lateral stress on the bearings. then make sure your pinch bolts are firmly holding the axle. check the bearings for wear each hour or so.

 

dodgy? yes. would i do it personally? only if i was very desperate!

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