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08 ttr 110 maintenanxe questions

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Friend of mine found a really clean 110 for 650 bones. Been riding the snot out of it after I cleaned the carb. It sat a while. So I'm figuring I better change oil and air filter. My question is what oil do you recommend for the engine? I assume the gearbox is common oil? What interval would you recommend for changing since I know they don't hold much? How about adjusting valves on these things? Thanks and no he didn't get a manual for the bike. Just trying to help him along and get it serviced.

Edited by thumpinyami59

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Thanks and no he didn't get a manual for the bike. Just trying to help him along and get it serviced.

Your friend is lucky to have someone help him keep his bike running.  He should go get a shop manual.  It's the first thing I do whenever I buy a bike.  The $30 for a genuine Yamaha service manual is well worth it.  If you're going to be nice enough to maintain the bike, he should at least buy the shop manual (and provide you with some frosty beverages for your labor).  It's the least he could do to make your job easier.

 

Oil really comes down to personal preference.  Opinions are all over the map.  Just make sure you don't use anything labeled "energy conserving".  Clutches don't like it.  For my small bikes, I change the oil frequently (10 hours or less) and they aren't ridden hard, although they are frequently ridden when it's 80+ degrees.  Others will say that's a waste of money, but at $3.50/qt for Rotella, it's not much money at all.  Transmissions are very hard on oil.

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I'm fine with rotella. I ran it in my yz250f. I'm well aware of the debate lol just wasn't sure it came over here. I'm not too concerned with the manual and he may get one eventually but he does supply plenty of cold drinks as well as a pw80 for my boy to ride while I sesrch out a new bike for him. So I'd say we are even. Thanksbfor the info. I'll grab some rotella and get the air filter cleaned and send the kids riding. This ttr is a blast to tear up some grass on. Thanks again.

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I'll grab some rotella and get the air filter cleaned and send the kids riding. This ttr is a blast to tear up some grass on. Thanks again.

One thing about Rotella.  I do all of my riding when it's warm to hot.  I see you're in Ohio and headed for the colder seasons.  Regular Rotella is 15W40, which may be fine when the temperatures are on the warm side of the spectrum.  But, if the bike will be used when it's cold out, you'll probably want to use something like a 10W40 or even a 5W40 synthetic.  This is why the manual is important.  You'll typically find a temperature vs. viscosity chart in there.  There's not usually a one-size-fits-all oil if the temperatures change drastically throughout the year but a 5W40 might cover all temperatures you expect to encounter.

 

Besides Rotella, I've used the Valvoline motorcycle oils available at my local auto parts store.  It's reasonably priced, but more than Rotella.  Is it the best?  Who knows?  It works fine for me.  I think frequent changes are more important.  This is where the huge debate will come in.  I just know that if I let the oil go for more than 10 hours or so, the shifting gets notchy.  Then, I know the oil has been "used up", so to speak.

Edited by Punkinhead

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Thanks for the input. I was thinking about that. I may go with the 10w40 since we may have the bike out into late fall. I always ran 15w40 but I stopped riding that bike in September/october generally. Thanks for the manual link too. That will help.

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