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Getting the guts to jump!

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So at the track I ride the most I only hit a few of the jumps. it is a pro national track ( Budds Creek) so all of the jumps are huge, to me anyway! I feel so badly that I could hit them! I just cant get the guts to try! I don't want to be stupid and hurt myself, but I just feel like I could so bad! I know it is mostly mental in my case, so how do you guys get the guts to hit the big jumps for the first time?

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Not sure what the jumps are like but if they are table tops just try hitting a little faster each time. I can't answer for doubles I tend not to hit those due to crashing.

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Some jumps can be tested by jumping a little further each time until you can get a feel for the speed needed, and some can't.  The ones you can sample a little at a time, can give you an idea on the speed needed to get over the ones you can't sample.  In general you would rather over jump than come up short, dependent on the obstacle. 

 

Carrying the speed to clear an obstacle is only part of the process, you need to be able to adjust the bike in the air too, in case you are nose high or nose down.  Also you front tire is a gyro when spinning, and turning the bars can help adjust you postion too, as well as body postion up the face of a jump, and leaving the face of a jump.

 

Until I learned how to jump, I would sometimes approach a jump from off the track, so I didn't have to clear it out of a corner under heavy throttle.  Approaching a jump with even momentum, verses hard on the throttle is different, and much easier.  Once you learn to corner with smooth speed, the whole track changes the way you approach each obstacle.  If you're constantly bobbling in the corners, and having to make up speed, it can increase the risk of an incident.

 

I used to watch videos, set on the side of the track and watch the fast guys, but then I had to put it in practice.  Cautious but methodical seat time will get you there.  Gear up well.........because occasionally you will sample Mother Earth. 

Edited by WALKINGWOUNDED

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I started jumping with my friends there... So its like do it or get made fun of, so its just go and dont stop halfway trhough, once you set your mind to it, you cant back out

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So at the track I ride the most I only hit a few of the jumps. it is a pro national track ( Budds Creek) so all of the jumps are huge, to me anyway! I feel so badly that I could hit them! I just cant get the guts to try! I don't want to be stupid and hurt myself, but I just feel like I could so bad! I know it is mostly mental in my case, so how do you guys get the guts to hit the big jumps for the first time?

 

Try other tracks too.    Where else do you go?   I have yet to ride Budds, but I want to get on it!

Sometimes a good variety helps.    Best thing, get with a rider that you know is competent.    Have them lead you up to the jump(s).   

I used to do that with my dad all the time.   After enough experience, I could figure out the proper speed.   I would then lead him over it, and tell him if there were any unusual things on the takeoff (needing to seat bounce, is it a kicker jump, a G-out take off, or just a "floater" jump)   He would then pace me and clear it.

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I hated jumping and now im kinda hooked, I just took it easy on a table top and each time I would hit it a little harder, finally cleared it. After that you get a little mental stability that you can jump, only thing is that damn double. I have hit a few now but I still dont care for it you just have to forget about the gap and just go for it. Its starting to get more comfy now cause like I said once u get that mentality that u can clear it its no biggie no more. Good Luck!

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just follow the other riders and keep the same speed they do.... i find this helps me sometimes when im feeling uncertain.

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Many crashes have led me to this conclusion: When in doubt, there is no doubt.

 

If you aren't sure you are capable of jumping, don't do it.  Practice on tabletops where you don't have to clear the entire jump.  Don't hit a double until you are firmly confident you can do it.  This would have saved me almost a year of my life in rehab and being off work for injuries.

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I just have to take a lot of practice run ups, and sometimes jump it part way if it's a jump that you can do it on... Take your time,

 

This

just follow the other riders and keep the same speed they do.... i find this helps me sometimes when im feeling uncerrtain.

sometimes this . I started on tabletops. once your clearing a huge one youll know the speed you need to carry for the most part. 

 

 

For me mostly i get in the zone chasing someone or just say go for it and twist the throttle. Not the smartest way i know but i have cleared some scary doubles this way . I have hit way bigger table tops and steup and such. Just recently started hitting a scary double at a track i ride. came around the berm and decided to just go for it see what happens :p its one of my fav jumps now 

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you get better by hitting other jumps that you can clear. That means riding other tracks, looking for natural jumps, ect.

 

A lot of jumps can't be worked up to by jumping a little further each time. You just have to get comfortable with different faces and how fast you need to go to jump a certain distance, then adjust for if the landing is above/below the lip. Usually I'll roll then face a few times to figure out how high/far it throws you, then figure out the distance, then go for it.

 

Start off doing this on small jumps you can do safely. Learn to jump them with out having to work your way up. It will eventually allow you to hit larger jumps that you can't jump a little further each time on.

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Your post clearly shows your dilemma ! Your just not comfortable enough yet, give it time, it will come. Don't expect things to end well giving a huge jump half your effort, commit or eat sh*t !! When your truly ready for it, hit it full on, clean it and feel good. Until your comfortable enough to do that, roll the jump and work on your cornering ! Youll get better, don't expect it to happen overnight and understand you can still be quick rolling jumps :)

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you get better by hitting other jumps that you can clear. That means riding other tracks, looking for natural jumps, ect.

 

A lot of jumps can't be worked up to by jumping a little further each time. You just have to get comfortable with different faces and how fast you need to go to jump a certain distance, then adjust for if the landing is above/below the lip. Usually I'll roll then face a few times to figure out how high/far it throws you, then figure out the distance, then go for it.

 

Start off doing this on small jumps you can do safely. Learn to jump them with out having to work your way up. It will eventually allow you to hit larger jumps that you can't jump a little further each time on.

 

that is the problem. the two hug jumps i want to hit are table tops, but they shoot you so high you either have to half it or just do it!

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Your post clearly shows your dilemma ! Your just not comfortable enough yet, give it time, it will come. Don't expect things to end well giving a huge jump half your effort, commit or eat sh*t !! When your truly ready for it, hit it full on, clean it and feel good. Until your comfortable enough to do that, roll the jump and work on your cornering ! Youll get better, don't expect it to happen overnight and understand you can still be quick rolling jumps :)

 

so me not having the "guts'' to hit them means i am not ready? i just feel like like skill wise i could, but mentally i cant! i keep on thinking once you are 20+ feet in the air you could be screwed!

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so me not having the "guts'' to hit them means i am not ready? i just feel like like skill wise i could, but mentally i cant! i keep on thinking once you are 20+ feet in the air you could be screwed!

 

 

it doesn't have anything to do with guts. If you don't have the skills to judge the speed, then you wont be able to do it. The people hitting it aren't doing it because one day they got the guts to hit it. They hit it because they put in the time and effort at other places on other jumps learning how to judge speed and correct mistakes in air. They aren't just going for it. They know when they hit it how and where they are going to land. Until that point they have no business hitting the jump. It's good to have goals, but just going out and hucking a fat table isn't a smart one.

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i know you have to have the skills and you cant just go out and try it. i ride at 2 other tracks that i hit most of the jumps. my problem is that i think my problem is all mental. i have the skills to hit them. but i guess what you are saying is if i have any doubt i must not have the skills. i just realized that your name is die trying! that is ironic!

 

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So at the track I ride the most I only hit a few of the jumps. it is a pro national track ( Budds Creek) so all of the jumps are huge, to me anyway! I feel so badly that I could hit them! I just cant get the guts to try! I don't want to be stupid and hurt myself, but I just feel like I could so bad! I know it is mostly mental in my case, so how do you guys get the guts to hit the big jumps for the first time?

I agree with many of the post here, you have to put in the time on the bike and build confidence gradually. But at the same time it's helpful to know what you're suppose to be doing. There's some tips: 

 The best way to learn is to get the proper techniques down on easy to clear jumps. Then doing the proper techniques through repetition on these easier type jumps will allow you to develop the skills for the big jumps.

Following are the basic techniques for jumping.

 

 The best way to learn is to get the proper techniques down on easy to clear jumps. Then doing the proper techniques through repetition on these easier type jumps will allow you to develop the skills for the big jumps. Following are the basic techniques for jumping.

 

The most important part of the jump is where the bike actually leaves the ground, where you have the compression and rebound part of the jump.  What gives you control at this critical part of the jump is your body movements and throttle control.  Along with this body movement and throttle control is timing.  The timing is so critical that the body movement and throttle control has to be an automatic reflex reaction.  This is why it takes so much time and practice to learn to jump well.   Key into the compression and rebound part of the jump, move your body back a little as the rear wheel kicks up and blip the throttle a little at the same time.  This will cause the front wheel to stay level or come up a little.  If the front wheel is too high don’t move back as much or give it as much throttle.  If you want the front end lower it’s just the opposite; don’t blip the throttle as much and don’t move back as much.  When you want to accelerate after the landing it’s best to land with the throttle on. I have 3 Technique DVDs that cover Jumping and Whoops.  You can see free Motocross Technique DVD previews of these and many others at: www.motocrossdvds.com

 

Until you perfect all these techniques and your jumping is very consistent and controlled I would not try the real big jumps. Just do what you feel confident in doing and over time you will develop the skills needed for all the jumps on the track. In the meantime have fun and ride smart.

 

 

The guys you see doing the big jumps out there have more seat time, more experience and more practice than you, so don't try to push it too fast you could just end up being hurt.  You'll know when it's time to pull the trigger on the big jumps. You know it when you feel the confidence. 

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Has anyone mentioned that your suspension should be set up properly for your weight and be adjusted to work properly?  It's hard- or impossible- to gain confidence in jumping if you either land so hard because of stiff suspension or bottom so severely that you cant even stay upright on the seat.

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I agree with many of the post here, you have to put in the time on the bike and build confidence gradually. But at the same time it's helpful to know what you're suppose to be doing. There's some tips: 

 The best way to learn is to get the proper techniques down on easy to clear jumps. Then doing the proper techniques through repetition on these easier type jumps will allow you to develop the skills for the big jumps.

Following are the basic techniques for jumping.

 

 The best way to learn is to get the proper techniques down on easy to clear jumps. Then doing the proper techniques through repetition on these easier type jumps will allow you to develop the skills for the big jumps. Following are the basic techniques for jumping.

 

The most important part of the jump is where the bike actually leaves the ground, where you have the compression and rebound part of the jump.  What gives you control at this critical part of the jump is your body movements and throttle control.  Along with this body movement and throttle control is timing.  The timing is so critical that the body movement and throttle control has to be an automatic reflex reaction.  This is why it takes so much time and practice to learn to jump well.   Key into the compression and rebound part of the jump, move your body back a little as the rear wheel kicks up and blip the throttle a little at the same time.  This will cause the front wheel to stay level or come up a little.  If the front wheel is too high don’t move back as much or give it as much throttle.  If you want the front end lower it’s just the opposite; don’t blip the throttle as much and don’t move back as much.  When you want to accelerate after the landing it’s best to land with the throttle on. I have 3 Technique DVDs that cover Jumping and Whoops.  You can see free Motocross Technique DVD previews of these and many others at: www.motocrossdvds.com

 

Until you perfect all these techniques and your jumping is very consistent and controlled I would not try the real big jumps. Just do what you feel confident in doing and over time you will develop the skills needed for all the jumps on the track. In the meantime have fun and ride smart.

 

 

The guys you see doing the big jumps out there have more seat time, more experience and more practice than you, so don't try to push it too fast you could just end up being hurt.  You'll know when it's time to pull the trigger on the big jumps. You know it when you feel the confidence. 

 

 

first of all, thank you very much for your reply in both this and my other topic.  I am sure I will find them useful. also, recently I purchased a 2013 kx450f coming off of a crf250r. I have had no problems adjusting to the power difference other then starts. I only weight about 140 with gear so even starting in 2nd and feathering the clutch I wheelie. my bike does have launch mode/ traction control. what do you think my problem is/ recommend I do? other then go back to a 250!   thank you very much! Jared

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