Rear shocks

Just wondering some opinions, is it worth rebuilding a rear shock? Or is it better just to go aftermarket and junk the blown shock?

I would call a local dealer or send it out and have it rebuilt, If you have been riding on a blown shock the excessive heat from oil loss could have damaged internals (if that is the problem), in that case it might be easier to look for a 

used shock on ebay and have it rebuilt.  If it leaked out the nitrogen you might have a blown bladder or something, either way i would think rebuilding it or finding a used one would be cheaper than going full aftermarket.

The shock is easier to rebuild than the forks IMHO. The only caution is to make absolutely sure you have released the nitrogen before compressing the reservoir cap to take the circlip out. Easy with the schrader valve. The needle type makes things a little tougher, since you need a syringe. Google it and you will find solution if necessary. When you get it back together, you can go to a dealer for a nitrogen charge. Don't use air.

The only other tool you will need for the KXF is a thread cutter. For whatever reason, the rod is preened at the top, so you have to file it down to get the nut off, then re-thread.

The bladder is $18. No way I would sacrifice that shock. Rebuild it or have it done.

In this economy, an aftermarket shock costs more than the bike is worth! Rebuild can save you big$.

It was $140 for the rebuild on my '99 YZ250 from Enzo.  Had blown bladder so that included labor, new bladder, wearable parts, fluids, etc.  Reused the spring and valves.

Edited by JFoVStar650

In this economy, an aftermarket shock costs more than the bike is worth! Rebuild can save you big$.

 yea who really makes an aftermarket shock really? ohlins, works and then an A kit rear shock   those are all over a grand im pretty sure.  

Go browse around the suspension section. I rebuilt mine using a write up I found there by Dave J I think. This was for a KYB but there should be write ups for Showa as well. Mine was just starting to leak not blown. You will need a vise. I know there is a youtube vid of doing it without one but I only watched half of it and decided I was definately getting a vise. Got my parts from SDi. Read the write ups an decide if you are mechanically inclined enough to do it. If not send it out. Still cheaper than a new one.

Just wondering some opinions, is it worth rebuilding a rear shock? Or is it better just to go aftermarket and junk the blown shock?

 

Normally, shocks get rebuilt or replace with used ones.  Complete new units are way too expensive  in general.   But the best answer is dependent on what kind of bike you have to work with.

Don't use air.

And why is that?

And why is that?

 

Air works, but not as well as nitrogen.  There's nothing wrong with using it to partly inflate the bladder for assembly, or even temporarily using it to run on, but compressed air is normally contaminated with water vapor, and possibly other stuff, plus there are distinct technical advantages to nitrogen in that role.

Air works, but not as well as nitrogen.  There's nothing wrong with using it to partly inflate the bladder for assembly, or even temporarily using it to run on, but compressed air is normally contaminated with water vapor, and possibly other stuff, plus there are distinct technical advantages to nitrogen in that role.

 

Thanks grayracer, very concise answer considering your expertise in this area.  Air does work, and it's a lot better than not charging the bladder at all, but my understanding is that nitrogen is used because it's not contaminated with moisture and thus less apt to react as much to heat as air might.  Of course, I gained this understanding in large part as a result of reading the contributions of a guy named grayracer.  

 

As for the question of rebuild vs. buy used, have it rebuilt.  Also, you have nothing to loose by trying this project yourself.  As long as you don't injure yourself by not dealing with the extremely high pressure in the reservoir, you will be fine.  And, by not dealing with it, I mean not releasing the pressure fully before disassembly.

 

The manual is very specific about the steps needed to service the shock and rebuild kits are available.  

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